Top Australia History Ebooks

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1

The Fatal Shore - Robert Hughes Cover Art

The Fatal Shore

The Fatal Shore The epic of Australia's founding by Robert Hughes

In this bestselling account of the colonization of Australia, Robert Hughes explores how the convict transportation system created the country we know today. Digging deep into the dark history of England's infamous efforts to move 160,000 men and women thousands of miles to the other side of the world in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Hughes has crafted a groundbreaking, definitive account of the settling of Australia. Tracing the European presence in Australia from early explorations through the rise and fall of the penal colonies, and featuring 16 pages of illustrations and 3 maps, The Fatal Shore brings to life the incredible true history of a country we thought we knew.

2

The Tin Ticket - Deborah J. Swiss Cover Art

The Tin Ticket

The Tin Ticket The Heroic Journey of Australia's Convict Women by Deborah J. Swiss

Historian Deborah J. Swiss tells the heartbreaking, horrifying, and ultimately triumphant story of the women exiled from the British Isles and forced into slavery and savagery-who created the most liberated society of their time. Agnes McMillan and Janet Houston were convicted for shoplifting. Bridget Mulligan stole a bucket of milk; Widow Ludlow Tedder, eleven spoons. For their crimes, they would be sent not to jail, but to ships teeming with other female convicts. Tin tickets, stamped with numbers, were hung around the women's necks, and the ships set out to carry them to their new home: Van Diemen's Land, later known as Tasmania, part of the British Empire's crown jewel, Australia. Men outnumbered women nine to one there, and few "proper" citizens were interested in emigrating. The deportation of thousands of petty criminals-the vast majority nonviolent first offenders-provided a convenient solution for the government. Crossing Shark-infested waters, some died in shipwrecks during the four-month journey, or succumbed to infections and were sent to a watery grave. Others were impregnated against their will by their captors. They arrived as nothing more than property. But incredibly, as the years passed, they managed not only to endure their privation and pain but to thrive on their own terms, breaking the chains of bondage, and forging a society that treated women as equals and led the world in women's rights. The Tin Ticket takes us to the dawn of the nineteenth century and into the lives of Agnes McMillan, whose defiance and resilience carried her to a far more dramatic rebellion; Agnes's best friend Janet Houston, who rescued her from the Glasgow wynds and was also transported to Van Diemen's Land; Ludlow Tedder, forced to choose just one of her four children to accompany her to the other side of the world; Bridget Mulligan, who gave birth to a line of powerful women stretching to the present day. It also tells the tale of Elizabeth Gurney Fry, a Quaker reformer who touched all their lives. Ultimately, it is the story of women discarded by their homeland and forgotten by history-who, by sheer force of will, become the heart and soul of a new nation.

3

A Commonwealth of Thieves - Thomas Keneally Cover Art

A Commonwealth of Thieves

A Commonwealth of Thieves by Thomas Keneally

In this spirited history of the remarkable first four years of the convict settlement of Australia, Thomas Keneally offers us a human view of a fascinating piece of history. Combining the authority of a renowned historian with a brilliant narrative flair, Keneally gives us an inside view of this unprecedented experiment from the perspective of the new colony’s governor, Arthur Phillips. Using personal journals and documents, Keneally re-creates the hellish overseas voyage and the challenges Phillips faced upon arrival: unruly convicts, disgruntled officers, bewildered and hostile natives, food shortages, and disease. He also offers captivating portrayals of Aborigines and of convict settlers who were determined to begin their lives anew. A Commonwealth of Thieves immerses us in the fledgling penal colony and conjures up the thrills and hardships of those first four improbable years. From the Trade Paperback edition.

4

Girt - David Hunt Cover Art

Girt

Girt The Unauthorised History of Australia by David Hunt

Girt. No word could better capture the essence of Australia... In this hilarious history, David Hunt tells the real story of Australia's past from megafauna to Macquarie ... the cock-ups and curiosities, the forgotten eccentrics and Eureka moments that have made us who we are. Mark Twain wrote of Australian history: 'It does not read like history, but like the most beautiful lies ... but they are all true, they all happened.' In Girt , Hunt uncovers these beautiful lies, recounting the strange and ridiculous episodes that conventional histories ignore. The result is surprising, enlightening – and side-splittingly funny. Girt explains the role of the coconut in Australia's only military coup, the Dutch obsession with nailing perfectly good kitchenware to posts, and the settlers' fear of Pemulwuy and his Amazing Technicolor Dreamingcoat. It introduces us to forgotten heroes like Mary McLoghlin, transported for the typically Irish crime of 'felony of sock'; Patyegarang, the young Eora girl who co-authored the world's most surprising dictionary; and Trim the cat, who beat a French monkey to become the first animal to circumnavigate Australia. Our nation's beginnings were steeped in the unlikely, the incongruous and the frankly bizarre. Girt restores these stories to their rightful place. Not to read it would be un-Australian. David Hunt is an unusually tall and handsome man who likes writing his own bios for all the books he has written (one).

5

A Short History of New Zealand - Gordon McLauchlan Cover Art

A Short History of New Zealand

A Short History of New Zealand by Gordon McLauchlan

A new edition of the bestselling short history on New Zealand, updated to include the Helen Clark years, the rise of John Key, the Christchurch earthquakes and the 2011 Rugby World Cup!  A lively and accessible history written by one of New Zealand’s most well-known commentators on matters past and present. Succinct and well referenced, this book is the most accessible introduction to New Zealand history currently in print. 

6

The History of Australia and New Zealand from 1606 to 1890 - Alexander Sutherland Cover Art

The History of Australia and New Zealand from 1606 to 1890

The History of Australia and New Zealand from 1606 to 1890 by Alexander Sutherland

According to Wikipedia: "Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a country in the southern hemisphere comprising the mainland of the world's smallest continent, the major island of Tasmania, and numerous other islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.N4 Neighbouring countries include Indonesia, East Timor, and Papua New Guinea to the north, the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, and New Caledonia to the north-east, and New Zealand to the south-east. For around 40,000 years before European settlement commenced in the late 18th century, the Australian mainland and Tasmania were inhabited by around 250 individual nations of indigenous Australians.[8] After sporadic visits by fishermen from the immediate north, and European discovery by Dutch explorers in 1606,[9] the eastern half of Australia was claimed by the British in 1770 and initially settled through penal transportation to the colony of New South Wales, founded on 26 January 1788. The population grew steadily in the following years; the continent was explored, and during the 19th century another five largely self-governing Crown Colonies were established. On 1 January 1901, the six colonies became a federation, and the Commonwealth of Australia was formed. Since Federation, Australia has maintained a stable liberal democratic political system and remains a Commonwealth realm. The population is just over 21.3 million, with approximately 60% concentrated in and around the mainland state capitals of Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide. The nation's capital city is Canberra, located in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). Technologically advanced and industrialised, Australia is a prosperous nation and has good results in many international comparisons of national performance such as health care, life expectancy, quality-of-life, human development, public education, economic freedom, and the protection of civil liberties and political rights."

7

Australians - Thomas Keneally Cover Art

Australians

Australians Origins to Eureka by Thomas Keneally

In this volume of a unique history of Australia where people are always centre stage, bestselling author Thomas Keneally brings to life the vast range of characters who have formed our national story.Convicts and Aborigines, settlers and soldiers, patriots and reformers, bushrangers and gold seekers, it is from their lives and their stories that he has woven a vibrant history to do full justice to the rich and colourful nature of our unique national character.The story begins by looking at European occupation through Aboriginal eyes as we move between the city slums and rural hovels of eighteenth century Britain and the shores of Port Jackson. We spend time on the low-roofed convict decks of transports, and we see the bewilderment of the Eora people as they see the first ships of turaga, or 'ghost people'. We follow the daily round of Bennelong and his wife Barangaroo, and the tribulations of warrior Windradyne. Convicts like Solomon Wiseman and John Wilson find their feet and even fortune, while Henry Parkes' arrival as a penniless immigrant gives few clues to the national statesman he was to become. We follow the treks of the Chinese diggers - the Celestials - to the goldfields, and revolutionaries like Italian Raffaello Carboni and black American John Joseph bring us the drama of the Eureka uprising.Were the first European mothers whores or matriarchs? Was the first generation of Australian children the luckiest or unluckiest on the planet? How did this often cruel and brutal penal experiment lead to a coherent civil society? To answer these and many more questions Thomas Keneally has brought to life the high and the low, the convict and the free of early Australian society.This is truly a new history of Australia, by an author of outstanding literary skill and experience, and whose own humanity permeates every page.

8

A Short History of Australia - Ernest Scott Cover Art

A Short History of Australia

A Short History of Australia by Ernest Scott

Contents: CHAPTER I. THE DAWN OF DISCOVERY CHAPTER II. THE DUTCH AND NEW HOLLAND CHAPTER III. DAMPIER AND COOK CHAPTER IV. THE FOUNDATION OF SYDNEY CHAPTER V. THE CONVICT SYSTEM CHAPTER VI. GOVERNMENT AND GOVERNORS CHAPTER VII. FURTHER EXPLORATIONS CHAPTER VIII. THE EXTENSION OF SETTLEMENT CHAPTER IX. THE LAST OF THE TYRANTS CHAPTER X. THE DAWN OF CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENT CHAPTER XI. THE PROBLEM OF THE RIVERS CHAPTER XII. THE FOUNDING OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA CHAPTER XIII. SOUTH AUSTRALIA AND THE WAKEFIELD THEORY CHAPTER XIV. THE PORT PHILLIP DISTRICT CHAPTER XV. FROM VAN DIEMEN?S LAND TO TASMANIA CHAPTER XVI. THE LAND AND THE SQUATTERS CHAPTER XVII. THE END OF CONVICTISM CHAPTER XVIII. SELF-GOVERNMENT CHAPTER XIX. GOLD CHAPTER XX. THE HEART OF THE CONTINENT CHAPTER XXI. QUEENSLAND CHAPTER XXII. THE NORTHERN TERRITORY CHAPTER XXIII. DEMOCRACY AT WORK CHAPTER XXIV. DEMOCRACY AT WORK CHAPTER XXV. PAPUA AND THE PACIFIC CHAPTER XXVI. THE MOVEMENT TOWARDS FEDERATION CHAPTER XXVII. THE CONSTITUTION CHAPTER XXVIII. THE COMMONWEALTH (a) PARTIES AND PERSONALITIES CHAPTER XXIX. THE COMMONWEALTH (b) THE WHEELS OF POLICY CHAPTER XXX. AUSTRALIA IN THE GREAT WAR, 1914-1918 CHAPTER XXXI. FROM THE TREATY OF VERSAILLES TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR CHAPTER XXXII. IMPERIAL RELATIONS AND THE AUSTRALIAN SPIRIT

9

The Man Who Saved Smithy - Rick Searle Cover Art

The Man Who Saved Smithy

The Man Who Saved Smithy Fighter Pilot, Pioneer Aviator, Hero - the Extraordinary Life of Sir Gordon Taylor Mc, Gc by Rick Searle

Patrick Gordon 'Bill' Taylor was a pioneer of Australian aviation. As a fighter pilot during the First World War he won the MC. His wartime flying was the start of a life-long career during which he would use aircraft to pioneer air routes across several oceans. Returning to Australia after the war he became a close friend of Charles Ulm and Charles Kingsford Smith. Taylor and 'Smithy' went on to form an extraordinary flying partnership, making the first commercial mail flight to New Zealand, the first crossing of the Pacific in a single engine plane and many other records. It was on a trans Tasman flight in Smithy's famous Southern Cross that Taylor earned the Empire's highest award for civilian bravery, the George Cross. With one engine out of action with a broken propeller, and another fast running out of oil, Taylor repeatedly climbed out of the cockpit to transfer oil and keep the Southern Cross flying - all this just metres above the sea in a howling slipstream. After the deaths of Ulm and Kingsford Smith in separate accidents, Taylor became Australia's greatest surviving aviator. He went on to discover an alternative air route to Europe that avoided South East Asia - something that was to prove vital after the Fall of Singapore and Java in 1942. After yet another pioneering flight to Chile, he was knighted for his services to Australia and global aviation. Taylor died in 1966, and during his lifetime wrote eight books on various aspects of his life and on flying. Rick Searle has the permission of the Taylor family to use Taylor's published and unpublished material to further illustrate his thoroughly researched biography. The result is a compelling account of an Australian pioneering aviation hero who deserves to be recognised alongside his far more famous colleagues, Kingsford Smith and Ulm.

10

True Girt - David Hunt Cover Art

True Girt

True Girt The Unauthorised History of Australia, Volume 2 by David Hunt

First there was Girt . Now comes ... True Girt In this side-splitting sequel to his best-selling history, David Hunt transports us to the Australian frontier. This was the Wild South, home to hardy pioneers, gun-slinging bushrangers, directionally challenged explorers, nervous Indigenous people, Caroline Chisholm and sheep. Lots of sheep. True Girt introduces Thomas Davey, the hard-drinking Tasmanian governor who invented the Blow My Skull cocktail, and Captain Moonlite, Australia’s most notorious LGBTI bushranger. Meet William Nicholson, the Melbourne hipster who gave Australia the steam-powered coffee roaster and the world the secret ballot. And say hello to Harry, the first camel used in Australian exploration, who shot dead his owner, the adventurer John Horrocks. Learn how Truganini’s death inspired the Martian invasion of Earth. Discover the role of Hall and Oates in the Myall Creek Massacre. And be reminded why you should never ever smoke with the Wild Colonial Boy and Mad Dan Morgan. If Manning Clark and Bill Bryson were left on a desert island with only one pen, they would write True Girt. ‘An engaging, witty and utterly irreverent take on Australian history.’ Graeme Simsion, author of The Rosie Project ‘Astounding, gruesome and frequently hilarious, True Girt is riveting from beginning to end.’ Nick Earls David Hunt is an unusually tall and handsome man who likes writing his own biographical notes. His first book, Girt , won the 2014 Indie Award for non-fiction and was shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards and Australian Book Industry Awards. He has a birthmark that looks like Tasmania, only smaller and not as far south.

11

The Mutiny on the Bounty - Captain William Bligh Cover Art

The Mutiny on the Bounty

The Mutiny on the Bounty Texts by Captain Bligh, Sir John Farrow, and Rosalind Amelia Young by Captain William Bligh

The Mutiny of the Bounty is one of the most famous stories in maritime history that has been told in countless books and motion pictures. It describes the arduous voyage of the H.M.S. Bounty, under the harsh rule of the strict Captain Bligh, and the eventual mutiny of much of the crew led by the Mutineer Fletcher Christian. Less well-known is the incredible survival story of how Captain Bligh and fourteen loyal men were cast adrift in an tiny open boat, and how they survived an astonishing journey of 4,000 miles of the Southern Ocean, driven to extreme hardship. On his return to land, Captain Bligh sought justice against the mutineers, and several of them were captured, except for those who had sought to evade detection for ever by starting a new and tiny colony on the Island of Pitcairn - a speck of land in the vast Pacific Ocean. Here the mutineers, along with their descendants lived for many decades until the World finally caught up with them again, one of the strangest and most unique stories in World History. This book brings together 4 separated narratives, the first two being the personal accounts of Captain Bligh himself, detailing the original voyage of the Bounty, the Mutiny and the subsequent voyage across the South Sea. The third Text was written by Sir John Barrow, who, as Secretary t the Admiralty in Britain had a particular insight into the whole affair. The final text is a history of the vents on Pitcairn Island, by Rosalind Amelia Young, one of the native daughters of the Island, and a descendant of the original Mutineers of the Bounty.

12

Australian History in Seven Questions - John Hirst Cover Art

Australian History in Seven Questions

Australian History in Seven Questions by John Hirst

'If there are genuine questions about Australian history, there is something to puzzle over. The history ceases to be predictable— and dull.’ From the author of The Shortest History of Europe , acclaimed historian John Hirst, comes this fresh and stimulating approach to understanding Australia’s past and present. Hirst asks and answers questions that get to the heart of Australia’s history: • Why did Aborigines not take up farming? • How did a penal colony change peacefully into a democratic society? • Why was Australia so prosperous so early? • Why did the colonies federate? • What effect did convict origins have on national character? • Why was the postwar migration programme such a success? • Why is Australia not a republic? Engaging and enjoyable, and written for the novice and the expert alike, Australian History in Seven Questions explains how we became the nation we are today. “one of the nation’s most independent and original historians” – Geoffrey Blainey “John Hirst is the gadfly of Australian history, stinging and provocative” – Stuart Macintyre John Hirst was a member of the History Department at La Trobe University from 1968 to 2007. He has written many books on Australian history, including Convict Society and Its Enemies, The Strange Birth of Colonial Democracy, The Sentimental Nation, Sense and Nonsense in Australian History and The Shortest History of Europe.

13

The Colony - Grace Karskens Cover Art

The Colony

The Colony A History of Early Sydney by Grace Karskens

The Colony is the story of the marvellously contrary, endlessly energetic early years of Sydney. It is an intimate account of the transformation of a campsite in a beautiful cove to the town that later became Australia's largest and best-known city.From the sparkling beaches to the foothills of the Blue Mountains, Grace Karskens skilfully reveals how landscape shaped the lives of the original Aboriginal inhabitants and newcomers alike. She traces the ways in which relationships between the colonial authorities and ordinary men and women broke with old patterns, and the ways that settler and Aboriginal histories became entwined. She uncovers the ties between the burgeoning township and its rural hinterland expanding along the river systems of the Cumberland Plain.This is a landmark account of the birthplace of modern Australia, and a fascinating and richly textured narrative of people and place. 'This is a spellbinding saga of the beginnings of modern Australia. The Colony is a stunning achievement. It will change the way you feel about Australian history.' - Professor Tom Griffiths, Australian National University

14

The Friendly Islands: 1616 to 1900 - David Mulliss Cover Art

The Friendly Islands: 1616 to 1900

The Friendly Islands: 1616 to 1900 A collection of significant moments in the history of the Kingdom of Tonga by David Mulliss

The Friendly Islands: 1616 to 1900 is a fascinating 49,000 word book of the rich history of the Kingdom of Tonga over 300+ years. Prepare to be fascinated by the early observations of Europeans, and the struggle of the missionaries that influenced the nation two centuries ago.

15

Polynesian Navigation and the Discovery of New Zealand - Jeff Evans Cover Art

Polynesian Navigation and the Discovery of New Zealand

Polynesian Navigation and the Discovery of New Zealand by Jeff Evans

The Polynesian navigator Kupe is credited with the discovery of the land his expedition named Aotearoa, land of the long white cloud. How did he and the many canoes that followed find their way without modern navigational techniques through perilous seas in wooden canoes? By examining myth, star charts and contemporary Polynesian seafaring, Jeff Evans traces the methods by which the early explorers made their epic voyages in Part One. The book’s second part travels with Maori canoe expert Matahi Brightwell and navigator Frances Cowan aboard the traditional canoe Hawaiki-nui following traditional navigation – with no modern aids – on its historic voyage from Tahiti down to New Zealand.

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Australian Legendary Tales, folk-lore of the Noongahburrahs as told to the Piccaninnies - Mrs. K. Langloh Parker Cover Art

Australian Legendary Tales, folk-lore of the Noongahburrahs as told to the Piccaninnies

Australian Legendary Tales, folk-lore of the Noongahburrahs as told to the Piccaninnies by Mrs. K. Langloh Parker

According to Wikipedia: "Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a country in the southern hemisphere comprising the mainland of the world's smallest continent, the major island of Tasmania, and numerous other islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Neighbouring countries include Indonesia, East Timor, and Papua New Guinea to the north, the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, and New Caledonia to the north-east, and New Zealand to the south-east. For around 40,000 years before European settlement commenced in the late 18th century, the Australian mainland and Tasmania were inhabited by around 250 individual nations[7] of indigenous Australians.[8] After sporadic visits by fishermen from the immediate north, and European discovery by Dutch explorers in 1606,[9] the eastern half of Australia was claimed by the British in 1770 and initially settled through penal transportation to the colony of New South Wales, founded on 26 January 1788. The population grew steadily in the following years; the continent was explored, and during the 19th century another five largely self-governing Crown Colonies were established. On 1 January 1901, the six colonies became a federation, and the Commonwealth of Australia was formed. Since Federation, Australia has maintained a stable liberal democratic political system and remains a Commonwealth realm. The population is just over 21.3 million, with approximately 60% concentrated in and around the mainland state capitals of Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide. The nation's capital city is Canberra, located in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). Technologically advanced and industrialised, Australia is a prosperous nation and has good results in many international comparisons of national performance such as health care, life expectancy, quality-of-life, human development, public education, economic freedom, and the protection of civil liberties and political rights."

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"Over the Top" with the Third Australian Division, an account of WW I - G.P. Cuttriss Cover Art

"Over the Top" with the Third Australian Division, an account of WW I

"Over the Top" with the Third Australian Division, an account of WW I by G.P. Cuttriss

According to Wikipedia: "Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a country in the southern hemisphere comprising the mainland of the world's smallest continent, the major island of Tasmania, and numerous other islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.N4 Neighbouring countries include Indonesia, East Timor, and Papua New Guinea to the north, the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, and New Caledonia to the north-east, and New Zealand to the south-east. For around 40,000 years before European settlement commenced in the late 18th century, the Australian mainland and Tasmania were inhabited by around 250 individual nations of indigenous Australians.[8] After sporadic visits by fishermen from the immediate north, and European discovery by Dutch explorers in 1606,[9] the eastern half of Australia was claimed by the British in 1770 and initially settled through penal transportation to the colony of New South Wales, founded on 26 January 1788. The population grew steadily in the following years; the continent was explored, and during the 19th century another five largely self-governing Crown Colonies were established. On 1 January 1901, the six colonies became a federation, and the Commonwealth of Australia was formed. Since Federation, Australia has maintained a stable liberal democratic political system and remains a Commonwealth realm. The population is just over 21.3 million, with approximately 60% concentrated in and around the mainland state capitals of Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide. The nation's capital city is Canberra, located in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). Technologically advanced and industrialised, Australia is a prosperous nation and has good results in many international comparisons of national performance such as health care, life expectancy, quality-of-life, human development, public education, economic freedom, and the protection of civil liberties and political rights."

18

Contemporary Japan - Jeff Kingston Cover Art

Contemporary Japan

Contemporary Japan History, Politics, and Social Change since the 1980s by Jeff Kingston

The second edition of this comprehensive study of recent Japanese history now includes the author's expert assessment of the effects of the earthquake and tsunami, including the political and environmental consequences of the Fukushima reactor meltdown. Fully updated to include a detailed assessment of the aftermath of the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami Shows how the nuclear crisis at Fukushima was an accident waiting to happen Includes detailed discussion of Japan's energy policy, now in flux after the mishandling of the Fukushima crisis Analyzes Japan's 'Lost Decades', why jobs and families are less stable, environmental policies, immigration, the aging society, the US alliance, the imperial family, and the 'yakuza' criminal gangs Authoritative coverage of Japanese history over the last two decades, one of the country's most tumultuous periods

19

Guns,Germs, and Steel  Summary - Summary Station Cover Art

Guns,Germs, and Steel Summary

Guns,Germs, and Steel Summary by Summary Station

Learn About The History Of World Power In A Fraction Of The Time It Takes To Read The Actual Book!!! Diamond says that twenty-five years ago he met a politician in what is now Papua New Guinea, Yali, who asked why white people had so many things, but black people did not. The book attempts to provide answers to the question: Why have Eurasian people been the dominant wealth and power in the world? That is, why didn’t other cultures gain dominance before 1,500 CE? After all, until the end of the most recent Ice Age, circa 11,000 BCE, all humans were hunter-gatherers. So, what accounts for the different rates of development of societies between 11,000 BCE and 1500 CE? Those questions are the subject of the book. The author says that finding reasons or causes for the unequal distribution of wealth and goods does not justify it. Diamond says we do not justify disease just because we understand its causes. He says that the foundations of European societies were developed in other part of the world, so the focus is not on aggrandizing Europe. Here Is A Preview Of What You'll Learn When You Download Your Copy Today •How Geography Determines The Structure Of Societies •The Reason Why Europeans Were Able To Conquer Other Parts Of The World •Learn Why The Belief About European People Being A Superior Race Is Wrong

20

Great Tales from New Zealand History - Gordon McLauchlan Cover Art

Great Tales from New Zealand History

Great Tales from New Zealand History by Gordon McLauchlan

An intriguing collection of tales plucked from the byways of New Zealand’s history by a master storyteller who recognises a good yarn when he sees it. Gordon McLauchlan tempts our imagination with 46 little-known tales from the past. Here you will discover: - that Auckland applied twice to the Colonial Office to be a separate colony from the rest of New Zealand - more about the man who wanted to be James Cook - when drinking beer legally became an ‘art’ on the West Coast - whether Kupe was man or myth - how Hawera seceded and became a republic - when and why the Americans planned to invade New Zealand - which aviation heroine was called a ‘naughty girl who deserved a spanking’ - why a posse of politicians committed suicide . . . and more. This great collection of tales explores these and many more questions and issues which have fascinated New Zealanders and filled many a page in many a history book over the years. Gordon McLauchlan brings a fresh perspective on some old and often vexed periods in New Zealand’s history.

21

Polynesian Navigation and the Discovery of New Zealand - Jeff Evans Cover Art

Polynesian Navigation and the Discovery of New Zealand

Polynesian Navigation and the Discovery of New Zealand by Jeff Evans

The Polynesian navigator Kupe is credited with the discovery of New Zealand and his expedition named Aortearoa, land of the long white cloud. How did he and the many canoes that followed find their way without modern navigational techniques through preilous seas in wooden canoes? By examining myth, star charts and contemporary Polynesian seafaring, Jeff Evans traces the methods by which the early explorers made their epic voyages. The book's second part travels with Maori canoe expert Matahi Brightwell and navigator Frances Cowan aboard the traditional canoe Hawaiki-nui, following traditional navigation, with no modern aids, on its historic voyage from Tahiti to New Zealand.

22

A History of China - Morris Rossabi Cover Art

A History of China

A History of China by Morris Rossabi

Capturing China’s past in all its complexity, this multi-faceted history portrays China in the context of a larger global world, while incorporating the narratives of Chinese as well as non-Chinese ethnic groups and discussing people traditionally left out of the story—peasants, women, merchants, and artisans. Offers a complete political, economic, social, and cultural history of China, covering the major events and trends Written in a clear and uncomplicated style by a distinguished historian with over four decades of experience teaching undergraduates Examines Chinese history through the lens of global history to better understand how foreign influences affected domestic policies and practices Depicts the role of non-Chinese ethnic groups in China, such as Tibetans and Uyghurs, and analyzes the Mongol and Manchu rulers and their impact on Chinese society Incorporates the narratives of people traditionally left out of Chinese history, including women, peasants, merchants, and artisans

23

War in Afghanistan - Kevin Baker Cover Art

War in Afghanistan

War in Afghanistan A Short History of Eighty Wars and Conflicts in Afghanistan and the North-West Frontier 1839 to 2011 by Kevin Baker

There have been few books which put the conflicts into the broadest perspective, and even fewer that also include in their narrative descriptions of the numerous wars and conflicts on the Northwest Frontier as well as Afghanistan. This book includes information on all such wars in Afghanistan, not just those involving British armies, and also describes their background. For the past four years Kevin Baker has been Lecturer and now Visiting Fellow at the Australian Defence Force Academy (UNSW at ADFA).

24

Original Australians - Josephine Flood Cover Art

Original Australians

Original Australians Story Of The Aboriginal People by Josephine Flood

The Original Australians tells the story of Australian Aboriginal history and society from its distant beginnings to the present day. From the wisdom and paintings of the Dreamtime, to the first contacts between Europeans and indigenous Australians, right through to modern times, it offers an insight into the life and experiences of the world's oldest culture. The resilience and adaptability of Aboriginal people over millennia is one of the great human stories of all time.  Josephine Flood answers the questions about Aboriginal Australia that Australians and visitors often ask: Where did the Aborigines come from and when? How did they survive in such a harsh environment? What was the traditional role of Aboriginal women? Why didn't colonists sign treaties with Aboriginal people? Were Aboriginal children 'stolen'? Why are there so many problems in Aboriginal communities today? And many more.  This rich account aims to understand both black and white perspectives and is fascinating reading for anyone who wants to discover Aboriginal Australia.  'Another enthralling account by Josephine Flood, of Australian Aborigines! Her ensuring respect for her fellow humans underwrites every part of her exploration of the life and times of the Aboriginal people.' Pat O'Shane, Magistrate  This is an up-to-the-minute and balanced account of Aboriginal experience from earliest prehistory to today. Clearly written and well-illustrated, this is the best book to give someone who wants to know about Aborigines, their survival through the millennia, and the experiences they have to contribute to modern Australia.' Emeritus Professor Campbell Macknight, Australian National University

25

The South Pole (Illustrated) - Roald Amundsen Cover Art

The South Pole (Illustrated)

The South Pole (Illustrated) (Complete Volume I & II) by Roald Amundsen

Roald Amundsen records his race to be the first man to reach the South Pole. Amundsen's expertise enabled him to succeed where his predecessors, and competitors, did not. His rival Captain Robert F. Scott not only failed to reach the Pole first, but—due to poor preparation and miscalculation—died with the rest of his party on their return trip. The South Pole remains one of the greatest and most important books on polar exploration. Review - 'Roald Amundsen planted the Norwegian flag on the South Pole on December 14, 1911: a full month before Robert Falcon Scott arrived on the same spot. Amundsen's The South Pole (Hurst) is less well-known than his rivals, in part because he is less of a literary stylist, but also, perhaps, because he survived the journey. His book is a riveting first-hand account of a truly professional expedition; Amundsen's heroism is understated, but it is heroism nonetheless.' -Erica Wagner, The Times'Amundsen was the supreme exponent of Polar technique. He towered above his rivals; he brought an intellectual approach to exploration and stood, as he still stands, the antipole to the heroic delusion. [A...] The journey to the South Pole remains his masterpiece, the culmination of the classical age of Polar exploration and, perhaps, the greatest snow journey ever made.' -Roland Huntford, The Last Place on Earth: Scott and Amundsen's Race to the South Pole..

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Australians (Volume 2) - Thomas Keneally Cover Art

Australians (Volume 2)

Australians (Volume 2) Eureka to the Diggers by Thomas Keneally

In this companion volume of Thomas Keneally's widely acclaimed history of the Australian people, the vast range of characters who have formed our national story are brought vividly to life. Immigrants and Aboriginal resistance figures, bushrangers and pastoralists, working men and pioneering women, artists and hard-nosed radicals, politicians and soldiers all populate this richly drawn portrait of a vibrant land on the cusp of nationhood and social maturity.From the 1860s to the great rifts wrought by World War I, an era commenced in which Australian pursued glimmering visions: of equity in a promised land. It was a time of social experiment and reform, of industrial radicalism and women's rights. We were a society the world had much to learn from, or so we believed. But as much as we espoused we were a special people and celebrated a larrikin anti-authoritarianism, we retained provincial objectives that saw ultimate respect for society's structures. There was no Australian revolution.With a rich assortment of contradictory, inspiring and surprising characters, Tom Keneally brings to life the people of a young and cocky nation. This is truly a new history of Australia, by an author of outstanding literary skill and experience, and whose own humanity permeates every page.Praise for Australians:'No doubt about it, Australians is a corker.' - Cassandra Pybus, Weekend Australian'...the story of Australia and the Australians could be in no better hands than Keneally's.' - West Australian'Keneally evokes these distant lives with concrete detail and vivid sympathy...his people inhabit the same world we do - we meet them without the hesitation of reaching across voids of space and time. - Sydney Morning Herald'[Australians]will appeal to the general reader and the avid historian alike, and this is only the first volume. This reader can't wait for the second.' - Bookseller + Publisher

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Australia: A Very Short Introduction - Kenneth Morgan Cover Art

Australia: A Very Short Introduction

Australia: A Very Short Introduction by Kenneth Morgan

In this Very Short Introduction, Kenneth Morgan provides a wide-ranging and thematic introduction to modern Australia; examining the main features of its history, geography, and culture and drawing attention to the distinctive features of Australian life and its indigenous population and culture.

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The Stolen Island - Scott Hamilton Cover Art

The Stolen Island

The Stolen Island Searching for 'Ata by Scott Hamilton

‘What had happened to the stolen islanders? Had any survived slavery?’ One day in 1863 a strange ship stopped at ‘Ata, a tiny island in the wild seas between Tonga and New Zealand, and sailed away with one hundred and forty-four men, women and children. The ‘Atans were never heard from again, and in Tonga their fate became the subject of legends and superstitions. Uncovering the tragedy of ‘Ata takes Scott Hamilton on a journey to the kava circles and caves of Tonga and back to the streets of Auckland. The Stolen Island is a twenty-first century true sea story revealing slavers, mutinies, castaways, pirates and a cruel streak in Pacific history that is often overlooked but not forgotten.

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The Brave Ones - John Birmingham Cover Art

The Brave Ones

The Brave Ones East Timor, 1999 by John Birmingham

As the convoy growled and squeaked to a halt in the dark, angry militiamen and soldiers began to shout and wave at the Australians, demanding they move aside. The Brave Ones' vanguard presented as a B-movie vision of some pirate biker gang from Hell, a rat bastard outfit in black tee-shirts, camouflage pants, long hair and bandanas, with axes in their eyes and guns at the ready. The Brave Ones follows the Indonesian Army's Battalion 745 as it withdrew from East Timor after the 1999 independence vote, leaving a trail of devastation in its wake. Birmingham's unflinching account reveals the scorched-earth tactics of the retreating troops, and shows just how close Australia came to armed conflict with Indonesia. Short Blacks are gems of recent Australian writing – brisk reads that quicken the pulse and stimulate the mind . John Birmingham is the author of He Died with a Felafel in His Hand, Leviathan: The Unauthorised Biography of Sydney , three popular fiction series and two Quarterly Essays.

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Daughters of Erebus - Paul Holmes Cover Art

Daughters of Erebus

Daughters of Erebus by Paul Holmes

How 287 people died in the air crash on Mt Erebus. What caused the crash and who covered it up

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Where the White Man Treads - Across the Pathway of the Maori - W. Otorohanga Cover Art

Where the White Man Treads - Across the Pathway of the Maori

Where the White Man Treads - Across the Pathway of the Maori by W. Otorohanga

Originally published in 1928, this book is a comprehensive study of the Maori people and their inner lives, customs and beliefs, written by one who lived amongst them during a time before modern western civilisation had much altered their existence. This book is a fascinating read, and is highly recommended for inclusion on the bookshelf of anyone with an interest in other cultures and societies. Many of these earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

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Island Nation - Frank Broeze Cover Art

Island Nation

Island Nation A History of Australians and The Sea by Frank Broeze

The story of the Australian people is a story of the interaction of land, cities and the sea. Land and cities have received ample attention but the role of the sea as an integral part of our national experience has remained largely unexplored. Island Nation sets out to restore the sea to its rightful place in Australia's history. It offers an alternative account of the past and opens new windows on the forces that have shaped our present. Island Nation traces the profound, diverse and all-embracing influence of the sea on Australian society - an influence that extends far beyond the coastline. In this story of the interaction of people and the sea, three major issues emerge: controlling sea space, taming distance, and living with the sea. In exploring these issues in all their diversity, Island Nation ranges widely, encompassing the birth of an Australian 'Monroe Doctrine', the development of unique economic and political institutions, the role of surfing and the growth of tourism, the impact of the sea on Australian art, 'ships of shame' and very much else besides. 'In this deftly innovative survey, Frank Broeze draws the reader's attention away from the landmass to the oceans that surround it, and then back to the shoreline, ports and beaches. There have been previous studies of Australians and the sea, but this is our first fully amphibious account.' - Professor Stuart Macintyre

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Australians - Thomas Keneally Cover Art

Australians

Australians A Short History by Thomas Keneally

Australians , Thomas Keneally's widely acclaimed three volume history of the Australian people from origins to Vietnam, gave us a robust, vibrant and page-turning narrative that brought to life the vast range of characters who have formed our national story. Australians: a short history brings these three volumes together and reintroduces us to the rich assortment of contradictory, inspiring and surprising characters who made a young and cocky Australia. It is the story of the original Australians and European occupation of their land through the convict era to pastoralists, bushrangers and gold seekers, working men, pioneering women, the rifts wrought by World War I, the rise of hard-nosed radicals from the Left and the Right, the social upheavals of the Great Crash and World War II, the Menzies era, the nation changing period of post-war migration and Australia's engagement with Asia. This is a truly masterly history of Australia and its people by an author of outstanding literary skill whose own humanity permeates every page. Praise for Australians , the three volume history '... giving us what Australian history has desperately needed for years.' Canberra Times 'Keneally evokes these distant lives with concrete detail and vivid sympathy ... his people inhabit the same world we do - we meet them without the hesitation of reaching across voids of space and time.' Sydney Morning Herald 'When it comes to writing page-turning narrative no one does it better than Thomas Keneally ... no doubt about it, Australians is a corker.' Weekend Australian 'Reading this book is like listening to a witty raconteur.' Adelaide Advertiser 'This new perspective on Australia's founding fathers is truly fascinating.' Courier Mail '... what this book does is populate the blankness of our collective memory with lots of characters from all parts of the continent and all walks of life.' Saturday Age

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Last of the Nomads - W J Peaseley Cover Art

Last of the Nomads

Last of the Nomads by W J Peaseley

'Peasley's description of the events … is informative, compassionate, exciting and at times deeply moving.' —Don Grant, Australian Book Review 'The intriguing story of [the rescue of an elderly couple believed to be the last Australian nomads] and how they survived alone for the previous 30 years or so in the unrelenting western Gibson Desert region of WA, is fascinating reading.' — Chris Walters, The West Australian 'This is a most remarkable book about the recovery during the 1977 drought of an ailing Aboriginal nomadic couple, living in desert regions of Western Australia.' — The National Times Warri and Yatungka were believed to be the last of the Mandildjara tribe of desert nomads to live permanently in the traditional way. Their deaths in the late 1970s marked the end of a tribal lifestyle that stretched back more than 30,000 years. The Last of the Nomads tells of an extraordinary journey in search of Warri and Yatungka.

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A New Life in our History: the settlement of Australia and New Zealand: volume I The Fatal Shore ? (1780s to 1830s) - Justin Cahill Cover Art

A New Life in our History: the settlement of Australia and New Zealand: volume I The Fatal Shore ? (1780s to 1830s) by Justin Cahill

A New Life in our History offers a fresh view of Australian and New Zealand history. It tells, for the first time, the epic story of their settlement from the perspective of ordinary people. Beginning with the arrest of Solomon Bockerah and his transportation to Sydney on the notorious Second Fleet, it follows the spectacular rise and fall of the emancipist Sydney merchant John Laurie, the arrival of the Lang family on the ‘First Four Ships’ to Canterbury, the Nicholson family’s survival of the infamous Highland Clearances and the establishment of the Croydon Bush village settlement in rural Southland. It also tells how their descendants answered the call of King and Country, following the men who served at Gallipoli and along the Western Front during World War I and those who served during the Battle of Britain and Italian campaign during World War II. Over twenty years in the making, A New Life in our History is an unprecedented attempt to show how ordinary people make history happen.

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A Very Rude Awakening - Peter Grose Cover Art

A Very Rude Awakening

A Very Rude Awakening The Night The Japanese Midget Subs Came To Sydney Harbour by Peter Grose

On the night of 31 May 1942, Sydney was doing what it does best: partying. The theatres, restaurants, dance halls, illegal gambling dens, clubs and brothels offered plenty of choice to roistering sailors, soldiers and airmen on leave in Australia's most glamorous city. The war seemed far away. Newspapers devoted more pages to horse racing than to Hitler. That Sunday night the party came to a shattering halt when three Japanese midget submarines crept into the harbour, past eight electronic indicator loops, past six patrolling Royal Australian Navy ships, and past an anti-submarine net stretched across the inner harbour entrance. Their arrival triggered a night of mayhem, courage, chaos and high farce which left 27 sailors dead and a city bewildered. The war, it seemed, was no longer confined to distant desert and jungle. It was right here at Australia's front door. Written at the pace of a thriller and based on new first person accounts and previously unpublished official documents, A Very Rude Awakening is a ground-breaking and myth-busting look at one of the most extraordinary stories ever told of Australia at war.

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Australia s Convict Past - Robert Coupe Cover Art

Australia s Convict Past

Australia s Convict Past by Robert Coupe

On 26 January 1788, a fleet of eleven ships sailed into Port Jackson. Among the 1,500 people on board were about 750 British and Irish convicts - men and women who were being punished for their crimes by being sent as far away from their homes as it was possible to go. Australia s Convict Past charts the development of the convict era, from its beginnings in the British Parliament, which was desperate to relieve its over crowded jails, through the establishment of settlements and penal colonies to the arrival of the last convict ship 80 years after the first settlement.

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True Stories of Early Australia - Richard G Tomkies Cover Art

True Stories of Early Australia

True Stories of Early Australia by Richard G Tomkies

This new book "True Stories of Early Australia" is the result of a great deal of research and is complete with old photographs both black and white and color. The author has endeavored to record some fascinating stories of an earlier era many of which have been obscured over time from the general reading public. The stories cover the period from the late 19th Century to the mid-20th. Read the tale of how two intrepid New Zealanders in 1928 braved the hitherto unexplored regions of Cape York Peninsula by driving the first car right to the very most northern tip of Queensland, braving crocodile infested rivers and treacherous sandy crossings. They drove a small seven h.p. "Baby" Austin Seven from Sydney and won a bet doing it! Many stories tell of hardships endured by white settlers who had to contend with cannibalistic Aborigines. However, some sailors like James Morrill survived a shipwreck and were "adopted into an Aboriginal tribe for many years. Others were not quite so lucky and ended up on the natives' menu. The result of much research into a bygone era this book is packed with fascinating stories which have hitherto been lost to time but now complete with old black and white and color photos it brings to life strange and unusual happenings of the period from the late 19th Century to the mid-20th. This book is a “must-read" for those who love well-researched historical non-fiction of early Australia.

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The Conspiracy of Silence - Timothy Bottoms Cover Art

The Conspiracy of Silence

The Conspiracy of Silence Queensland's Frontier Killing Times by Timothy Bottoms

'This is an important, well researched book: challenging, compelling and controversial. It is a must read for anyone interested in Australian history.' - Henry Reynolds The Queensland frontier was more violent than any other Australian colony. From the first penal settlement at Moreton Bay in 1824, as white pastoralists moved into new parts of country, violence invariably followed. Many tens of thousands of Aboriginals were killed on the Queensland frontier. Europeans were killed too, but in much smaller numbers. The cover-up began from the start: the authorities in Sydney and Brisbane didn't want to know, the Native Police did their deadly work without hindrance, and the pastoralists had every reason to keep it to themselves. Even today, what we know about the killing times is swept aside again and again in favour of the pioneer myth. Conspiracy of Silence is the first systematic account of frontier violence in Queensland. Following in the tracks of the pastoralists as they moved into new lands across the state in the nineteenth century, Timothy Bottoms identifies massacres, poisonings and other incidents, including many that no-one has documented in print before. He explores the colonial mindset and explains how the brutal dispossession of Aboriginal landowners continued over decades. '... a road-map back into what seems, from a modern perspective, to be a barely conceivable past.' - From the foreword by Raymond Evans

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Shooters, Trappers & Poisoners - MIchael Bogle Cover Art

Shooters, Trappers & Poisoners

Shooters, Trappers & Poisoners by MIchael Bogle

Shooters, Trappers & Poisoners explores the rapidly receding world of Australian doggers and rabbiters as they wage war on two of Australia’s most familiar feral animals, the dingo, its mixed-breed descendants and the feral rabbit. Beginning in the 19th century and continuing to the present, two paths emerge: one is the lucrative industry of selling animal pelts and carcasses (including the harvesting of koala and Tasmanian tiger skins); while the other is the practical requirements for eliminating wild dogs and rabbits. Rabbiters and doggers are notorious for their unique and secretive tradecraft, such as the preparation of odiferous dog baits, the use of firearms, the setting of traps and the deployment of arcane poisons and gases. The book also explores the phenomenon of the Australian outlaw animal, the impact of germ warfare on rabbiting and the isolation of the outback. To frame this lively survey, Shooters, Trappers & Poisoners draws on oral histories, bush folklore, memoirs, scientific studies, contemporary newspaper accounts and 37 rarely seen photographs and illustrations.

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Orphans of the Living - Joanna Penglase Cover Art

Orphans of the Living

Orphans of the Living by Joanna Penglase

Drawing on interviews, submissions to the Senate Inquiry, and personal experience, this revealing documentation describes, for the first time, the experience of Forgotten Australians from the perspective of the survivors. In August 2004, Parliamentary senators wept as they presented the report from the Senate Inquiry into the treatment of children in care. Half a million children grew up in “care” in 20th-century Australia, and most often these children lived with daily brutal physical and emotional abuse in the sterile environment of an institution. Unraveling with tenderness, compassion, and intellect the seemingly explicable accounts as to how and why this occurred this study reveals the profound personal costs to the children involved—and the huge social and economic ramifications of past policies.

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Australians (volume 3) - Thomas Keneally Cover Art

Australians (volume 3)

Australians (volume 3) Flappers to Vietnam by Thomas Keneally

Australia emerged from WW1 into a decade of profound change, characterised by a revolution in behaviour amongst the young; by the first great age of consumerism; by the new and increasingly sophisticated impact of the movies; by secret right wing armies and the emergence of the Communist Party; and by two less remembered and very interesting PMs, the handsome, sombre Stanley Melbourne Bruce of the Melbourne Establishment, and Jim Scullin, unpretentious Labor man of humbler Irish parentage. As in the two previous volumes of Australians Keneally brings history to vivid and pulsating life as he traces the lives and the deeds of Australians known and unknown. As another war grew closer he follows the famous and the infamous through the Great Crash and the rise of Fascism, and explains how Australia was inexorably drawn into a war which led her forces into combat throughout Asia, Africa, Europe and the Pacific. At home an atmosphere of fear grew with the fall of Singapore and the bombing of Darwin, the Japanese advance and then the American Alliance and the arrival of General MacArthur Peace brought its own problems with the Depression that left one third of Australians unemployed. Keneally believes too that the 1950s are misunderstood - depicted by some as an age of full employment, by others as the age of suburban spread and boredom under the serene prime ministership of Robert Menzies. But Menzies was complicated and so were the 1950s. A majority of Australians believed there would be nuclear war before the end of the decade. The Korean war was seen as prelude, and so our government agreed to British atom bomb tests in the South Australian desert and at the Montebello islands. The fall of the French in Vietnam was prelude to our engagement there and, along with the defection of the Soviet spy Petrov, convinced Australians they were living in the last of days. Under this pressure the talented leader of the ALP, Bert Evatt, one of the founders of the UN, saw his party begin to split in two. On the street, the face of Australia, in an era of great change, was undergoing an Italian, Greek and Slavic-led sea change. And in even greater changes, Asian trade and immigration, were coming our way, especially now that we had signed the peace treaty with Japan. The result of masterly writing and exhaustive research is a volume which brings Australia's more recent history to vibrant life.

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Maralinga - Frank Walker Cover Art

Maralinga

Maralinga The chilling expose of our secret nuclear shame and betrayal of our troops and country by Frank Walker

'The story reaches out and grabs you by the throat' - Dr Clare Wright, historian and author of The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka The facts are shocking. The treachery is chilling. The fallout ongoing. This edition contains a new author note with shocking new material that has come to light as a result of the groundbreaking original publication. Investigative journalist Frank Walker's Maralinga is a must-read true story of the abuse of our servicemen, scientists treating the Australian population as lab rats and politicians sacrificing their own people in the pursuit of power. During the Menzies era, with the blessing of the Prime Minister, the British government exploded twelve atomic bombs on Australian soil. RAAF pilots were ordered to fly into nuclear mushroom clouds, soldiers told to walk into radioactive ground zero, sailors retrieved highly contaminated debris - none of them aware of the dangers they faced. But the betrayal didn't end with these servicemen. Secret monitoring stations were set up around the country to measure radiation levels and a clandestine decades-long project stole bones from dead babies to see how much fallout had contaminated their bodies - their grieving parents were never told. This chilling exposé drawn from extensive research and interviews with surviving veterans reveals the betrayal of our troops and our country. 'An amazing tale ? utterly gripping, it reads like a thriller' - Jon Faine, ABC Radio Melbourne 'This book will contribute to a much greater awareness and perhaps much more action on this issue' - Fran Kelly, ABC Radio National 'Walker demonstrates powerfully why, regardless of the context in which the testing took place, the emotional legacy of Maralinga will linger in the Australian psyche, just as do Gallipoli, Bodyline and Singapore. The cost in terms of damage to health, the environment and public trust in government will remain with us for generations to come' - The Australian 'Shocking revelations?' - Margaret Throsby, Midday Interview, ABC Classic FM 'An extraordinary story ? there are things here that would make your hair stand on end' - Philip Clark, ABC Radio Canberra 'This book should be on the school syllabus' - Andrew O'Keefe, Weekend Sunrise

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Australia, its History and Present Condition Containing an Account both of the Bush and of the Colonies with their Respective Inhabitants - William Pridden Cover Art

Australia, its History and Present Condition Containing an Account both of the Bush and of the Colonies with their Respective Inhabitants by William Pridden

A few words by way of Preface are requisite, in order that the objects of the present Work may be stated to the reader, and that he may also be made acquainted with the sources whence the information here communicated is derived, and from consulting which he may still further inform himself concerning Australia. The aim of the writer of the following pages has been,—while furnishing a description of some of the most flourishing and interesting settlements belonging to the British Crown, which, at the same time, exhibit in contrast to each other the two extremes of savage and civilised life;—to call the attention of his countrymen, both at home and in the colonies, to the evils which have arisen from the absence of moral restraint and religious instruction in colonies of civilised and (nominally) christian men. And although it must in many ways be a disadvantage that the person professing to describe a particular country should have gained all his knowledge of it from the report of others, without ever having himself set foot upon its shores; yet, in one respect at least, this may operate advantageously. He is less likely to have party prejudices or private interests to serve in his account of the land to which he is a total stranger. In consequence, probably, of his being an indifferent and impartial observer, not one of our Australian colonies wears in his eye the appearance of a perfect paradise; but then, on the other hand, there is not one of those fine settlements which prejudice urges him to condemn, as though it were barren and dreary as the Great Sahara itself. And the same circumstance—his never having breathed the close unwholesome air of colonial party-politics—will render it less likely that his judgment respecting persons and disputed opinions should be unduly biassed. There will be more probability of his judging upon right principles, and although his facts may (in some instances, unavoidably) be less minutely accurate than an inhabitant of the country would have given, yet they may be less coloured and less partially stated. Instead of giving his own observations as an eye-witness, fraught with his own particular views, he can calmly weigh the opposite statements of men of different opinions, and between the two he is more likely to arrive at the truth. With regard to the present Work, however impartial the author has endeavoured to be, however free he may be from colonial passions and interests, he does not wish to deceive the reader by professing a total freedom from all prejudice. If this were desirable, it is impossible; it is a qualification which no writer, or reader either, possesses. But thus much may be stated, that all his prejudices are in favour of those institutions with which it has pleased God to bless his native land. In a volume that is intended to form part of a series called “The Englishman’s Library,” it may be permitted, surely, to acknowledge a strong and influencing attachment to the Sovereign, the Church, and the Constitution of England.

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The Gallipoli Letter - Keith Murdoch Cover Art

The Gallipoli Letter

The Gallipoli Letter by Keith Murdoch

In September 1915, Keith Murdoch, then a young war journalist, wrote an 8000-word letter to the Prime Minister, Andrew Fisher. 'The Gallipoli Letter', as it came to be known, changed the course of the Gallipoli campaign. The letter, protesting against the conduct of the campaign and describing conditions at the front, is both intimate and conversational: 'I shall talk to you as if you were by my side.' It is also at times angry, passionate, vivid and very moving: 'Then in the early hours came the landing, when the life of man is at its lowest.' At times, it is simply heartbreaking: 'The heroic Fourth Brigade was reduced in three day's fighting to little more than 1000 strong. You will be glad to know that the men died well.' The letter changed the course of the campaign: Hamilton, the general in charge of the campaign, was sent home, and the Allies were withdrawn in December of the same year.The Gallipoli Letter is an inspiring document. It speaks directly to us about war, our history and the indomitable Australian spirit. Accessible and compelling, it should be read by everyone - it is a vital part of our history and the enduring ANZAC legend.

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Bateman Illustrated History of New Zealand - Matthew Wright Cover Art

Bateman Illustrated History of New Zealand

Bateman Illustrated History of New Zealand by Matthew Wright

New Zealand's past has been a rollercoaster ride of hopes, dreams, wars and peace. In his fully revised Illustrated History, noted historian Matthew Wright brings New Zealand's turbulent, exciting past to life, tracing our journey from the arrival of Polynesians over 800 years ago, to the present day. Nearly 600 paintings, maps, sketches and photographs from the collection of the Alexander Turnbull Library highlight New Zealand's journey from past into present.

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Ghost Platoon - Frank Walker Cover Art

Ghost Platoon

Ghost Platoon by Frank Walker

'thoroughly researched and compelling . . . a chilling account' - The Sun Herald An eye-opening account of Australian combat history, untold . . . until now. In 1969 a ragtag unit of 39 men were thrown together at Nui Dat, Vietnam. It was so slapdash a group it didn't even have an officer or sergeant in charge. A rugged ex-Royal Marine stepped forward to take the lead. Jim Riddle was only an acting corporal but he knew enough of war to keep these young diggers alive. When the platoon was involved in a high-risk ambush Riddle proved his leadership skills, bringing his men through unscathed and leaving the battlefield littered with enemy bodies. Despite their success, immediately afterwards the platoon was disbanded. According to the army they'd never existed ? theirs was a ghost platoon. Frank Walker details what happened at that ambush and why the army buried their existence, and the secrets that went with it. His findings are a shocking indictment of the long-term effects of war. The men of the platoon ? who'd fought so hard for their country ? had to fight again to reveal the truth. But the price they all paid was far too high. Ghost Platoon is a gripping story of the soldiers who should never be forgotten . . . or denied.

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Best Australian Yarns - Jim Haynes Cover Art

Best Australian Yarns

Best Australian Yarns And Other True Stories by Jim Haynes

Best Australian Yarns is a substantial and definitive collection of factual and fanciful Aussie stories, humour and anecdotes--the result of decades of researching popular Aussie culture and history and yarning to mates and other colourful characters from all parts of Australia and all walks of life. This collection includes tall stories from the bush, reminiscences from the racetrack and shearing shed, railway yarns, stories from the world of show business, Aboriginal legends and humour, digger yarns from both world wars, ghost stories, monsters, bunyips and yowies... and many things you never knew about our amazing history and the characters who made it--the pioneers, heroes, convicts, bushrangers, eccentrics and brave and forgotten men and women whose fascinating lives and achievements created the Aussie spirit that we all love. While the stories range from poignant to hilarious, many simply describe unusual coincidences, strange occurrences or simple everyday humorous events with a refreshing understatement that vividly evokes a vanishing Australia where looking for a good laugh was a key component of a cheekier national character and a simpler lifestyle.

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Kokoda Trail for Dummies - Peter Williams Cover Art

Kokoda Trail for Dummies

Kokoda Trail for Dummies by Peter Williams

Everything you need to know about the Kokoda Trail and its place in Australian history Interest in the Kokoda Trail is growing rapidly among many Australians, both for its attraction as a hiking destination and for its historical significance. Kokoda For Dummies offers a fast track tool for learning everything you need to know about this unique thoroughfare, in one concise volume. Part history book, part practical guide, Kokoda For Dummies is perfect both for those considering following our Diggers’ footsteps along ‘the track’ or armchair travellers who want to learn about its history. Covering the full history of the Kokoda Trail, from its beginnings as an overland mail route to the fierce battles between the Australians and the Japanese that took place along its length during World War II, the book also includes important information on walking the trail yourself. From the steps you need to take to get ready to what to bring, Kokoda For Dummies is the definitive resource for anyone looking for a comprehensive overview of this significant landmark. Focuses on walking the track as a pilgrimage and a history lesson for history buffs and hiking enthusiasts alike Covers the health and safety concerns involved with walking the track, including a basic Kokoda itinerary Contains eyewitness accounts of the Kokoda battles gleaned from interviews conducted with Australian and Japanese war veterans A comprehensive but accessible history of the Kokoda Trail and its significance to Australia, in one volume.

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The Way it Was - Peter Forrestal Cover Art

The Way it Was

The Way it Was A history of the early days of the Margaret River wine industry by Peter Forrestal

The Margaret River region of Australia’s south-west is internationally renowned for its award-winning wines.  There are now more than 200 wineries, predominantly boutique style, in the region, producing more than 20% of Australia’s premium wine market. The Way It Was  tells the story of the  early days of the region’s wine industry, from the first plantings by Dr Tom Cullity in 1967 through an informative text and many illustrations.

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