Top Australia History Ebooks

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A Commonwealth of Thieves - Thomas Keneally Cover Art

A Commonwealth of Thieves

A Commonwealth of Thieves by Thomas Keneally

In this spirited history of the remarkable first four years of the convict settlement of Australia, Thomas Keneally offers us a human view of a fascinating piece of history. Combining the authority of a renowned historian with a brilliant narrative flair, Keneally gives us an inside view of this unprecedented experiment from the perspective of the new colony’s governor, Arthur Phillips. Using personal journals and documents, Keneally re-creates the hellish overseas voyage and the challenges Phillips faced upon arrival: unruly convicts, disgruntled officers, bewildered and hostile natives, food shortages, and disease. He also offers captivating portrayals of Aborigines and of convict settlers who were determined to begin their lives anew. A Commonwealth of Thieves immerses us in the fledgling penal colony and conjures up the thrills and hardships of those first four improbable years.

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The Fatal Shore - Robert Hughes Cover Art

The Fatal Shore

The Fatal Shore The epic of Australia's founding by Robert Hughes

In this bestselling account of the colonization of Australia, Robert Hughes explores how the convict transportation system created the country we know today. Digging deep into the dark history of England's infamous efforts to move 160,000 men and women thousands of miles to the other side of the world in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Hughes has crafted a groundbreaking, definitive account of the settling of Australia. Tracing the European presence in Australia from early explorations through the rise and fall of the penal colonies, and featuring 16 pages of illustrations and 3 maps, The Fatal Shore brings to life the incredible true history of a country we thought we knew.

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The Aborigines Of Western Australia - Albert F. Calvert Cover Art

The Aborigines Of Western Australia

The Aborigines Of Western Australia by Albert F. Calvert

The Aborigines Of Western Australia by Albert F. Calvert This short book looks at the life and beliefs of The Aborigines of Western Australia. As with most of the books from this era and dealing with this type of subject, you have to be wary of the racism that underlines them. That said, the author was well intentioned. Calvert, who lists literally dozens of academic affiliations on the title page, does criticize his contemporaries for their treatment of Aborigines as subhumans. Throughout the essay he attempts to demonstrate that the native Australians have a complete cultural inventory. He notes that many of the Aboriginal beliefs and practices which seem strange to Europeans are not that different than some listed in the Bible. He ends with a plea for protection of the Aborigines. It bears pointing out this paternalistic attitude ironically led to policies which devastated aboriginal culture.

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Farther Than Any Man - Martin Dugard Cover Art

Farther Than Any Man

Farther Than Any Man The Rise and Fall of Captain James Cook by Martin Dugard

James Cook never laid eyes on the sea until he was in his teens. He then began an extraordinary rise from farmboy outsider to the hallowed rank of captain of the Royal Navy, leading three historic journeys that would forever link his name with fearless exploration (and inspire pop-culture heroes like Captain Hook and Captain James T. Kirk). In Farther Than Any Man, noted modern-day adventurer Martin Dugard strips away the myth of Cook and instead portrays a complex, conflicted man of tremendous ambition (at times to a fault), intellect (though Cook was routinely underestimated) and sheer hardheadedness. When Great Britain announced a major circumnavigation in 1768 -- a mission cloaked in science, but aimed at the pursuit of world power -- it came as a political surprise that James Cook was given command. Cook's surveying skills had contributed to the British victory over France in the Seven Years' War in 1763, but no commoner had ever commanded a Royal Navy vessel. Endeavor 's stunning three-year journey changed the face of modern exploration, charting the vast Pacific waters, the eastern coasts of New Zealand and Australia, and making landfall in Tahiti, Tierra del Fuego, and Rio de Janeiro. After returning home a hero, Cook yearned to get back to sea. He soon took control of the Resolution and returned to his beloved Pacific, in search of the elusive Southern Continent. It was on this trip that Cook's taste for power became an obsession, and his legendary kindness to island natives became an expectation of worship -- traits that would lead him first to greatness, then to catastrophe. Full of action, lush description, and fascinating historical characters like King George III and Master William Bligh, Dugard's gripping account of the life and gruesome demise of Capt. James Cook is a thrilling story of a discoverer hell-bent on traveling farther than any man.

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Pacific Worlds - Matt K. Matsuda Cover Art

Pacific Worlds

Pacific Worlds A History of Seas, Peoples, and Cultures by Matt K. Matsuda

Asia, the Pacific Islands and the coasts of the Americas have long been studied separately. This essential single-volume history of the Pacific traces the global interactions and remarkable peoples that have connected these regions with each other and with Europe and the Indian Ocean, for millennia. From ancient canoe navigators, monumental civilisations, pirates and seaborne empires, to the rise of nuclear testing and global warming, Matt Matsuda ranges across the frontiers of colonial history, anthropology and Pacific Rim economics and politics, piecing together a history of the region. The book identifies and draws together the defining threads and extraordinary personal narratives which have contributed to this history, showing how localised contacts and contests have often blossomed into global struggles over colonialism, tourism and the rise of Asian economies. Drawing on Asian, Oceanian, European, American, ancient and modern narratives, the author assembles a fascinating Pacific region from a truly global perspective.

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The Tin Ticket - Deborah J. Swiss Cover Art

The Tin Ticket

The Tin Ticket The Heroic Journey of Australia's Convict Women by Deborah J. Swiss

Historian Deborah J. Swiss tells the heartbreaking, horrifying, and ultimately triumphant story of the women exiled from the British Isles and forced into slavery and savagery-who created the most liberated society of their time. Agnes McMillan and Janet Houston were convicted for shoplifting. Bridget Mulligan stole a bucket of milk; Widow Ludlow Tedder, eleven spoons. For their crimes, they would be sent not to jail, but to ships teeming with other female convicts. Tin tickets, stamped with numbers, were hung around the women's necks, and the ships set out to carry them to their new home: Van Diemen's Land, later known as Tasmania, part of the British Empire's crown jewel, Australia. Men outnumbered women nine to one there, and few "proper" citizens were interested in emigrating. The deportation of thousands of petty criminals-the vast majority nonviolent first offenders-provided a convenient solution for the government. Crossing Shark-infested waters, some died in shipwrecks during the four-month journey, or succumbed to infections and were sent to a watery grave. Others were impregnated against their will by their captors. They arrived as nothing more than property. But incredibly, as the years passed, they managed not only to endure their privation and pain but to thrive on their own terms, breaking the chains of bondage, and forging a society that treated women as equals and led the world in women's rights. The Tin Ticket takes us to the dawn of the nineteenth century and into the lives of Agnes McMillan, whose defiance and resilience carried her to a far more dramatic rebellion; Agnes's best friend Janet Houston, who rescued her from the Glasgow wynds and was also transported to Van Diemen's Land; Ludlow Tedder, forced to choose just one of her four children to accompany her to the other side of the world; Bridget Mulligan, who gave birth to a line of powerful women stretching to the present day. It also tells the tale of Elizabeth Gurney Fry, a Quaker reformer who touched all their lives. Ultimately, it is the story of women discarded by their homeland and forgotten by history-who, by sheer force of will, become the heart and soul of a new nation.

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Girt - David Hunt Cover Art

Girt

Girt The Unauthorised History of Australia by David Hunt

Girt. No word could better capture the essence of Australia... In this hilarious history, David Hunt reveals the truth of Australia’s past, from megafauna to Macquarie – the cock-ups and curiosities, the forgotten eccentrics and Eureka moments that have made us who we are. Girt introduces forgotten heroes like Mary McLoghlin, transported for the crime of “felony of sock”, and Trim the cat, who beat a French monkey to become the first animal to circumnavigate Australia. It recounts the misfortunes of the escaped Irish convicts who set out to walk from Sydney to China, guided only by a hand-drawn paper compass, and explains the role of the coconut in Australia’s only military coup. Our nation’s beginnings are steeped in the strange, the ridiculous and the frankly bizarre. Girt proudly reclaims these stories for all of us. Not to read it would be un-Australian. Winner of the 2014 Indie Award for Non-Fiction Shortlisted in the 2014 ABA Nielsen BookData Bookseller's Choice Awards, the 2014 NSW Premier's Literary Awards and the 2014 Australian Book Industry Awards. ‘Australian history never looked like this! Beneath the humour is an interesting analysis backed by extensive research, which has uprooted some little-known historical gems. Girt will appeal to readers who enjoyed John Birmingham’s Leviathan as much as lovers of Chaser-style satire and the humour of John Clarke … and leaves this reader hoping there will be further instalments.’ — Books+Publishing ‘ Girt … cuts an irreverent swath through the facts, fools, fantasies and frauds that made this country what it is today, hoisting sacred cows on their own petards and otherwise sawing the legs off Lady Macquarie’s chair. I was transported.’ —Shane Maloney, The Age Best Books of 2013 ‘ Girt is a ripping read… a humorous history that is accessible enough to share with the eight-year-old. Hunt’s writing interests span comedy, politics and history, a happy triumvirate when your subject is Australia.’ —Stephen Romei, The Australian ‘There is barely a page in Girt that won’t inspire a chortle. It’s our early history told by a writer with a wit sharp enough to slice tomatoes. But it’s not all jokes and jolly japes. David Hunt has done his research…’ — Herald Sun ‘David Hunt knows how to make the most of history’s juicy bits to hook the reader.’ — The Age

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A Short History of New Zealand - Gordon McLauchlan Cover Art

A Short History of New Zealand

A Short History of New Zealand by Gordon McLauchlan

A new edition of the bestselling short history on New Zealand, updated to include the Helen Clark years, the rise of John Key, the Christchurch earthquakes and the 2011 Rugby World Cup!  A lively and accessible history written by one of New Zealand’s most well-known commentators on matters past and present. Succinct and well referenced, this book is the most accessible introduction to New Zealand history currently in print. 

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The Catalpa Expedition - Z. Walter Pease Cover Art

The Catalpa Expedition

The Catalpa Expedition (With Illustrations) by Z. Walter Pease

One hundred years after the Declaration of Independence, an American whaling captain, George S. Anthony, commemorated the event by enforcing another declaration of independence which set free the Irish political prisoners who were sentenced to a lifetime of servitude in the English penal colony in Australia. The story of the rescue of these prisoners in 1876 is a brave incident of history which has hitherto been told too briefly. When Captain Anthony, commanding the bark Catalpa, landed the men for whose relief the expedition was planned, at New York, public interest in the romantic voyage was very intense. The boldness of the raid upon the English colony and the remarkable features of the conspiracy, excited universal curiosity concerning the details of the affair. At that time international complications seemed certain, and there were many reasons why those concerned in the rescue furnished only meagre information of the inception of the plan and its progress during the two years which were spent in bringing it to a successful consummation. Brief newspaper accounts appeared at the time, and this material has been worked over into magazine sketches. The frequency with which the original newspaper story has been revived during the years which have elapsed suggested that the interest was still alive and led to the writing of the story which follows. The facts were contributed by Captain Anthony, who placed his log-book and personal records at the disposition of the writer, and the present version is authorized by the man who was most prominent in it. Some of the incidents of history which led up to the Fenian conspiracy in 1867 are compiled from familiar sources. The records of the court-martial are from transcripts of the proceedings made in Dublin expressly for this book, and have never previously been published. No attempt has been made to embellish the narrative. It has been the effort of the writer to tell it simply, as he knows the gallant commander would best like to have it told...

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The Mutiny on the Bounty - Captain William Bligh Cover Art

The Mutiny on the Bounty

The Mutiny on the Bounty Texts by Captain Bligh, Sir John Farrow, and Rosalind Amelia Young by Captain William Bligh

The Mutiny of the Bounty is one of the most famous stories in maritime history that has been told in countless books and motion pictures. It describes the arduous voyage of the H.M.S. Bounty, under the harsh rule of the strict Captain Bligh, and the eventual mutiny of much of the crew led by the Mutineer Fletcher Christian. Less well-known is the incredible survival story of how Captain Bligh and fourteen loyal men were cast adrift in an tiny open boat, and how they survived an astonishing journey of 4,000 miles of the Southern Ocean, driven to extreme hardship. On his return to land, Captain Bligh sought justice against the mutineers, and several of them were captured, except for those who had sought to evade detection for ever by starting a new and tiny colony on the Island of Pitcairn - a speck of land in the vast Pacific Ocean. Here the mutineers, along with their descendants lived for many decades until the World finally caught up with them again, one of the strangest and most unique stories in World History. This book brings together 4 separated narratives, the first two being the personal accounts of Captain Bligh himself, detailing the original voyage of the Bounty, the Mutiny and the subsequent voyage across the South Sea. The third Text was written by Sir John Barrow, who, as Secretary t the Admiralty in Britain had a particular insight into the whole affair. The final text is a history of the vents on Pitcairn Island, by Rosalind Amelia Young, one of the native daughters of the Island, and a descendant of the original Mutineers of the Bounty.

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Australian History for Dummies - Alex McDermott Cover Art

Australian History for Dummies

Australian History for Dummies by Alex McDermott

Created especially for the Australian customer! Exciting and informative history of the land down under Australian History For Dummies is your tour guide through the important events of Australia's past, introducing you to the people and events that have shaped modern Australia. Be there as British colonists explore Australia's harsh terrain with varying degrees of success. In this informative guide you'll Find out about Australia's infamous bushrangers Learn how the discovery of gold caused a tidal wave of immigration from all over the world Understand how Australia took two steps forward to become a nation in its own right in 1901, and two steps back when the government was dismissed by the Crown in 1975 Discover the fascinating details that made Australia the country it is today!

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The Great Christmas Escape - Kellie Hailes Cover Art

The Great Christmas Escape

The Great Christmas Escape by Kellie Hailes

It's time to swap mistletoe and mince pies for the adventure of a lifetime! Sara's life has been in a bit of a rut. Lately, her job as a photographer has just meant taking photos of happy couples and families all day before returning to her empty flat. And while she normally loves Christmas with her family, this year a part of her just wants to run away. So when her ex-husband Fin gets in touch with a wild idea - a joint work trip to New Zealand - she knows it's crazy... but she says yes! A celebrated travel blogger, Fin has made a career out of following his bliss. As much as he loves Sara, the steady family life she's always wanted is not one he can give her. This trip together is his one chance to win her back. But can he convert her to his impulsive lifestyle? There's only one way to find out. As the two explore the stunning sights and thrills of New Zealand, they're about to discover there's so much more to each other than they ever realised... A Christmas romcom like no other, The Great Christmas Escape by Kellie Hailes is the perfect getaway read this year...

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Australia in Arms: A Narrative of the Australian Imperial Force and Their Achievement at Anzac - Lieutenant Phillip Frederick Edward Schuler Cover Art

Australia in Arms: A Narrative of the Australian Imperial Force and Their Achievement at Anzac

Australia in Arms: A Narrative of the Australian Imperial Force and Their Achievement at Anzac by Lieutenant Phillip Frederick Edward Schuler

It is impossible to look back and recall without a glow of intense pride the instantaneous response made by the young manhood of Australia to the first signal of danger which fluttered at the central masthead of the Empire. As time goes on that pride has increased as battalions and brigades have followed one another into the firing-line; it has become now a pride steeped in the knowledge that the baptism of fire has proven the young nation, has given it an indelible stamp of Nationhood, has provoked from the lips of a great English soldier the phrase, "These men from Australasia form the greatest army that an Empire has ever produced." To-day that pride is the courage with which the people face and mourn the loss of their thousands of braves. Let me recall the first dark days of August 1914, when the minds of the people of the Australian Commonwealth were grappling with and striving to focus the position of the British Empire in the war into which they had been so precipitately hurled. On Sunday, 2nd August, I well remember in Melbourne an army friend of mine being hastily recalled from a tennis party; and when I went to see him at the Victoria Barracks that same night, I found the whole place a glare of lights from end to end of the grim, grey stone building. It was the same the next and the next night, and for weeks, and so into the months. But even when the Governor-General, Sir Ronald Munro Ferguson, sent to the Prime Minister (Mr. Joseph Cook), at noon on 3rd August the telegram bearing the announcement that we all knew could not long be withheld, the strain seemed unlifted. "England has declared war on Germany" was the brief but terrible message quickly transferred to the broadsheets that the newspapers printed at lightning speed and circulated, while the crowds in the streets cheered and cheered again as the message was posted on the display boards. That night the streets were thronged (as they were for weeks to follow), and there was a series of riots, quickly subdued by the police, where raids had been made on German premises. Feeling was extraordinarily bitter, considering the remoteness of the Dominion. The Navy Office was barred to the casual visitor. Military motor-cars swept through the streets and whirled into the barracks square. Army and Fleet, the new Australian Naval unit, were ready. More than one person during those grey days felt a thrill of satisfaction and comfort in the knowledge that of that Fleet unit the battle-cruiser Australia was greater and more powerful than any enemy vessel in Pacific waters.

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A Short History of Australia - Ernest Scott Cover Art

A Short History of Australia

A Short History of Australia by Ernest Scott

There was a period when maps of the world were published whereon the part occupied by the continent of Australia was a blank space. On other maps, dating from about the same time, land masses were represented which we now know to have been imaginary. Let us look at four examples. The first is a map drawn by Robert Thorne in the reign of Henry VIII (1527). He said in an apology for his work that ‘it may seem rude,’ and so it was; but it serves the purpose of proving that Thorne and the Spanish geographers from whom he derived his information knew nothing about a continent near Australia. Sixty years later a map published at Paris showed a portion of New Guinea, but still the place occupied by Australia was left as open ocean. A Dutch map published at Amsterdam in 1594 did indeed indicate a large stretch of southern land, and called it Terra Australis, but it bore no resemblance to the real continent either in shape or situation. In 1595 a map by Hondius, a Dutchman living in London, was published to illustrate the voyage of Francis Drake round the globe. It represented New Guinea as an island, approximately in its right position, though the shape of it was defective. To the south of it, and divided from it by a strait, appeared a large mass of land named Terra Australis. The outline is not much like that of the continent of Australia, but it was apparently copied from an earlier Dutch map by Ortelius (1587), upon which were printed words in Latin stating that whether New Guinea was an island or part of an austral continent was uncertain. Many other early maps could be instanced, but these four will suffice to exhibit the defective state of knowledge concerning this region at the end of the sixteenth century. By that time the belief had grown that there probably was a large area of land in the southern hemisphere. Much earlier, in the Middle Ages, some had seriously questioned whether there could possibly be antipodes. Learned and ingenious men argued about it, for and against, at considerable length; for it was much easier to write large folios in Latin about the form of the earth than to go forth in ships and find out. One famous cosmographer, Cosmas Indicopleustes, scoffed at the very idea of there being countries inhabited by people who walked about with their feet opposite to those of Europeans and their bodies (as he imagined) hanging downwards, like flies on a ceiling. How, he asked, could rain ‘be said to “fall” or “descend,” as in the Psalms and Gospels, in those regions where it could only be said to come up?’ Consequently he declared ideas about antipodes to be nothing better than ‘old wives’ fables.’ Another class of speculators maintained that there necessarily must be antipodes, because the globe had to be equally poised on both sides of its own centre. As there was a large mass of land, consisting of Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and North America, on the one side of the Equator, they argued that there had to be a balance of earth at the opposite extremity.

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James Cook - Peter FitzSimons Cover Art

James Cook

James Cook The story behind the man who mapped the world by Peter FitzSimons

The name Captain James Cook is one of the most recognisable in Australian history - an almost mythic figure who is often discussed, celebrated, reviled and debated. But who was the real James Cook? This Yorkshire farm boy would go on to become the foremost mariner, scientist, navigator and cartographer of his era, and to personally map a third of the globe. His great voyages of discovery were incredible feats of seamanship and navigation. Leading a crew of men into uncharted territories, Cook would face the best and worst of humanity as he took himself and his crew to the edge of the known world - and beyond. With his masterful storytelling talent, Peter FitzSimons brings the real James Cook to life. Focusing on his most iconic expedition, the voyage of the Endeavour , where Cook first set foot on Australian and New Zealand soil, FitzSimons contrasts Cook against another figure who looms large in Australasian history: Joseph Banks, the aristocratic botanist. As they left England, Banks, a rich, famous playboy, was everything that Cook was not. The voyage tested Cook's character and would help define his legacy. Now, 240 years after James Cook's death, FitzSimons reveals what kind of man James was at heart. His strengths, his weaknesses, his passions and pursuits, failures and successes. James Cook reveals the man behind the myth.

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The Land Before Avocado - Richard Glover Cover Art

The Land Before Avocado

The Land Before Avocado by Richard Glover

The new book from the bestselling author of Flesh Wounds. A funny and frank look at the way Australia used to be - and just how far we have come. 'It was simpler time'. We had more fun back then'. 'Everyone could afford a house'. There's plenty of nostalgia right now for the Australia of the past, but what was it really like? In The Land Before Avocado, Richard Glover takes a journey to an almost unrecognisable Australia. It's a vivid portrait of a quite peculiar land: a place that is scary and weird, dangerous and incomprehensible, and, now and then, surprisingly appealing. It's the Australia of his childhood. The Australia of the late '60s and early '70s. Let's break the news now: they didn't have avocado. It's a place of funny clothing and food that was appalling, but amusingly so. It is also the land of staggeringly awful attitudes - often enshrined in law - towards anybody who didn't fit in. The Land Before Avocado will make you laugh and cry, feel angry and inspired. And leave you wondering how bizarre things were, not so long ago. Most of all, it will make you realise how far we've come - and how much further we can go. PRAISE Richard Glover's just-published The Land Before Avocado is a wonderful and witty journey back in time to life in the early 1970s. For a start, he deftly reclaims the book's title fruit from those who have positioned it as a proxy for all that is wrong with today's supposedly feckless and spendthrift young adults. Rather than maligning the avocado (and young people), he cleverly appropriates the fruit as an exemplar of how far we have come since the 1970s' Richard Wakelin, Australian Financial Review 'This is vintage Glover - warm, wise and very, very funny. Brimming with excruciating insights into life in the late sixties and early seventies, The Land Before Avocado explains why this was the cultural revolution we had to have' Hugh Mackay 'Hilarious and horrifying, this is the ultimate intergenerational conversation starter' Annabel Crabb PRAISE FOR FLESH WOUNDS 'A funny, moving, very entertaining memoir' Bill Bryson, New York Times 'The best Australian memoir I've read is Richard Glover's Flesh Wounds' Greg Sheridan, The Australian

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Contemporary Japan - Jeff Kingston Cover Art

Contemporary Japan

Contemporary Japan History, Politics, and Social Change since the 1980s by Jeff Kingston

The second edition of this comprehensive study of recent Japanese history now includes the author's expert assessment of the effects of the earthquake and tsunami, including the political and environmental consequences of the Fukushima reactor meltdown. Fully updated to include a detailed assessment of the aftermath of the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami Shows how the nuclear crisis at Fukushima was an accident waiting to happen Includes detailed discussion of Japan's energy policy, now in flux after the mishandling of the Fukushima crisis Analyzes Japan's 'Lost Decades', why jobs and families are less stable, environmental policies, immigration, the aging society, the US alliance, the imperial family, and the 'yakuza' criminal gangs Authoritative coverage of Japanese history over the last two decades, one of the country's most tumultuous periods

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Australian History in Seven Questions - John Hirst Cover Art

Australian History in Seven Questions

Australian History in Seven Questions by John Hirst

'If there are genuine questions about Australian history, there is something to puzzle over. The history ceases to be predictable— and dull.’ From the author of The Shortest History of Europe , acclaimed historian John Hirst, comes this fresh and stimulating approach to understanding Australia’s past and present. Hirst asks and answers questions that get to the heart of Australia’s history: • Why did Aborigines not take up farming? • How did a penal colony change peacefully into a democratic society? • Why was Australia so prosperous so early? • Why did the colonies federate? • What effect did convict origins have on national character? • Why was the postwar migration programme such a success? • Why is Australia not a republic? Engaging and enjoyable, and written for the novice and the expert alike, Australian History in Seven Questions explains how we became the nation we are today. “one of the nation’s most independent and original historians” – Geoffrey Blainey “John Hirst is the gadfly of Australian history, stinging and provocative” – Stuart Macintyre John Hirst was a member of the History Department at La Trobe University from 1968 to 2007. He has written many books on Australian history, including Convict Society and Its Enemies, The Strange Birth of Colonial Democracy, The Sentimental Nation, Sense and Nonsense in Australian History and The Shortest History of Europe.

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New Zealand Constitution - New Zealand Parliament Cover Art

New Zealand Constitution

New Zealand Constitution by New Zealand Parliament

The official constitution of the realm of New Zealand.

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Australia: A Very Short Introduction - Kenneth Morgan Cover Art

Australia: A Very Short Introduction

Australia: A Very Short Introduction by Kenneth Morgan

In this Very Short Introduction, Kenneth Morgan provides a wide-ranging and thematic introduction to modern Australia; examining the main features of its history, geography, and culture and drawing attention to the distinctive features of Australian life and its indigenous population and culture.

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A History of China - Morris Rossabi Cover Art

A History of China

A History of China by Morris Rossabi

Capturing China’s past in all its complexity, this multi-faceted history portrays China in the context of a larger global world, while incorporating the narratives of Chinese as well as non-Chinese ethnic groups and discussing people traditionally left out of the story—peasants, women, merchants, and artisans. Offers a complete political, economic, social, and cultural history of China, covering the major events and trends Written in a clear and uncomplicated style by a distinguished historian with over four decades of experience teaching undergraduates Examines Chinese history through the lens of global history to better understand how foreign influences affected domestic policies and practices Depicts the role of non-Chinese ethnic groups in China, such as Tibetans and Uyghurs, and analyzes the Mongol and Manchu rulers and their impact on Chinese society Incorporates the narratives of people traditionally left out of Chinese history, including women, peasants, merchants, and artisans

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Black Snake - Leo Kennedy & Mic Looby Cover Art

Black Snake

Black Snake by Leo Kennedy & Mic Looby

Author Leo Kennedy is the great-grandson of Sergeant Michael Kennedy. Raised in the shadow of his great-grandfather’s murder, Leo witnessed the deep psychological wounds inflicted on successive generations of his family – and the families of other victims – as the Ned Kelly myth grew around them and the sacrifice of their loved ones was forgotten. Leo himself was nicknamed ‘Red Ned’ at school and taunted for being on the wrong side of Australian history.Now, for the first time, and in brilliant prose that brings these historical episodes to life, Black Snake challenges the legend of Ned Kelly. Instead of celebrating an heroic man of the people, it gives voice to the victims of a merciless gang of outlaws. This is a captivating true story, gleaned from meticulous research and family history, of two men from similar backgrounds whose legacies were distorted by history.

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The Colony - Grace Karskens Cover Art

The Colony

The Colony A History of Early Sydney by Grace Karskens

The Colony is the story of the marvellously contrary, endlessly energetic early years of Sydney. It is an intimate account of the transformation of a campsite in a beautiful cove to the town that later became Australia's largest and best-known city.From the sparkling beaches to the foothills of the Blue Mountains, Grace Karskens skilfully reveals how landscape shaped the lives of the original Aboriginal inhabitants and newcomers alike. She traces the ways in which relationships between the colonial authorities and ordinary men and women broke with old patterns, and the ways that settler and Aboriginal histories became entwined. She uncovers the ties between the burgeoning township and its rural hinterland expanding along the river systems of the Cumberland Plain.This is a landmark account of the birthplace of modern Australia, and a fascinating and richly textured narrative of people and place. 'This is a spellbinding saga of the beginnings of modern Australia. The Colony is a stunning achievement. It will change the way you feel about Australian history.' - Professor Tom Griffiths, Australian National University

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New Zealand The Perfect Beginner's Traveling Guide For The Best And Most Amazing Things To Explore In New Zealand! - FLLC Travel Guides & Mindy Maddison Cover Art

New Zealand The Perfect Beginner's Traveling Guide For The Best And Most Amazing Things To Explore In New Zealand!

New Zealand The Perfect Beginner's Traveling Guide For The Best And Most Amazing Things To Explore In New Zealand! by FLLC Travel Guides & Mindy Maddison

An Awesome Guide To Touring New Zealand And Making This Trip The Best EVER! Here's What You Will Learn Inside This Marvelous E-book! The Best Things To Do In New Zealand Traveling Experiences that You Won't want to Miss Hiking Properly In New Zealand At The Best Places Wellington The Maori Cultural Shows and Rotorua Cities That Everyone Should See! Cool Attractions in New Zealand

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The Stolen Island - Scott Hamilton Cover Art

The Stolen Island

The Stolen Island Searching for 'Ata by Scott Hamilton

‘What had happened to the stolen islanders? Had any survived slavery?’ One day in 1863 a strange ship stopped at ‘Ata, a tiny island in the wild seas between Tonga and New Zealand, and sailed away with one hundred and forty-four men, women and children. The ‘Atans were never heard from again, and in Tonga their fate became the subject of legends and superstitions. Uncovering the tragedy of ‘Ata takes Scott Hamilton on a journey to the kava circles and caves of Tonga and back to the streets of Auckland. The Stolen Island is a twenty-first century true sea story revealing slavers, mutinies, castaways, pirates and a cruel streak in Pacific history that is often overlooked but not forgotten.

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The South Pole (Illustrated) - Roald Amundsen Cover Art

The South Pole (Illustrated)

The South Pole (Illustrated) (Complete Volume I & II) by Roald Amundsen

Roald Amundsen records his race to be the first man to reach the South Pole. Amundsen's expertise enabled him to succeed where his predecessors, and competitors, did not. His rival Captain Robert F. Scott not only failed to reach the Pole first, but—due to poor preparation and miscalculation—died with the rest of his party on their return trip. The South Pole remains one of the greatest and most important books on polar exploration. Review - 'Roald Amundsen planted the Norwegian flag on the South Pole on December 14, 1911: a full month before Robert Falcon Scott arrived on the same spot. Amundsen's The South Pole (Hurst) is less well-known than his rivals, in part because he is less of a literary stylist, but also, perhaps, because he survived the journey. His book is a riveting first-hand account of a truly professional expedition; Amundsen's heroism is understated, but it is heroism nonetheless.' -Erica Wagner, The Times'Amundsen was the supreme exponent of Polar technique. He towered above his rivals; he brought an intellectual approach to exploration and stood, as he still stands, the antipole to the heroic delusion. [A...] The journey to the South Pole remains his masterpiece, the culmination of the classical age of Polar exploration and, perhaps, the greatest snow journey ever made.' -Roland Huntford, The Last Place on Earth: Scott and Amundsen's Race to the South Pole..

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Great Tales from New Zealand History - Gordon McLauchlan Cover Art

Great Tales from New Zealand History

Great Tales from New Zealand History by Gordon McLauchlan

An intriguing collection of tales plucked from the byways of New Zealand’s history by a master storyteller who recognises a good yarn when he sees it. Gordon McLauchlan tempts our imagination with 46 little-known tales from the past. Here you will discover: - that Auckland applied twice to the Colonial Office to be a separate colony from the rest of New Zealand - more about the man who wanted to be James Cook - when drinking beer legally became an ‘art’ on the West Coast - whether Kupe was man or myth - how Hawera seceded and became a republic - when and why the Americans planned to invade New Zealand - which aviation heroine was called a ‘naughty girl who deserved a spanking’ - why a posse of politicians committed suicide . . . and more. This great collection of tales explores these and many more questions and issues which have fascinated New Zealanders and filled many a page in many a history book over the years. Gordon McLauchlan brings a fresh perspective on some old and often vexed periods in New Zealand’s history.

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1788 - Watkin Tench Cover Art

1788

1788 Text Classics by Watkin Tench

In 1788 Watkin Tench stepped ashore at Botany Bay with the First Fleet. This curious young captain of the marines was an effortless storyteller. His account of the infant colony, introduced by Tim Flannery, is the first classic of Australian literature. On leaving England, Tench was commissioned by the publisher John Debrett of Piccadilly to write a book about his adventures. In fact he wrote two. A Narrative of the Expedition to Botany Bay was published in 1789, and A Complete Account of the Settlement at Port Jackson in 1793. They are both included in full in this edition of 1788 . Watkin Tench was born around 1758 in Chester, England. He joined the marine corps in 1776 and served in the American War of Independence before sailing to Botany Bay with the First Fleet. Tench returned to England in 1792. He stayed with the marine corps before retiring as a lieutenant-general in 1821. Tench died in 1833. Tim Flannery is a bestselling writer, scientist and explorer. He has published over a dozen books, most recently Among the Islands: Adventures in the Pacific . In 2011 he was appointed chief commissioner of the Australian Climate Commission. textclassics.com.au 'Tench will always remain the classic contemporary witness of our beginnings.' Les Murray ‘Don’t for a minute believe that Australian history is a bore. This is a marvellous read.’ Sun Herald ‘Tench’s work is a stunning time machine: he takes us back to the promise and disaster at the beginning of our nation’s story; and we stand at the edge of history, laughing and crying.’ Chloe Hooper ‘Tench is a most charming man of the Enlightenment, and his journal is similarly by far the most disarming and enthusiastic of the First Fleet journals. Where others damned the place, he showed curiosity.’ Thomas Keneally 'I fell in love with Tench, as most of his readers do. He is a Boswell on the page: curious, ardent, gleefully self-mocking. He didn’t fit my image of a stiff-lipped British imperialist at all.’ Inga Clendinnen 'His record sparkles with precision, each word so apt.' Marcia Langton

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An Awkward Truth - Peter Grose Cover Art

An Awkward Truth

An Awkward Truth The Bombing of Darwin, February 1942 by Peter Grose

Darwin was a battle Australia would rather forget. Yet the Japanese attack on 19 February 1942 was the first wartime assault on Australian soil. The Japanese struck with the same carrier-borne force that devastated Pearl Harbor only ten weeks earlier. There was a difference. More bombs fell on Darwin, more civilians were killed, and more ships were sunk. The raid led to the worst death toll from any event in Australia. The attackers bombed and strafed three hospitals, flattened shops, offices and the police barracks, shattered the Post Office and communications centre, wrecked Government House, and left the harbour and airfields burning and ruined. The people of Darwin abandoned their town, leaving it to looters, a few anti-aircraft batteries and a handful of dogged defenders with single-shot .303 rifles. Yet the story has remained in the shadows. Drawing on long-hidden documents and first-person accounts, Peter Grose tells what really happened and takes us into the lives of the people who were there. There was much to be proud of in Darwin that day: courage, mateship, determination and improvisation. But the dark side of the story involves looting, desertion and a calamitous failure of leadership. Australians ran away because they did not know what else to do.  Absorbing, spirited and fast-paced, An Awkward Truth is a compelling and revealing story of the day war really came to Australia, and the motley bunch of soldiers and civilians who were left to defend the nation.

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1835 - James Boyce Cover Art

1835

1835 The Founding of Melbourne and the Conquest of Australia by James Boyce

With the founding of Melbourne in 1835, a flood of settlers began spreading out across the Australian continent. In three years more land – and more people – was conquered than in the preceding fifty. In 1835 James Boyce brings this pivotal moment to life. He traces the power plays in Hobart, Sydney and London, and describes the key personalities of Melbourne’s early days. He conjures up the Australian frontier – its complexity, its rawness and the way its legacy is still with us today. And he asks the poignant question largely ignored for 175 years: could it have been different? With his first book, Van Diemen’s Land , Boyce introduced an utterly fresh approach to the nation’s history. ‘In re-imagining Australia’s past,’ Richard Flanagan wrote, ‘it invents a new future.’ 1835 continues this untold story.

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International Harvester - Graeme R. Quick Cover Art

International Harvester

International Harvester Tractors & Equipment in Australian & New Zealand by Graeme R. Quick

This book comprehensively documents the International Harvester Company’s activities from its inception to its merger with Case as Case IH and their influence in Australia and New Zealand. IHC began with a merger of harvesting machinery companies to for the International Trust, the world’s biggest farm machinery enterprise at the time. Then IHC became involved with tractors to become the world’s largest tractor and full-line machinery maker, setting production records that stand to this day.

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Convict Colony - David Hill Cover Art

Convict Colony

Convict Colony The Remarkable Story Of The Fledgling Settlement That Survived Against The Odds by David Hill

The British plan to settle Australia was a high-risk venture. We now take it for granted that the first colony was the basis of one of the most successful nations in the world today. But in truth, the New World of the 18th century was dotted with failed colonies, and New South Wales nearly joined them.  The motley crew of unruly marines and bedraggled convicts who arrived at Botany Bay in 1788 in leaky boats nearly starved to death. They could easily have been murdered by hostile locals, been overwhelmed by an attack from French or Spanish expeditions, or brought undone by the Castle Hill uprising of 1804. Yet through fortunate decisions, a few remarkably good leaders, and most of all good luck, Sydney survived and thrived. Bestselling historian David Hill tells the story of the first three decades of Britain's earliest colony in Australia in a fresh and compelling way. 'David Hill captures Australia's past in a very readable way.' The Weekly Times David Hill is the author of eight books, including the bestselling 1788: The Brutal Truth of the First Fleet , The Forgotten Children, The Great Race and The Making of Australia . He has held numerous executive appointments in his long and successful career, including as managing director of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, chairman of the Australian Football Association, and chief executive of the State Rail Authority. Since 2011 he has been the manager of an archaeological study of the ancient Greek city of Troizen.

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The Catalpa Rescue - Peter FitzSimons Cover Art

The Catalpa Rescue

The Catalpa Rescue The gripping story of the most dramatic and successful prison break in Australian history by Peter FitzSimons

The incredible true story of one of the most extraordinary and inspirational prison breaks in Australian history. New York, 1874. Members of the Clan-na-Gael - agitators for Irish freedom from the English yoke - hatch a daring plan to free six Irish political prisoners from the most remote prison in the British Empire, Fremantle Prison in Western Australia. Under the guise of a whale hunt, Captain Anthony sets sail on the Catalpa to rescue the men from the stone walls of this hell on Earth known to the inmates as a 'living tomb'. What follows is one of history's most stirring sagas that splices Irish, American, British and Australian history together in its climactic moment. For Ireland, who had suffered English occupation for 700 years, a successful escape was an inspirational call to arms. For America, it was a chance to slap back at Britain for their support of the South in the Civil War; for England, a humiliation. And for a young Australia, still not sure if it was Great Britain in the South Seas or worthy of being an independent country in its own right, it was proof that Great Britain was not unbeatable. Told with FitzSimons' trademark combination of arresting history and storytelling verve, The Catalpa Rescue is a tale of courage and cunning, the fight for independence and the triumph of good men, against all odds.

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Murder, Misadventure and Miserable Ends - Dr Catie Gilchrist Cover Art

Murder, Misadventure and Miserable Ends

Murder, Misadventure and Miserable Ends Tales from a Colonial Coroner's Court by Dr Catie Gilchrist

Murder, manslaughter, suicide, mishap - the very public business of determining death in colonial Sydney. Murder in colonial Sydney was a surprisingly rare occurrence, so when it did happen it caused a great sensation. People flocked to the scene of the crime, to the coroner's court and to the criminal courts to catch a glimpse of the accused. Most of us today rarely see a dead body. In nineteenth century Sydney, when health was precarious and workplaces and the busy city streets were often dangerous, witnessing a death was rather common. And any death that was sudden or suspicious would be investigated by the coroner. Henry Shiell was the Sydney City Coroner from 1866 to 1889. In the course of his unusually long career he delved into the lives, loves, crimes, homes and workplaces of colonial Sydneysiders. He learnt of envies, infidelities, passions, and loyalties, and just how short, sad and violent some lives were. But his court was also, at times, instrumental in calling for new laws and regulations to make life safer. Catie Gilchrist explores the nineteenth century city as a precarious place of bustling streets and rowdy hotels, harbourside wharves and dangerous industries. With few safety regulations, the colourful city was also a place of frequent inquests, silent morgues and solemn graveyards. This is the story of life and death in colonial Sydney. PRAISE 'Catie Gilchrist draws back the veil on death in nineteenth-century Sydney to reveal life - ordinary, tragic and hopeful' David Hunt, author of Girt and True Girt

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Bligh - Anne Salmond Cover Art

Bligh

Bligh William Bligh in the South Seas by Anne Salmond

In Bligh, the story of the most notorious of all Pacific explorers is told through a new lens as a significant episode in the history of the world, not simply of the West. Award-winning anthropologist Anne Salmond recounts the triumphs and disasters of William Bligh's life and career in a riveting narrative that for the first time portrays the Pacific islanders as key players. From 1777, Salmond charts Bligh's three Pacific voyages – with Captain James Cook in the Resolution, on board the Bounty, and as commander of the Providence. Salmond offers new insights into the mutiny aboard the Bounty – and on Bligh's extraordinary 3000-mile journey across the Pacific in a small boat – through new revelations from unguarded letters between him and his wife Betsy. We learn of their passionate relationship, and her unstinting loyalty throughout the trials of his turbulent career and his fight to clear his name. This beautifully told story reveals Bligh as an important ethnographer, adding to the paradoxical legacy of the famed seaman. For the first time, we hear how Bligh and his men were changed by their experiences in the South Seas, and how in turn they changed that island world forever. 'Remarkable . . . The mutiny has inspired some marvellous books, of which this is possibly the finest.' --Jim Eagles, New Zealand Herald

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D-Day New Guinea - Phillip Bradley Cover Art

D-Day New Guinea

D-Day New Guinea The Extraordinary Story Of The Battle For Lae And The Greatest Combined Airborne And Amphibious Operation Of The Pacific War by Phillip Bradley

'Java is heaven, Burma is hell, but you never come back alive from New Guinea' - Japanese military saying The capture of Lae was the most complex operation for the Australian army in the Second World War. In many ways it was also a rehearsal for the D-Day invasion of France, with an amphibious landing combined with the first successful large-scale Allied airborne operation of the war. D-Day New Guinea brings together the extraordinary stories of the Australian, American and Japanese participants in this battle, and of the fight against the cloying jungle, the raging rivers and the soaring mountain ranges that made New Guinea such a daunting battlefield.  Phillip Bradley brings a compelling clarity, humanity and new insight into a little known but crucial Australian battle of the Pacific War.

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The House - Helen Pitt Cover Art

The House

The House The Dramatic Story Of The Sydney Opera House And The People Who Made It by Helen Pitt

Winner of the 2018 Walkley Book Award The best-loved building in Australia nearly didn't get off the drawing board. When it did, the lives of everyone involved in its construction were utterly changed: some for the better, many for the worse. Helen Pitt tells the stories of the people behind the magnificent white sails of the Sydney Opera House. From the famous conductor and state premier who conceived the project; to the two architects whose lives were so tragically intertwined; to the workers and engineers; to the people of Sydney, who were alternately beguiled and horrified as the drama unfolded over two decades. With access to diaries, letters, and classified records, as well as her own interviews with people involved in the project, Helen Pitt reveals the intimate back story of the building that turned Sydney into an international city. It is a tale worthy of Shakespeare himself. 'A drama-filled page turner' - Ita Buttrose AO OBE 'Helen Pitt tells us so much about the building of the Sydney Opera House we've never heard before' - Bob Carr, former Premier of NSW 'Australia in the seventies: mullets, platform shoes and, miraculously, the Opera House. At least we got one of them right. A great read.' - Amanda Keller, WSFM breakfast presenter 

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Beneath Hill 60 - Will Davies Cover Art

Beneath Hill 60

Beneath Hill 60 by Will Davies

The story of the Australian miners and soldiers who tunnelled under Hill 60 near Ypres and eventually broke through to create a new frontline. On 7 June 1917, 19 massive mines shattered the Messines ridge near Ypres. Ten thousand German soldiers died and the largest man-made explosion in history up until that time smashed open the German frontline. Two of these mines, at Hill 60 and the Caterpillar, were fired my men of the 1st Australian Tunnelling Company, made up of miners and engineers rather than parade-ground soldiers. This is the untold, devastatingly brutal story of the battle underground during the First World War, where men suffocated in the blue-grey clay, drowned in the liquid chalk, choked on the poisonous air or died violently in the darkness and foetid air in hand-to-hand fighting. Written by Will Davies, bestselling author of Somme Mud and In The Footsteps of Private Lynch , Beneath Hill 60 tells the complete and inspiring story behind the major motion picture.

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Larrikins in Khaki - Tim Bowden Cover Art

Larrikins in Khaki

Larrikins in Khaki Tales Of Irreverence And Courage From World War II Diggers by Tim Bowden

With a reputation for being hard to discipline, generosity to their comrades, frankness and sticking it up any sign of pomposity, Australian soldiers were a wild and irreverent lot, even in the worst of circumstances during World War II. In Larrikins in Khaki , Tim Bowden has collected compelling and vivid stories of individual soldiers whose memoirs were mostly self-published and who told of their experiences with scant regard for literary pretensions and military niceties. Most of these men had little tolerance for military order and discipline, and NCOs and officers who were hopeless at their jobs were made aware of it. They laughed their way through the worst of it by taking the mickey out of one another and their superiors.  From recruitment and training to the battlegrounds of Palestine, North Africa, Thailand, New Guinea, Borneo and beyond, here are the highly individual stories of Australia's World War II Diggers told in their own voices - warts and all.

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The Original Australians - Josephine Flood Cover Art

The Original Australians

The Original Australians The Story Of The Aboriginal People by Josephine Flood

The Original Australians tells the story of Australian Aboriginal history and society from its distant beginnings to the present day. From the wisdom and paintings of the Dreamtime to the first contact between Europeans and Indigenous Australians, through to the Uluru Statement, it offers an insight into the life and experiences of the world's oldest surviving culture. The resilience and adaptability of Aboriginal people over millennia is one of the great human stories of all time.  Josephine Flood answers the questions that Australians and visitors often ask about Aboriginal Australia: Where did the Aboriginal people come from and when? How did they survive in Australia's harsh environment? What was the traditional role of indigenous women? What are land rights? How do Aboriginal people maintain their culture today? And many more.  This bestselling account has been updated and is fascinating reading for anyone who wants to discover Aboriginal Australia.  '. . . an intriguing and accessible history for anyone, from overseas visitors to Australians . . .' Sydney Morning Herald  'This is the best book to give someone who wants to know about Aborigines, their survival through the millennia, and the experiences they have to contribute to modern Australia.' Emeritus Professor Campbell Macknight, Australian National University  Dr Josephine Flood is a prominent archaeologist, recipient of the Centenary Medal and former director of the Aboriginal Heritage section of the Australian Heritage Commission. She is the author of the influential Archaeology of the Dreamtime and The Riches of Ancient Australia .

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Pacific Ways - Stephen Levine Cover Art

Pacific Ways

Pacific Ways Government and Politics in the Pacific Islands by Stephen Levine

Examining the politics of each Pacific Island state and territory, this well-researched volume discusses historical background and colonial experience, constitutional framework, political institutions, political parties, elections and electoral systems, and problems and prospects. Pacific Island countries and territories included are the original seven member states—New Zealand, Australia, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga, Nauru, and the Cook Islands—along with all the new member states and organizations. A wide-ranging political survey, this comprehensive and completely up to date reference will appeal to Pacific peoples and anyone with an interest in politics.

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The Best Australian Trucking Stories - Jim Haynes Cover Art

The Best Australian Trucking Stories

The Best Australian Trucking Stories by Jim Haynes

The trucker's job-so vital to our nation's everyday life-makes for a diverse treasure trove of stories. This first-ever collection of stories about Aussie truckers captures the humour, tragedy and fascinating history of their world, proving once again that truth is often stranger, funnier and more inspiring than fiction. The unlikely yarns and tales, collected by Jim Haynes, quickly transport the reader into the intriguing but often hard and lonely world of the long-distance truck driver. There are stories of endurance while crossing the Nullarbor in the early 1950s, of rescuing mates stranded in the desert and dumping wheat in protest at Parliament House, of repossessing vehicles in suburban Adelaide, and of men imprisoned during the long political battle to make the roads of Australia free to carry freight. Steeped in larrikinism, these are salt-of-the-earth Aussie voices from the most genuine characters to ever spin a yarn. Whether you're interested in one of the most significant social revolutions to have shaped our nation, or in these never-say-die modern pioneers who astound with their resourcefulness, or whether you're just after a laugh and a bloody good story, this book is for you.

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Captain Thunderbolt and His Lady - Carol Baxter Cover Art

Captain Thunderbolt and His Lady

Captain Thunderbolt and His Lady The True Story of Bushrangers Frederick Ward and Mary Ann Bugg by Carol Baxter

He was the gentleman bushranger ... she was the woman who rode with him. This is the true story of Captain Thunderbolt and his lady. 'Bail up!' demanded Captain Thunderbolt before he shouted the bar with the inn keeper's own profits. Driven into banditry by injustice, this colonial Robin Hood, magnificent horseman and skilled bushman was celebrated by his victims as vigorously as he was hunted by the law. She was his chief lieutenant, his eyes and his ears. Intelligent and beautiful, Mary Ann Bugg dressed as a man, rode like a man, and helped keep Thunderbolt ahead of the troopers and trackers intent on pursuing him to his end. Until one day... Compellingly written and richly detailed, Captain Thunderbolt and His Lady has it all - action, drama, and two protagonists who defied social conventions for freedom. This is an unputdownable story of an extraordinary partnership and a fresh retelling of one of Australia's greatest bushranging stories. 'What a well-written, cracking read.' - Emeritus Professor Bruce Kercher

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The History of Tasmania, volume 1 of 2 - John West Cover Art

The History of Tasmania, volume 1 of 2

The History of Tasmania, volume 1 of 2 by John West

According to Wikipedia: "Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a country in the southern hemisphere comprising the mainland of the world's smallest continent, the major island of Tasmania, and numerous other islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.N4 Neighbouring countries include Indonesia, East Timor, and Papua New Guinea to the north, the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, and New Caledonia to the north-east, and New Zealand to the south-east. For around 40,000 years before European settlement commenced in the late 18th century, the Australian mainland and Tasmania were inhabited by around 250 individual nations of indigenous Australians.[8] After sporadic visits by fishermen from the immediate north, and European discovery by Dutch explorers in 1606,[9] the eastern half of Australia was claimed by the British in 1770 and initially settled through penal transportation to the colony of New South Wales, founded on 26 January 1788. The population grew steadily in the following years; the continent was explored, and during the 19th century another five largely self-governing Crown Colonies were established. On 1 January 1901, the six colonies became a federation, and the Commonwealth of Australia was formed. Since Federation, Australia has maintained a stable liberal democratic political system and remains a Commonwealth realm. The population is just over 21.3 million, with approximately 60% concentrated in and around the mainland state capitals of Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide. The nation's capital city is Canberra, located in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). Technologically advanced and industrialised, Australia is a prosperous nation and has good results in many international comparisons of national performance such as health care, life expectancy, quality-of-life, human development, public education, economic freedom, and the protection of civil liberties and political rights."

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Searching for Charlotte - Kate Forsyth & Belinda Murrell Cover Art

Searching for Charlotte

Searching for Charlotte The Fascinating Story of Australia’s First Children’s by Kate Forsyth & Belinda Murrell

*Longlisted for the 2021 Indie Book Awards: Non-Fiction* In  Searching for Charlotte , Forsyth and Murrell tell Charlotte's story along with that of their own journey to discover her. In an intriguing account, the sisters join the reader in reacting to Charlotte's actions: wondering what could have motivated certain choices; admiring the strength of spirit that pushed Charlotte through turmoil in the Australian colonies; and reviling attitudes that were common to the mid-1800s but are abhorrent in the twentieth century. The extraordinary, long-buried life story of Australia's earliest published children's author,  Searching for Charlotte  combines elements of biography, recreation of history and rediscovery of family history. It is a sometimes confronting but ultimately heartwarming journey into the story of a family with writing in its blood.

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The Other Side of the Mountain - Ian W Shaw Cover Art

The Other Side of the Mountain

The Other Side of the Mountain How a Tycoon, a Pastoralist and a Convict Helped Shape the Exploration of Colonial Australia by Ian W Shaw

In the early 1800s the Great Australian Unknown would be slowly revealed, in part by formal government expeditions, but also by runaway convicts, little known and privately funded explorers, and pastoralists seeking both knowledge of what lay beyond and land to occupy. Through extensive research, and with engaging storytelling, The Other Side of the Mountain brings three of these men’s stories together into a single enthralling narrative: Ralph Entwistle, runaway convict and bushranger who led a brief and briefly successful rebellion against the brutality of the convict system on the fringes of New South Wales’ western plains; John Horrocks, an English textiles magnate who brought most of his village from the north of England to Adelaide and beyond, and who was the first to explore Australia’s parched interior by camel - a decision that cost him his life; and Horace Wills, a printer, rebel, overlander, pastoralist and politician who gave up everything to push the frontier back in the far north of the continent. While our history books recount the momentous advances made when Europeans spread across the continent, the stories of Ralph Entwistle, John Horrocks and Horace Wills are a reminder that those advances were almost always built on smaller endeavours, often made by people whose names we rarely hear today but whose impacts were often of the greatest significance.

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A History of South Australia - Paul Sendziuk & Robert Foster Cover Art

A History of South Australia

A History of South Australia by Paul Sendziuk & Robert Foster

A History of South Australia investigates South Australia's history from before the arrival of the first European maritime explorers to the present day, and examines its distinctive origins as a 'free' settlement. In this compelling and nuanced history, Paul Sendziuk and Robert Foster consider the imprint of people on the land – and vice versa – and offer fresh insights into relations between Indigenous people and the European colonisers. They chart South Australia's economic, political and social development, including the advance and retreat of an interventionist government, the establishment of the state's distinctive socio-political formations, and its relationship to the rest of Australia and the world. The first comprehensive, single-volume history of the state to be published in over fifty years, A History of South Australia is an essential and engaging contribution to our understanding of South Australia's past.

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Tracy - Gary McKay Cover Art

Tracy

Tracy The Storm That Wiped Out Darwin on Christmas Day 1974 by Gary McKay

Thirty years ago, on Christmas Day 1974, Australia woke up to the news that Darwin had been devastated by Cyclone Tracy . Only hours before, the town of Darwin was winding down for the holiday season. Like many people that day, Josephine Foreman spent the morning cooking a large turkey for Christmas lunch; Geoff Crane took the opportunity to finish some last-minute Christmas shopping. Reports of an approaching cyclone were taken lightly-after all, the last cyclone had been little more than a storm with a bit more wind. Besides, it was Christmas .  At midnight on Christmas Eve, Cyclone Tracy roared in from the Arafura Sea and in six hours wiped out Darwin. It was Australia's worst natural disaster-a night of fear and horror, a storm of unprecedented savagery and destruction.  Winds of 300 kilometres per hour totally destroyed nearly all of Darwin's buildings and caused the deaths of more than fifty people. When Christmas Day finally dawned, many counted themselves lucky to still be alive.  Thirty years later, some of those who lived through the cyclone's devastation recall their frightening experiences-from the sheer terror of the storm itself, to the heart-wrenching days that followed and the mass clean-up operation and evacuation of more than 20,000 people in six days. This is a compelling account of tragedy, survival and human courage.

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Tupuna Awa - Marama Muru-Lanning Cover Art

Tupuna Awa

Tupuna Awa People and Politics of the Waikato River by Marama Muru-Lanning

'We have always owned the water . . . we have never ceded our mana over the river to anyone’, King Tuheitia Paki asserted in 2012. Prime Minister John Key disagreed: ‘King Tuheitia’s claim that Maori have always owned New Zealand’s water is just plain wrong’. So who does own the water in New Zealand – if anyone – and why does it matter? Offering some human context around that fraught question, Tupuna Awa looks at the people and politics of the Waikato River. For iwi and hapu of the lands that border its 425-kilometre length, the Waikato River is an ancestor, a taonga and a source of mauri, lying at the heart of identity and chiefly power. It is also subject to governing oversight by the Crown and intersected by hydro-stations managed by state-owned power companies: a situation rife with complexity and subject to shifting and subtle power dynamics. Marama Muru-Lanning explains how Maori of the region, the Crown and Mighty River Power have talked about the ownership, guardianship and stakeholders of the river. By examining the debates over water in one New Zealand river, over a single recent period, Muru-Lanning provides a powerful lens through which to view modern iwi politics, debates over water ownership, and contests for power between Maori and the state.

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The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka - Clare Wright Cover Art

The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka

The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka by Clare Wright

Winner of the Stella Prize, 2014. The Eureka Stockade. The story is one of Australia's foundation legends, but until now it has been told as though only half the participants were there. What if the hot-tempered, free-wheeling gold miners we learnt about in school were actually husbands and fathers, brothers and sons? And what if there were women and children inside the Eureka Stockade, defending their rights while defending themselves against a barrage of bullets? As Clare Wright reveals, there were thousands of women on the goldfields and many of them were active in pivotal roles. The stories of how they arrived there, why they came and how they sustained themselves make for fascinating reading in their own right. But it is in the rebellion itself that the unbiddable women of Ballarat come into their own. Groundbreaking, absorbing, crucially important , The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka is the uncut story of the day the Australian people found their voice. Clare Wright is an historian who has worked as a political speechwriter, university lecturer, historical consultant and radio and television broadcaster. Her first book, Beyond the Ladies Lounge: Australia's Female Publicans , garnered both critical and popular acclaim. She researched, wrote and presented the ABC television documentary Utopia Girls and is currently writing a four-part series to commemorate the centenary of WWI for ABC1. She lives in Melbourne with her husband and three children. textpublishing.com.au 'Lively, incisive and timely, Clare Wright's account of the role of women in the Eureka Stockade is an engrossing read. Assembling a tapestry of voices that vividly illuminate the hardscrabble lives endured on Ballarat's muddy goldfields, this excellent book reveals a concealed facet of one of Australia's most famous incidences of colonial rebellion. For once, Peter Lalor isn't the hero: it's the women who are placed front and centre... The Forgotten Rebels links the actions of its heroines to the later fight for female suffrage, and will be of strong relevance to a contemporary female audience. Comprehensive and full of colour, this book will also be essential reading for devotees of Australian history.' Bookseller and Publisher 'This is a wonderful book. At last an Australian foundation story where women are not only found, but are found to have played a fundamental role.' Chris Masters 'Brilliantly researched and fun to read. An exhilarating new take on a story we thought we knew.' Brenda Niall 'Fascinating revelations. Beautifully told.' Peter FitzSimons ‘The best source on women at Eureka.’ Big Smoke

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