Top European History Ebooks

Jump to ebook: #10 #20 #30 #40 #50

1

Foundation - Peter Ackroyd Cover Art

Foundation

Foundation The History of England from Its Earliest Beginnings to the Tudors by Peter Ackroyd

The first book in Peter Ackroyd's history of England series, which has since been followed up with two more installments, Tudors and Rebellion . In Foundation, the chronicler of London and of its river, the Thames, takes us from the primeval forests of England's prehistory to the death, in 1509, of the first Tudor king, Henry VII. He guides us from the building of Stonehenge to the founding of the two great glories of medieval England: common law and the cathedrals. He shows us glimpses of the country's most distant past--a Neolithic stirrup found in a grave, a Roman fort, a Saxon tomb, a medieval manor house--and describes in rich prose the successive waves of invaders who made England English, despite being themselves Roman, Viking, Saxon, or Norman French. With his extraordinary skill for evoking time and place and his acute eye for the telling detail, Ackroyd recounts the story of warring kings, of civil strife, and foreign wars. But he also gives us a vivid sense of how England's early people lived: the homes they built, the clothes the wore, the food they ate, even the jokes they told. All are brought vividly to life in this history of England through the narrative mastery of one of Britain's finest writers.

2

Great Contemporaries - Winston S. Churchill Cover Art

Great Contemporaries

Great Contemporaries Essays and Other Works by Winston S. Churchill

Insightful biographical sketches of major historical figures of the twentieth century, from the incomparable British statesman.   Winston Churchill was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature on the strength of “his mastery of historical and biographical description.” Nowhere is that mastery more evident than in Great Contemporaries —which features Churchill’s profiles of many of the major figures of his time.   These short biographies cover political and cultural personalities ranging from Franklin Roosevelt, Adolf Hitler, Lawrence of Arabia, and Leon Trotsky to Charlie Chaplin, H. G. Wells, Rudyard Kipling, and George Bernard Shaw. This edition includes five previously uncollected essays and a number of photographs, plus an enlightening introduction and annotations by noted Churchill scholar James W. Muller.   Written in the decade before Churchill became prime minister, these essays focus on the challenges of statecraft at a time when the democratic revolution was toppling older regimes based on tradition and aristocratic privilege. Churchill’s keen observations take on new importance in our own age of roiling political change. Ultimately, Great Contemporaries provides fascinating insight into these subjects as Churchill approaches them with a measuring eye, finding their limitations at least as revealing as their merits.

3

Dante Encyclopedia - Richard Lansing Cover Art

Dante Encyclopedia

Dante Encyclopedia by Richard Lansing

The Dante Encyclopedia is a comprehensive resource that presents a systematic introduction to Dante's life and works and the cultural context in which his moral and intellectual imagination took shape.

4

A Distant Mirror - Barbara W. Tuchman Cover Art

A Distant Mirror

A Distant Mirror The Calamitous 14th Century by Barbara W. Tuchman

Barbara W. Tuchman—the acclaimed author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning classic The Guns of August —once again marshals her gift for character, history, and sparkling prose to compose an astonishing portrait of medieval Europe.   The fourteenth century reflects two contradictory images: on the one hand, a glittering age of crusades, cathedrals, and chivalry; on the other, a world plunged into chaos and spiritual agony. In this revelatory work, Barbara W. Tuchman examines not only the great rhythms of history but the grain and texture of domestic life: what childhood was like; what marriage meant; how money, taxes, and war dominated the lives of serf, noble, and clergy alike. Granting her subjects their loyalties, treacheries, and guilty passions, Tuchman re-creates the lives of proud cardinals, university scholars, grocers and clerks, saints and mystics, lawyers and mercenaries, and, dominating all, the knight—in all his valor and “furious follies,” a “terrible worm in an iron cocoon.”   Praise for A Distant Mirror   “Beautifully written, careful and thorough in its scholarship . . . What Ms. Tuchman does superbly is to tell how it was. . . . No one has ever done this better.” — The New York Review of Books   “A beautiful, extraordinary book . . . Tuchman at the top of her powers . . . She has done nothing finer.” — The Wall Street Journal   “Wise, witty, and wonderful . . . a great book, in a great historical tradition.” —Commentary NOTE: This edition does not include color images.

5

The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich - William Shirer Cover Art

The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich

The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by William Shirer

When the Third Reich fell, it fell swiftly. The Nazis had little time to cover up their memos, their letters, or their diaries. William L. Shirer’s definitive book on the Third Reich uses these unique sources. Combined with his personal experience with the Nazis, living through the war as an international correspondent, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich not only earned Shirer a National Book Award but is recognized as one of the most important and authoritative books about the Third Reich and Nazi Germany ever written. The diaries of propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels as well as evidence and other testimony gained at the Nuremberg Trials could not have found more artful hands. Shirer gives a clear, detailed and well-documented account of how it was that Adolf Hitler almost succeeded in conquering the world. With millions of copies in print, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich has become one of the most authoritative books on one of mankind’s darkest hours. Shirer focuses on 1933 to 1945 in clear detail. Here is a worldwide bestseller that also tells the true story of the Holocaust, often in the words of the men who helped plan and conduct it. It is a classic by any measure. The book has been translated into twelve languages and was adapted as a television miniseries, broadcast by ABC in 1968. This first ever e-book edition is published on the 50th anniversary of this iconic work.

6

The Story of Moors in Spain - Stanley Lane-Poole Cover Art

The Story of Moors in Spain

The Story of Moors in Spain by Stanley Lane-Poole

This eBook has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. In 711 the Islamic Moors of Arab and Berber descent in North Africa crossed the Strait of Gibraltar onto the Iberian Peninsula, and in a series of raids they conquered Visigothic Christian Hispania and founded the first Muslim countries in Europe. Contents: The Last of the Goths The Wave of Conquest The People of Andalusia A Young Pretender The Christian Martyrs The Great Khalif The Holy War The City of the Khalif The Prime Minister The Berbers in Power My Cid the Challenger The Kingdom of Granada The Fall of Granada Bearing the Cross

7

Balkan Ghosts - Robert D. Kaplan Cover Art

Balkan Ghosts

Balkan Ghosts A Journey Through History by Robert D. Kaplan

From the assassination that triggered World War I to the ethnic warfare in Serbia, Bosnia, and Croatia, the Balkans have been the crucible of the twentieth century, the place where terrorism and genocide first became tools of policy. Chosen as one of the Best Books of the Year by The New York Times , and greeted with critical acclaim as "the most insightful and timely work on the Balkans to date" ( The Boston Globe ), Kaplan's prescient, enthralling, and often chilling political travelogue is already a modern classic. This new edition of Balkan Ghosts includes six opinion pieces written by Robert Kaplan about the Balkans between 1996 and 2000 beginning just after the implementation of the Dayton Peace Accords and ending after the conclusion of the Kosovo war, with the removal of Slobodan Milosevic from power.

8

Saxons vs. Vikings - Ed West Cover Art

Saxons vs. Vikings

Saxons vs. Vikings Alfred the Great and England in the Dark Ages by Ed West

A witty and concise look at the beginnings of English history, when the nation consolidated after clashes between the Saxons and invading Vikings. In 871, three of England's four kingdoms were overrun by Vikings, the ruthless, all-conquering Scandinavian raiders who terrorized early medieval Europe. With the Norsemen murdering one king with arrows and torturing another to death by ripping out his lungs, the prospects that faced the kingdom of Wessex were bleak. Worse still, the Saxons were now led by a young man barely out of his teens who was more interested in God than fighting. Yet within a decade Alfred—the only English king known as the Great—had driven the Vikings out of half of England, and his children and grandchildren would unite the country a few years later. This period, popular with fans of television shows such as Vikings and The Last Kingdom, saw the creation of England as a nation-state, with Alfred laying down the first national law code, establishing an education system and building cities. Saxons vs. Vikings also covers the period before Alfred, including ancient Britain, the Roman occupation, and the Dark Ages, explaining important historical episodes such as Boudicca, King Arthur, and Beowulf. Perfect for newcomers to the subject, this is the second title in the new A Very, Very Short History of England series. If you’re trying to understand England and its history in the most informative and entertaining way possible, this is the place to start.

9

Georgia in Perspective: Orientation Guide and Cultural Orientation - David N. Spires Cover Art

Georgia in Perspective: Orientation Guide and Cultural Orientation

Georgia in Perspective: Orientation Guide and Cultural Orientation Geography, History, Economy, Religion, Customs, Urban and Rural Life, Black Sea, Sakartvelo, Caucasus, T'bilisi, Supra, Stalin by David N. Spires

This unique guide produced by the Department of Defense provides comprehensive information about all aspects of life in Georgia, with a special emphasis on geography, history, the economy, society, security and military matters, religion, traditions, urban and rural life, ethnic groups, crime, the environment, government, holidays, gender issues and much more. CHAPTER 1: GEOGRAPHY * Introduction * Climate * Rivers/Bodies of Water * Autonomous Republics and Disputed Regions * Major Cities (& Population) * Environmental Issues * Natural Hazards * CHAPTER 2: HISTORY * Introduction * 20th Century * Recent Events * CHAPTER 3: ECONOMY * Introduction * Agriculture * Industry and Service Sectors * Natural Resources * Banking and Finance * Standard of Living * Employment Trends * Public vs. Private Sector * Outlook * CHAPTER 4: SOCIETY * Introduction * Ethnic Groups and Languages * Languages * Religion * Cuisine * Traditional Dress * Gender Issues * Arts * Sports and Recreation * CHAPTER 5: SECURITY * Introduction * U.S.-Georgia Relations * Relations with Neighboring Countries * Military * Issues Affecting Stability * Looking Forward * CHAPTER 1: PROFILE * Introduction * Geography * History * Government * Media * Economy * Ethnic Groups and Languages * CHAPTER 2: RELIGION * Overview * Major Religions * Role of Religion in Government * Religion in Daily Life * Religious Holidays * Buildings of Worship * Behavior in Places of Worship * CHAPTER 3: TRADITIONS * Introduction * Formulaic Codes of Politeness * Hospitality and Gift Giving * Eating Customs * Dress Codes * Non-religious Celebrations * Dos and Don'ts * CHAPTER 4: URBAN LIFE * Urbanization * Urban Work Issues * Daily Urban Life * Urban Health Care * Education * Public Places * Urban Traffic and Transportation * Street Crime * CHAPTER 5: RURAL LIFE * Introduction * Land Ownership * Ethnic Distribution * Rural Economy * Rural Transportation * Health and Education * Daily Life in the Countryside * Who's in Charge * Border Crossings and Checkpoints * Landmines * CHAPTER 6: FAMILY LIFE * Typical Household and Family Structure * Family Responsibilities and the Status of Women * Marriage, Divorce, and Birth * Family Events * Naming Conventions * FINAL ASSESSMENTS * FURTHER READING * FOOTNOTES

10

Inhuman Land - Jozef Czapski & Antonia Lloyd-Jones Cover Art

Inhuman Land

Inhuman Land Searching for the Truth in Soviet Russia, 1941-1942 by Jozef Czapski & Antonia Lloyd-Jones

A classic work of reportage about the Katyń Massacre during World War II by a soldier who narrowly escaped the atrocity himself. In 1941, when Germany turned against the USSR, tens of thousands of Poles—men, women, and children who were starving, sickly, and impoverished—were released from Soviet prison camps and allowed to join the Polish Army being formed in the south of Russia. One of the survivors who made the difficult winter journey was the painter and reserve officer Józef Czapski. General Anders, the army’s commander in chief, assigned Czapski the task of receiving the Poles arriving for military training; gathering accounts of what their fates had been; organizing education, culture, and news for the soldiers; and, most important, investigating the disappearance of thousands of missing Polish officers. Blocked at every level by the Soviet authorities, Czapski was unaware that in April 1940 many officers had been shot dead in Katyn forest, a crime for which Soviet Russia never accepted responsibility. Czapski’s account of the years following his release from the camp and the formation of the Polish Army, and its arduous trek through Central Asia and the Middle East to fight on the Italian front offers a stark depiction of Stalin’s Russia at war and of the suffering, stoicism, and bravery of his fellow Poles. A work of clear observation and deep compassion, Inhuman Land is one of the twentieth century’s indispensable acts of literary witness.

11

The Wars of the Roses - Dan Jones Cover Art

The Wars of the Roses

The Wars of the Roses The Fall of the Plantagenets and the Rise of the Tudors by Dan Jones

The author of the New York Times bestseller The Plantagenets and The Templars  chronicles the next chapter in British history—the historical backdrop for Game of Thrones The inspiration for the Channel 5 series Britain's Bloody Crown The crown of England changed hands five times over the course of the fifteenth century, as two branches of the Plantagenet dynasty fought to the death for the right to rule. In this riveting follow-up to  The Plantagenets , celebrated historian Dan Jones describes how the longest-reigning British royal family tore itself apart until it was finally replaced by the Tudors. Some of the greatest heroes and villains of history were thrown together in these turbulent times, from Joan of Arc to Henry V, whose victory at Agincourt marked the high point of the medieval monarchy, and Richard III, who murdered his own nephews in a desperate bid to secure his stolen crown. This was a period when headstrong queens and consorts seized power and bent men to their will. With vivid descriptions of the battles of Towton and Bosworth, where the last Plantagenet king was slain, this dramatic narrative history revels in bedlam and intrigue. It also offers a long-overdue corrective to Tudor propaganda, dismantling their self-serving account of what they called the Wars of the Roses.

12

The Wages of Destruction - Adam Tooze Cover Art

The Wages of Destruction

The Wages of Destruction The Making and Breaking of the Nazi Economy by Adam Tooze

An extraordinary mythology has grown up around the Third Reich that hovers over political and moral debate even today. Adam Tooze's controversial new book challenges the conventional economic interpretations of that period to explore how Hitler's surprisingly prescient vision- ultimately hindered by Germany's limited resources and his own racial ideology-was to create a German super-state to dominate Europe and compete with what he saw as America's overwhelming power in a soon-to- be globalized world. The Wages of Destruction is a chilling work of originality and tremendous scholarship that is already setting off debate in Germany and will fundamentally change the way in which history views the Second World War.

13

Germany - Neil MacGregor Cover Art

Germany

Germany Memories of a Nation by Neil MacGregor

For the past 140 years, Germany has been the central power in continental europe. Twenty-five years ago a new German state came into being. How much do we really understand this new Germany, and how do its people understand themselves? Neil MacGregor argues that, uniquely for any European country, no coherent, overarching narrative of Germany's history can be constructed, for in Germany both geography and history have always been unstable. Its frontiers have constantly shifted. Königsberg, home to the greatest German philosopher, Immanuel Kant, is now Kaliningrad, Russia; Strasbourg, in whose cathedral Wolfgang von Geothe, Germany's greatest writer, discovered the distinctiveness of his country's art and history, now lies within the borders of France. For most of the five hundred years covered by this book Germany has been composed of many separate political units, each with a distinct history. And any comfortable national story Germans might have told themselves before 1914 was destroyed by the events of the following thirty years. German history may be inherently fragmented, but it contains a large number of widely shared memories, awarenesses, and experiences; examining some of these is the purpose of this book. MacGregor chooses objects and ideas, people and places that still resonate in the new Germany—porcelain from Dresden and rubble from its ruins, Bauhaus design and the German sausage, the crown of Charlemagne and the gates of Buchenwald—to show us something of its collective imagination. There has never been a book about Germany quite like it. From the Hardcover edition.

14

The Secret Dossier of a Knight Templar of the Sangreal - Gretchen Cornwall Cover Art

The Secret Dossier of a Knight Templar of the Sangreal

The Secret Dossier of a Knight Templar of the Sangreal Revised Edition by Gretchen Cornwall

The Revised Edition includes New Photos, Star Charts & Information in the last chapter:   The Stars of the Magdalene The wild breadth of information reaches from King Arthur in Cumbria, the marriage of Mary Magdalene & Jesus to new observations on Bernard de Clairvaux.  The Man who put swords in the hands of Cistercian monks and created the most enigmatic chivalrous Order of all time - the Knights Templars, modeled on the Knights of Camelot. The descendants of the Templars thrive in Cumbria, a landscape steeped in the mysteries of the Dragon Tradition found in the lore of Camelot. The ancient lost kingdom of Rheged in Cumbria is the historical setting for the Knights of the Round Table. Lake Windermere is the home of the Lady of the Lake. Melusine is an early medieval elf maiden of fountains and springs with the ability to transform into a dragon. She is the inspiration for the Lady of the Lake of Arthurian tales. Noble houses of Western Europe counted her as their ancestor. I believe her to be an allusion to Mary Magdalene. Melusine was also the ancestor of the banking family so important to the Italian Renaissance, the Medici. The Magdalene line of kings called the Merovingians, springs from the French King, Merovee 374 AD to 425 AD, whose dual fathers were King Clodio and also a magical aquatic beast reminiscent of Neptune. Napoleon had a great interest in the Merovingian dynasty. He wore 300 golden bees on his coronation robe which had been excavated from the tomb of King Childebert II (570–95). Napoleon wove Templar symbolism into art and architecture, aligning himself with Templarism. The Templar Contact interviewed for the book is a Medici descendant and also of the Man in the Iron Mask, a true account made famous by Alexander Dumas. The author was given an Energetic Map of the World which correlates with the Ordnance Survey National Grid of Great Britain and includes historic and modern Templar sites! The Matrix Map of the World is explored in great detail through the lens of Quantum Physics. It is a portal to understanding the ethos behind the current generation of Knights Templar and a wide angle lens as to their thoughts on the future of humanity. Included in the Map is the location for Atlantis in the Azores. Jesuit scholar Athanasius concurs, “Site of Atlantis now beneath the sea according to the beliefs of the Egyptians and the description of Plato.” Included is a map by Athanasiusmaller that shows two small islands off the coast of America. Could these two smaller land masses shown, be the remains of Atlantean satellites and solving the riddle of the Bimini Road in Florida? Might we view the lower island as Saint John’s of Nova Scotia and the upper island as once having existed off the coast of Florida? Ancient mysteries are explored in detail. Conversations with the Templar representative are woven into the authors own research. The text is infused with the essence of the language of the angels, Enochian. The author discovered a 12th century illuminated manuscript and a star chart from 1627 which portrays Mary Magdalene as the new Queen of Heaven. Two new engravings have been added to the final chapter: The Stars of the Magdalene. Filled with codes, the two new plates reveal how this remarkable woman was venerated down through the centuries. The book is heavily illustrated to ignite your imagination and empower your inner sight. Enjoy the extensive bibliography as a tool to help you navigate your own adventurous journey ahead... for the road goes ever on...  https://thesecretdossier.co.uk/ https://www.facebook.com/TheSecretDossier/

15

Hitler and Churchill - Andrew Roberts Cover Art

Hitler and Churchill

Hitler and Churchill Secrets of Leadership by Andrew Roberts

'His book is timely and a triumph. Roberts manages to convey all the reader needs to know about two men to whom battalions of biographies have been devoted' EVENING STANDARD Adolf Hitler and Winston Churchill were two totally opposite leaders - both in what they stood for and in the way in which they seemed to lead. Award-winning historian Andrew Roberts examines their different styles of leadership and draws parallels with rulers from other eras. He also looks at the way Hitler and Churchill estimated each other as leaders, and how it affected the outcome of the war. In a world that is as dependent on leadership as any earlier age, HITLER AND CHURCHILL asks searching questions about our need to be led. In doing so, Andrew Roberts forces us to re-examine the way that we look at those who take decisions for us.

16

The Last Palace - Norman Eisen Cover Art

The Last Palace

The Last Palace Europe's Turbulent Century in Five Lives and One Legendary House by Norman Eisen

A sweeping yet intimate narrative about the last hundred years of turbulent European history, as seen through one of Mitteleuropa’s greatest houses—and the lives of its occupants   When Norman Eisen moved into the US ambassador’s residence in Prague, returning to the land his mother had fled after the Holocaust, he was startled to discover swastikas hidden beneath the furniture in his new home. These symbols of Nazi Germany were remnants of the residence’s forgotten history, and evidence that we never live far from the past.   From that discovery unspooled the twisting, captivating tale of four of the remarkable people who had called this palace home. Their story is Europe’s, and The Last Palace chronicles the upheavals that transformed the continent over the past century. There was the optimistic Jewish financial baron, Otto Petschek, who built the palace after World War I as a statement of his faith in democracy, only to have that faith shattered; Rudolf Toussaint, the cultured, compromised German general who occupied the palace during World War II, ultimately putting his life at risk to save the house and Prague itself from destruction; Laurence Steinhardt, the first postwar US ambassador whose quixotic struggle to keep the palace out of Communist hands was paired with his pitched efforts to rescue the country from Soviet domination; and Shirley Temple Black, an eyewitness to the crushing of the 1968 Prague Spring by Soviet tanks, who determined to return to Prague and help end totalitarianism—and did just that as US ambassador in 1989.   Weaving in the life of Eisen’s own mother to demonstrate how those without power and privilege moved through history, The Last Palace tells the dramatic and surprisingly cyclical tale of the triumph of liberal democracy.

17

The Wars of the Roses - Alison Weir Cover Art

The Wars of the Roses

The Wars of the Roses by Alison Weir

Lancaster and York. For much of the fifteenth century, these two families were locked in battle for control of the British monarchy. Kings were murdered and deposed. Armies marched on London. Old noble names were ruined while rising dynasties seized power and lands. The war between the royal House of Lancaster and York, the longest and most complex in British history, profoundly altered the course of the monarchy. In The Wars of the Roses, Alison Weir reconstructs this conflict with the same dramatic flair and impeccable research that she brought to her highly praised The Princes in the Tower. The first battle erupted in 1455, but the roots of the conflict reached back to the dawn of the fifteenth century, when the corrupt, hedonistic Richard II was sadistically murdered, and Henry IV, the first Lancastrian king, seized England's throne. Both Henry IV and his son, the cold warrior Henry V, ruled England ably, if not always wisely--but Henry VI proved a disaster, both for his dynasty and his kingdom. Only nine months old when his father's sudden death made him king, Henry VI became a tormented and pathetic figure, weak, sexually inept, and prey to fits of insanity. The factional fighting that plagued his reign escalated into bloody war when Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York, laid claim to the throne that was rightfully his--and backed up his claim with armed might. Alison Weir brings brilliantly to life both the war itself and the historic figures who fought it on the great stage of England. Here are the queens who changed history through their actions--the chic, unconventional Katherine of Valois, Henry V's queen; the ruthless, social-climbing Elizabeth Wydville; and, most crucially, Margaret of Anjou, a far tougher and more powerful character than her husband,, Henry VI, and a central figure in the Wars of the Roses. Here, too, are the nobles who carried the conflict down through the generations--the Beauforts, the bastard descendants of John of Gaunt, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, known to his contemporaries as "the Kingmaker"; and the Yorkist King, Edward IV, a ruthless charmer who pledged his life to cause the downfall of the House of Lancaster. The Wars of the Roses is history at its very best--swift and compelling, rich in character, pageantry, and drama, and vivid in its re-creation of an astonishing, dangerous, and often grim period of history. Alison Weir, one of the foremost authorities on the British royal family, demonstrates here that she is also one of the most dazzling stylists writing history today. From the Hardcover edition.

18

The Viking Anthology - Snorri Sturleson, Saemund Sigfusson, Saxo Grammaticus & William Morris Cover Art

The Viking Anthology

The Viking Anthology Norse Myths, Icelandic Sagas and Viking Chronicles by Snorri Sturleson, Saemund Sigfusson, Saxo Grammaticus & William Morris

This vast ebook Anthology is exploding with masterpieces of world literature, ranging from the peerless Icelandic Sagas, to the Norwegian 'Heimskringla', or the 'Chronicle of the Kings of Norway'. As well as these original texts (in English Translation), are several accompanying great works of scholarship which are an essential companion to the texts - assisting the reader in their understanding of Viking, Norse and Icelandic culture and beliefs - from their complex creation myths, to their huge array of Pagan Gods to rival the pantheons of Ancient Greece or Rome. Anyone with an interest in the rich and fascinating history of the Vikings should invest in this excellent anthology, that compiles huge numbers of work into one incredible resource. The anthology has a full table of contents that responds to every chapter within the numerous different works, and has been carefully edited and formatted to remove any errors from the text. Included in this Anthology are the following works: Norse Myths - Myths of the Norsemen - The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson - The Younger Eddas of Snorri Sturleson (with Glossary) - The Story of the Volsungs and the Niblungs - The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of the Niblungs Icelandic Sagas - The life and Death of Cormac the Skald - The Saga of Grettir the Strong - Laxdaela Saga - The Saga of Burnt Njal - The Saga of Olaf Tryggvason - The Saga of Harald the Tyrant - The Story of Frithiof the Bold - The Story of Gunnlaug the Worm and Raven the Skald - Eirik the Red's Saga Histories and Chronicles - Saxo Grammaticus - Heimskringla, or the Chronicle of the Kings of Norway

19

Aristocrats - Lawrence James Cover Art

Aristocrats

Aristocrats Power, Grace, and Decadence: Britain's Great Ruling Classes from 1066 to the Present by Lawrence James

Aristocracy means "rule by the best." For nine hundred years, the British aristocracy considered itself ideally qualified to rule others, make laws, and guide the nation. Its virtues lay in its collective wisdom, its attachment to chivalric codes, and its sense of public duty. It evolved from a medieval warrior caste into a self-assured and sophisticated elite, which made itself the champion of popular liberty: It forced King John to sign the Magna Carta and later used its power and wealth to depose a succession of tyrannical kings from Richard II to James II. Britain's liberties and constitution were the result of aristocratic bloody-mindedness and courage. Aristocrats traces the history of this remarkable supremacy. It is a story of civil wars, conquests, intrigue, chicanery, and extremes of selflessness and greed. The aristocracy survived and, in the age of the great house and the Grand Tour, governed the first industrial nation while a knot of noblemen ruled its growing empire. Under pressure from below, this political power was slowly relinquished and then shared. Yet democratic Britain retained its aristocracy: Churchill, himself the grandson of a duke, presided over a wartime cabinet that contained six hereditary peers. Lawrence James illuminates the culture of this singular caste, shows how its infatuation with classical art has forged England's heritage, how its love of sport has shaped the nation's pastimes and values, and how its scandals have entertained its public. Impeccably researched, balanced, and brilliantly told, Aristocrats is an enthralling story of survival, a stunning history of wealth, power, and influence.

20

How Paris Became Paris - Joan DeJean Cover Art

How Paris Became Paris

How Paris Became Paris The Invention of the Modern City by Joan DeJean

"This lively history charts the growth of Paris from a city of crowded alleyways and irregular buildings into a modern marvel."-- New Yorker At the beginning of the seventeenth century, Paris was known for isolated monuments but had not yet put its brand on urban space. Like other European cities, it was still emerging from its medieval past. But in a mere century Paris would be transformed into the modern and mythic city we know today. Though most people associate the signature characteristics of Paris with the public works of the nineteenth century, Joan DeJean demonstrates that the Parisian model for urban space was in fact invented two centuries earlier, when the first complete design for the French capital was drawn up and implemented. As a result, Paris saw many changes. It became the first city to tear down its fortifications, inviting people in rather than keeping them out. Parisian urban planning showcased new kinds of streets, including the original boulevard, as well as public parks and the earliest sidewalks and bridges without houses. Venues opened for urban entertainment of all kinds, from opera and ballet to a pastime invented in Paris, recreational shopping. Parisians enjoyed the earliest public transportation and street lighting, and Paris became Europe's first great walking city. A century of planned development made Paris both beautiful and exciting. It gave people reasons to be out in public as never before and as nowhere else. And it gave Paris its modern identity as a place that people dreamed of seeing. By 1700, Paris had become the capital that would revolutionize our conception of the city and of urban life.

21

The History of the Renaissance World: From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Conquest of Constantinople - Susan Wise Bauer Cover Art

The History of the Renaissance World: From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Conquest of Constantinople by Susan Wise Bauer

A lively and fascinating narrative history about the birth of the modern world. Beginning in the heady days just after the First Crusade, this volume—the third in the series that began with The History of the Ancient World and The History of the Medieval World—chronicles the contradictions of a world in transition. Popes continue to preach crusade, but the hope of a Christian empire comes to a bloody end at the walls of Constantinople. Aristotelian logic and Greek rationality blossom while the Inquisition gathers strength. As kings and emperors continue to insist on their divine rights, ordinary people all over the world seize power: the lingayats of India, the Jacquerie of France, the Red Turbans of China, and the peasants of England. New threats appear, as the Ottomans emerge from a tiny Turkish village and the Mongols ride out of the East to set the world on fire. New currencies are forged, new weapons invented, and world-changing catastrophes alter the landscape: the Little Ice Age and the Great Famine kill millions; the Black Death, millions more. In the chaos of these epoch-making events, our own world begins to take shape. Impressively researched and brilliantly told, The History of the Renaissance World offers not just the names, dates, and facts but the memorable characters who illuminate the years between 1100 and 1453—years that marked a sea change in mankind’s perception of the world.

22

London - A. N. Wilson Cover Art

London

London A History by A. N. Wilson

In its two thousand years of history, London has ruled a rainy island and a globe-spanning empire, it has endured plague and fire and bombing, it has nurtured and destroyed poets and kings, revolutionaries and financiers, geniuses and visionaries of every stripe. To distill the magic and the majesty of this infinitely enthralling city into a single brief volume would seem an impossible task–yet acclaimed biographer and novelist A. N. Wilson brilliantly accomplishes it in London: A History . Founded by the Romans, London was a flourishing provincial capital before falling into ruin with the rest of the Roman Empire. Centuries passed before the city rose to prominence once again when William the Conqueror chose to be crowned king in Westminster Abbey. In Chaucer’s day, London Bridge opened the way for expansion over the Thames. By the time Shakespeare’s plays were being mounted at the Globe, London was a dense, seething, and explosively growing metropolis–a city of brothels and taverns and delicate new palaces and pleasure gardens. With deftly sketched vignettes and memorable portraits in miniature, Wilson conjures up the essence of London through the ages–high finance and gambling during the Georgian age, John Nash’s stunning urban makeover at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, the waves of building and immigration that transformed London beyond recognition during the reign of Queen Victoria, the devastation of the two world wars, the painful and corrupt postwar rebuilding effort, and finally the glamorous, polyglot, expensive, and sometimes ridiculous London of today. Every age had its heroes and villains, from church builder Christopher Wren to jail breaker Jack Sheppard, from urbane wit Samuel Johnson to wartime prime minister Winston Churchill, and Wilson places each one in the drama of London’s history. Exuberant, opinionated, surprising, often funny, A. N. Wilson’s London is the perfect match of author and subject. In a one short irresistible volume, Wilson gives us the essence of the people, the architecture, the intrigue, the art and literature and history that make London one of the most fascinating cities in the world. From the Hardcover edition.

23

Hitler's Scientists - John Cornwell Cover Art

Hitler's Scientists

Hitler's Scientists Science, War, and the Devil's Pact by John Cornwell

An eye-opening account of the rise of science in Germany through to Hitler’s regime, and the frightening Nazi experiments that occurred during the Reich A shocking account of Nazi science, and a compelling look at the the dramatic rise of German science in the nineteenth century, its preeminence in the early twentieth, and the frightening developments that led to its collapse in 1945, this is the compelling story of German scientists under Hitler’s regime. Weaving the history of science and technology with the fortunes of war and the stories of men and women whose discoveries brought both benefits and destruction to the world, Hitler's Scientists raises questions that are still urgent today. As science becomes embroiled in new generations of weapons of mass destruction and the war against terrorism, as advances in biotechnology outstrip traditional ethics, this powerful account of Nazi science forms a crucial commentary on the ethical role of science.

24

A Journey Through Time - Geoff Keen Cover Art

A Journey Through Time

A Journey Through Time The History of the British Monarchy by Geoff Keen

I first got interested in kings and queens about ten years ago when I found myself reading a historical novel about Henry VIII. It was enthralling, but it left me wanting to know more about his ancestors. I then went on to read more. It was at this point I decided to produce a concise summary of my findings into a booklet. This booklet will be a genealogical record of all the kings and queens of England and Scotland, starting with the first king ever recorded, King Egbert of Wessex, 780 AD, and to follow them through Queen Elizabeth II, 1952. It has all the dates, when they were born, when they married, when they died, and whom followed whom. I've could it a journey through time. to perches it go to authorgeoffkeen.com

25

Cocoa at Midnight - Tom Quinn Cover Art

Cocoa at Midnight

Cocoa at Midnight The real life story of my time as a housekeeper by Tom Quinn

Kathleen Clifford was born in 1909. Her family lived in a tiny flat near Paddington Station and her earliest memories were of the smell of horses and the shrill whistle of steam trains. For a girl from the slums there was only really one option once school was over - a life in service. She started work on 1925 as a lowly kitchen maid in the London home of Lady Diana Spencer's family. Here she heard tales of the Earl's propensity for setting fire to himself, as well as enjoying the servant's gossip about who was sleeping with whom. The Spencers were just the first in a line of eccentric families for whom she worked during a career that lasted more than thirty earrs and took her from a London palace to remote medieval estates. But despite long hours, amorous butlers and mad employers, Kathleen always kept her sense of humour and knew how to have fun. On one occasion she was almost caught in bed with her boyfriend who had to jump out of the window and run down the drive in his underwear to escape the local bobby.

26

Malleus Maleficarum - James Sprenger Cover Art

Malleus Maleficarum

Malleus Maleficarum by James Sprenger

James Sprenger ( 1436/1438 - 1495 ) was a German priest born in Rheinfelden.He is believed to be the co-author of Malleus Maleficarum with Heinrich Kramer.Sprenger was not interested in witches and witch trials and many scholars believe Sprenger was named a co-author to give the book more authority since he was a priest.

27

A Decade of Italian Women - T. Adolphus Trollope Cover Art

A Decade of Italian Women

A Decade of Italian Women by T. Adolphus Trollope

First published in 1859.  Biographies of ten Italian women -- Saint Catherine of Siena, Caterina Sforza, Vittoria Colonna, Tullia D'Aragona, Olympia Morata, Isabella Andreini, Bianca Cappello, Olympia Pamfili, Elisabetta Sirani, and La Corilla.

28

Children during the Holocaust - Patricia Heberer Cover Art

Children during the Holocaust

Children during the Holocaust by Patricia Heberer

This compelling book tells the story of the Holocaust through the eyes, and fates, of its youngest victims. Following the arc of the persecutory policies of the Nazis and their sympathizers and the impact these measures had on Jewish children and adolescents, the chapters begin with the years leading to the war, to the roundups, deportations, and emigrations, to hidden life and death in the ghettos and concentration camps, and to liberation and coping in the wake of war. This volume examines the reactions of children to discrimination, the loss of livelihood in Jewish homes, and the public humiliation at the hands of fellow citizens and explores the ways in which children's experiences paralleled and diverged from their adult counterparts. The author also reflects upon the role of non-Jewish children as victims, perpetrators, and bystanders.

29

Tudors: The History of England from Henry VIII to Elizabeth I - Peter Ackroyd Cover Art

Tudors: The History of England from Henry VIII to Elizabeth I

Tudors: The History of England from Henry VIII to Elizabeth I by Peter Ackroyd

Peter Ackroyd, one of Britain's most acclaimed writers, brings the age of the Tudors to vivid life in this monumental book in his The History of England series, charting the course of English history from Henry VIII's cataclysmic break with Rome to the epic rule of Elizabeth I. Rich in detail and atmosphere, Peter Ackroyd's Tudors is the story of Henry VIII's relentless pursuit of both the perfect wife and the perfect heir; of how the brief reign of the teenage king, Edward VI, gave way to the violent reimposition of Catholicism and the stench of bonfires under "Bloody Mary." It tells, too, of the long reign of Elizabeth I, which, though marked by civil strife, plots against the queen and even an invasion force, finally brought stability. Above all, however, it is the story of the English Reformation and the making of the Anglican Church. At the beginning of the sixteenth century, England was still largely feudal and looked to Rome for direction; at its end, it was a country where good governance was the duty of the state, not the church, and where men and women began to look to themselves for answers rather than to those who ruled them.

30

Ireland - Joseph Coohill Cover Art

Ireland

Ireland A Short History by Joseph Coohill

This fourth edition of Joseph Coohill’s best-selling book has been fully updated to include the latest political, economic, and social developments in Ireland. Starting with the first prehistoric inhabitants of the island, Ireland takes readers right up to the present day through the Great Famine, Home Rule, the Good Friday Agreement, and the economic struggles of the 21st century, covering the major events that have shaped the country. Clear and lucid, Coohill’s writing paints an engaging picture of a people for whom history is a key part of present-day reality. Highly accessible, yet demonstrating a sophisticated level of analysis, this book provides a valuable resource to students and all those wishing to acquaint themselves further with the complex identity of the Irish people.

31

Rebellion: The History of England from James I to the Glorious Revolution - Peter Ackroyd Cover Art

Rebellion: The History of England from James I to the Glorious Revolution

Rebellion: The History of England from James I to the Glorious Revolution by Peter Ackroyd

Peter Ackroyd has been praised as one of the greatest living chroniclers of Britain and its people. In Rebellion, he continues his dazzling account of the history of England, beginning with the progress south of the Scottish king, James VI, who on the death of Elizabeth I became the first Stuart king of England, and ending with the deposition and flight into exile of his grandson, James II. The Stuart monarchy brought together the two nations of England and Scotland into one realm, albeit a realm still marked by political divisions that echo to this day. More importantly, perhaps, the Stuart era was marked by the cruel depredations of civil war, and the killing of a king. Shrewd and opinionated, James I was eloquent on matters as diverse as theology, witchcraft, and the abuses of tobacco, but his attitude to the English parliament sowed the seeds of the division that would split the country during the reign of his hapless heir, Charles I. Ackroyd offers a brilliant, warts-and-all portrayal of Charles's nemesis, Oliver Cromwell, Parliament's great military leader and England's only dictator, who began his career as a political liberator but ended it as much of a despot as "that man of blood," the king he executed. England's turbulent seventeenth century is vividly laid out before us, but so too is the cultural and social life of the period, notable for its extraordinarily rich literature, including Shakespeare's late masterpieces, Jacobean tragedy, the poetry of John Donne and Milton and Thomas Hobbes's great philosophical treatise, Leviathan . In addition to its account of England's royalty, Rebellion also gives us a very real sense of the lives of ordinary English men and women, lived out against a backdrop of constant disruption and uncertainty.

32

The Plantagenets - Dan Jones Cover Art

The Plantagenets

The Plantagenets The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England by Dan Jones

The New York Times bestseller that tells the story of Britain’s greatest and worst dynasty—“a real-life Game of Thrones ” ( The Wall Street Journal ) — by the author of  The Templars The first Plantagenet kings inherited a blood-soaked realm from the Normans and transformed it into an empire that stretched at its peak from Scotland to Jerusalem. In this epic narrative history of courage, treachery, ambition, and deception, Dan Jones resurrects the unruly royal dynasty that preceded the Tudors. They produced England’s best and worst kings: Henry II and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine, twice a queen and the most famous woman in Christendom; their son Richard the Lionheart, who fought Saladin in the Third Crusade; and his conniving brother King John, who was forced to grant his people new rights under the Magna Carta, the basis for our own bill of rights. Combining the latest academic research with a gift for storytelling, Jones vividly recreates the great battles of Bannockburn, Crécy, and Sluys and reveals how the maligned kings Edward II and Richard II met their downfalls. This is the era of chivalry and the Black Death, the Knights Templar, the founding of parliament, and the Hundred Years’ War, when England’s national identity was forged by the sword.

33

History of Norway - John A. Yilek Cover Art

History of Norway

History of Norway by John A. Yilek

Based on exhaustive research, History of Norway is a clear, informative and entertaining description of Norway's history from the earliest cultures of the Stone Age to today's oil and gas economy. Along the way, there are fascinating stories of Vikings, the Sami, kings and queens, farmers and fishermen, merchants and miners, the Black Death, the Hanseatic merchants, the Reformation, independence, emigration from Norway to America, polar explorers, the Nazi invasion and the Norwegian resistance in World War II, and much more!

34

The Magic Lantern - Timothy Garton Ash Cover Art

The Magic Lantern

The Magic Lantern The Revolution of '89 Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin, and Prague by Timothy Garton Ash

The Magic Lantern is one of those rare books that define a historic moment, written by a brilliant witness who was also a participant in epochal events. Whether covering Poland's first free parliamentary elections -- in which Solidarity found itself in the position of trying to limit the scope of its victory -- or sitting in at the meetings of an unlikely coalition of bohemian intellectuals and Catholic clerics orchestrating the liberation of Czechoslovakia, Garton Ash writes with enormous sympathy and power. In this book -- now with a new Afterword by the author -- Garton Ash creates a stunningly evocative portrait of the revolutions that swept Communism from Eastern Europe in 1989 and whose after-effects will resonate for years to come.

35

Versailles: A History - Robert B. Abrams Cover Art

Versailles: A History

Versailles: A History by Robert B. Abrams

King Louis XIV had many loves, but none as compelling as Versailles, the modest country estate he transformed into one of the world's most spectacular palaces. Here is the dramatic - and tragic - story of Versailles and the men and women who made it their home.

36

1066: History in an Hour - Kaye Jones Cover Art

1066: History in an Hour

1066: History in an Hour by Kaye Jones

Love history? Know your stuff with History in an Hour. During the year 1066, England had three different kings and fought three huge battles in defence of the realm, including the bloody Battle of Hastings. The result was the Norman Conquest which defined England during the Middle Ages. 1066 in an Hour will guide you through the politics and personalities of the Norman invasion. It will help you understand why William the Conqueror was victorious and introduce you to the new king and subsequent ancestor to the Plantagenets and Tudors. Know your stuff: read about 1066 in just one hour. Reviews ‘If the past is a foreign country, History in an Hour is like a high-class tour operator, offering delightfully enjoyable short breaks in the rich and diverse continent of our shared past’ Dominic Sandbrook ‘The practice of History is ever-evolving, and the History In An Hour idea brings it back up to date for the digital age’ Andrew Roberts, Bookseller ‘This is genius’ MacWorld.com About the author Kaye Jones is a history graduate and writer, specialising in the Middle Ages and gender history. She has written three titles for History In An Hour – 1066, Medieval Anarchy and Dickens – as well as articles for a range of publications, including the Institute of Historical Research’s Reviews in History, and F-Word magazine. Kaye also runs a women’s history website, Heroines and Harlots, and works as a researcher for the military charity, PTSD Resolution.

37

Rome - Matthew Kneale Cover Art

Rome

Rome A History in Seven Sackings by Matthew Kneale

"Kneale's account is a masterpiece of pacing and suspense. Characters from the city's history spring to life in his hands." — The Sunday Times (London) Novelist and historian Matthew Kneale, a longtime resident of Rome, tells the story of the Eternal City—from the early Roman Republic through the Renaissance and the Reformation to Mussolini and the German occupation in World War Two—through pivotal moments that defined its history. Rome, the Eternal City. It is a hugely popular tourist destination with a rich history, famed for such sites as the Colosseum, the Forum, the Pantheon, St. Peter’s, and the Vatican. In no other city is history as present as it is in Rome. Today visitors can stand on bridges that Julius Caesar and Cicero crossed; walk around temples in the footsteps of emperors; visit churches from the earliest days of Christianity. This is all the more remarkable considering what the city has endured over the centuries. It has been ravaged by fires, floods, earthquakes, and—most of all—by roving armies. These have invaded repeatedly, from ancient times to as recently as 1943. Many times Romans have shrugged off catastrophe and remade their city anew. Matthew Kneale uses seven of these crisis moments to create a powerful and captivating account of Rome’s extraordinary history. He paints portraits of the city before each assault, describing what it looked like, felt like, smelled like and how Romans, both rich and poor, lived their everyday lives. He shows how the attacks transformed Rome—sometimes for the better. With drama and humor he brings to life the city of Augustus, of Michelangelo and Bernini, of Garibaldi and Mussolini, and of popes both saintly and very worldly. He shows how Rome became the chaotic and wondrous place it is today. Rome: A History in Seven Sackings offers a unique look at a truly remarkable city.

38

Seven Ages of Paris - Alistair Horne Cover Art

Seven Ages of Paris

Seven Ages of Paris by Alistair Horne

In this luminous portrait of Paris, the celebrated historian gives us the history, culture, disasters, and triumphs of one of the world’s truly great cities. While Paris may be many things, it is never boring. From the rise of Philippe Auguste through the reigns of Henry IV and Louis XIV (who abandoned Paris for Versailles); Napoleon’s rise and fall; Baron Haussmann’s rebuilding of Paris (at the cost of much of the medieval city); the Belle Epoque and the Great War that brought it to an end; the Nazi Occupation, the Liberation, and the postwar period dominated by de Gaulle--Horne brings the city’s highs and lows, savagery and sophistication, and heroes and villains splendidly to life. With a keen eye for the telling anecdote and pivotal moment, he portrays an array of vivid incidents to show us how Paris endures through each age, is altered but always emerges more brilliant and beautiful than ever. The Seven Ages of Paris is a great historian’s tribute to a city he loves and has spent a lifetime learning to know. "Knowledgeable and colorful, written with gusto and love.... [An] ambitious and skillful narrative that covers the history of Paris with considerable brio and fervor." —LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK REVIEW

39

Fin-De-Siecle Vienna - Carl E. Schorske Cover Art

Fin-De-Siecle Vienna

Fin-De-Siecle Vienna Politics and Culture by Carl E. Schorske

A Pulitzer Prize Winner and landmark book from one of the truly original scholars of our time: a magnificent revelation of turn-of-the-century Vienna where out of a crisis of political and social disintegration so much of modern art and thought was born. "Not only is it a splendid exploration of several aspects of early modernism in their political context; it is an indicator of how the discipline of intellectual history is currently practiced by its most able and ambitious craftsmen. It is also a moving vindication of historical study itself, in the face of modernism's defiant suggestion that history is obsolete." -- David A. Hollinger, History Book Club Review "Each of [the seven separate studies] can be read separately....Yet they are so artfully designed and integrated that one who reads them in order is impressed by the book's wholeness and the momentum of its argument." -- Gordon A. Craig, The New Republic "A profound work...on one of the most important chapters of modern intellectual history" -- H.R. Trevor-Roper, front page, T he New York Times Book Review "Invaluable to the social and political historian...as well as to those more concerned with the arts" -- John Willett, The New York Review of Books "A work of original synthesis and scholarship. Engrossing." -- Newsweek

40

Proust's Duchess - Caroline Weber Cover Art

Proust's Duchess

Proust's Duchess How Three Celebrated Women Captured the Imagination of Fin-de-Siecle Paris by Caroline Weber

From the author of the acclaimed Queen of Fashion --a brilliant look at the glittering world of turn-of-the-century Paris through the first in-depth study of the three women Proust used to create his supreme fictional character, the Duchesse de Guermantes. Geneviève Halévy Bizet Straus; Laure de Sade, Comtesse de Adhéaume de Chevigné; and Élisabeth de Riquet de Caraman-Chimay, the Comtesse Greffulhe--these were the three superstars of fin-de-siècle Parisian high society who, as Caroline Weber says, "transformed themselves, and were transformed by those around them, into living legends: paragons of elegance, nobility, and style." All well but unhappily married, these women sought freedom and fulfillment by reinventing themselves, between the 1870s and 1890s, as icons. At their fabled salons, they inspired the creativity of several generations of writers, visual artists, composers, designers, and journalists. Against a rich historical backdrop, Weber takes the reader into these women's daily lives of masked balls, hunts, dinners, court visits, nights at the opera or theater. But we see as well the loneliness, rigid social rules, and loveless, arranged marriages that constricted these women's lives. Proust, as a twenty-year-old law student in 1892, would worship them from afar, and later meet them and create his celebrated composite character for The Remembrance of Things Past.

41

The Shortest History of Germany - James Hawes Cover Art

The Shortest History of Germany

The Shortest History of Germany by James Hawes

READ IN AN AFTERNOON. REMEMBER FOR A LIFETIME. The West is in full retreat. The Anglo-Saxon powers, great and small, withdraw into fantasies of lost greatness. Populists all over Europe cry out that immigration and globalisation are the work of a nefarious System, run by unseen masters with no national loyalties. From the Kremlin, Tsar Vladimir watches his Great Game line up, while the Baltic and Vizegrad states shiver -- and everyone looks to Berlin. But are the Germans really us, or them? This question has haunted Europe ever since Julius Caesar invented the Germani in 58 BC. How Roman did Germania ever become? Did the Germans destroy the culture of Rome, or inherit it? When did they first drive east, and did they ever truly rule there? How did Germany become, for centuries, a power-vacuum at the heart of Europe? How was Prussia born? Did Bismarck unify Germany or conquer it? Where are the roots of Adolf Hitler's Third Reich? Why did it lose? By what miracle did a better Germany arise from the rubble? Is Germany now the last Western bastion of industrial prosperity and rational politics? Or are the EU and the Euro merely window-dressing for a new German hegemony? This fresh, illuminating and concise new history makes sense of Europe's most admired and feared country. It's time for the real story of Germany.

42

A Short History of England, Ireland, and Scotland - Mary Platt Parmele Cover Art

A Short History of England, Ireland, and Scotland

A Short History of England, Ireland, and Scotland by Mary Platt Parmele

In 1707 the three kingdoms of England, Ireland, and Scotland united to form Great Britain. "One of the most astonishing transformations in European history," in the words of historian Simon Schama. In  A Short History of England, Ireland, and Scotland  Mary Platt Parmele traces the origins and development of each nation from the dark ages to the modern era.

43

Alfred the Great - Asser Cover Art

Alfred the Great

Alfred the Great Asser's Life of King Alfred and Other Contemporary Sources by Asser

Asser's Life of King Alfred, written in 893, is a revealing account of one of the greatest of medieval kings. Composed by a monk of St David's in Wales who became Bishop of Sherborne in Alfred's service and worked with him in his efforts to revive religion and learning in his kingdom, this life is among the earliest surviving royal biographies. It is an admiring account of King Alfred's life, written in absorbing detail - chronicling his battles against Viking invaders and his struggle to increase the strength and knowledge of his people, and to unite his people at a time of conflict, uncertainty and war.

44

Broken Lives - Konrad H. Jarausch Cover Art

Broken Lives

Broken Lives How Ordinary Germans Experienced the 20th Century by Konrad H. Jarausch

The gripping stories of ordinary Germans who lived through World War II, the Holocaust, and Cold War partition—but also recovery, reunification, and rehabilitation Broken Lives is a gripping account of the twentieth century as seen through the eyes of ordinary Germans who came of age under Hitler and whose lives were scarred and sometimes destroyed by what they saw and did. Drawing on six dozen memoirs by the generation of Germans born in the 1920s, Konrad Jarausch chronicles the unforgettable stories of people who not only lived through the Third Reich, World War II, the Holocaust, and Cold War partition, but also participated in Germany's astonishing postwar recovery, reunification, and rehabilitation. Written decades after the events, these testimonies, many of them unpublished, look back on the mistakes of young people caught up in the Nazi movement. In many, early enthusiasm turns to deep disillusionment as the price of complicity with a brutal dictatorship--fighting at the front, aerial bombardment at home, murder in the concentration camps—becomes clear. Bringing together the voices of men and women, perpetrators and victims, Broken Lives reveals the intimate human details of historical events and offers new insights about persistent questions. Why did so many Germans support Hitler through years of wartime sacrifice and Nazi inhumanity? How did they finally distance themselves from this racist dictatorship and come to embrace human rights? Jarausch argues that this generation's focus on its own suffering, often maligned by historians, ultimately led to a more critical understanding of national identity—one that helped transform Germany from a military aggressor into a pillar of European democracy. The result is a powerful account of the everyday experiences and troubling memories of average Germans who journeyed into, through, and out of the abyss of a dark century.

45

Summer of Blood - Dan Jones Cover Art

Summer of Blood

Summer of Blood England's First Revolution by Dan Jones

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Plantagenets and a top authority on the historical events that inspired Game of Thrones , a vivid, blood-soaked account of one of the most famous rebellions in history—the first mass uprising by the people of England against their feudal masters — by the author of The Templars   In the summer of 1381, ravaged by poverty and oppressed by taxes, the people of England rose up and demanded that their voices be heard. A ragtag army, led by the mysteri­ous Wat Tyler and the visionary preacher John Ball, rose up against the fourteen-year-old Richard II and his most powerful lords and knights, who risked their property and their lives in a desperate battle to save the English crown. Dan Jones brings this incendiary moment to life and captures both the idealism and brutality of that fate­ful summer, when a brave group of men and women dared to challenge their overlords, demand that they be treated equally, and fight for freedom.

46

Mark Antony - Patricia Southern Cover Art

Mark Antony

Mark Antony A Life by Patricia Southern

The life of one of the towering figures of Roman history, Mark Antony, politician, soldier, ally to Julius Caesar, lover of Cleopatra. History has not been kind to Mark Antony, but then he was probably his own worst enemy, fatally flawed, too fond of wine and women, extravagant, impetuous, reckless, always in debt, and attached to all the wrong people. There is some truth in this list of Antony's failings, but the propaganda machine of his enemy, Octavian, ensured that these facets of Antony's character were the only ones to survive. There is no mention of the fact that Caesar, who could not afford to promote incompetent assistants, found in Antony a very able lieutenant. Nor is it acknowledged that immediately after the assassination of Caesar in 44 BC, it was Antony and not Octavian who held the state together, when it could so easily have slipped into chaos. In modern eyes, influenced by Shakespeare, Antony is perhaps the ultimate tragic hero, who gave up everything for the love of a woman, Cleopatra VII, ruler of Egypt. Octavian presented Antony as a weakling, completely dominated by Cleopatra, and therefore a threat to Rome by dint of his association with the unbridled ambitions of the Egyptian Queen to rule the world. While Antony attended to the eastern half of the Roman world, shoring up Octavian whenever he needed troops, ships, and money, Octavian eventually planned to bring him down, embarking on a smear campaign to convince the Roman people that Antony should be eliminated. The result was civil war and the defeat of Antony in the naval battle of Actium. In Alexandria, Antony and Cleopatra committed suicide in 30 BC. Octavian buried them side by side, and took total control of Rome and Egypt.

47

Hope and Glory - Peter Clarke Cover Art

Hope and Glory

Hope and Glory Britain 1900-2000 by Peter Clarke

Peter Clarke brilliantly challenges the commonly held view of Britain in the twentieth century as a nation in decline. Adopting a wide perspective, he examines the political. social and economic changes that transformed Britain. He looks at how jobs and prices, food and shelter, and education and welfare, shaped society and explores such areas as architecture, sport and popular culture. Embracing a century of national experience, Hope and Glory superbly conveys the diverse aspects of three generations who lived through unparalleled change.

48

The Northern Conquest - Katherine Holman Cover Art

The Northern Conquest

The Northern Conquest Vikings In Britain and Ireland by Katherine Holman

Most historical accounts examine the Viking Age in one part rather than the whole region of the British Isles and Ireland. Very few pay attention to the continued contact between England and Scandinavia in the post-Norman Conquest period. This book aims to offer an alternative approach by presenting a history of the Viking Age which considers the whole area up to and beyond the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Vikings have been traditionally portrayed as brutal barbarians who sailed to Britain and Ireland to loot, rape and pillage. The evidence presented here suggests a considerably less dramatic but no less fascinating picture which reveals the Vikings' remarkable achievements and their influence in shaping the political history of these islands. Katherine Holman discusses their skills as farmers, their linguistic and artistic contribution, their rituals and customs and the conflict between paganism and Christianity, showing that the Viking cultural impact was complex and often rich. Based on extensive and original research, The Northern Conquest presents the available evidence and guides the reader through the process of interpreting it. This is not restricted to historical documents alone, but also includes archaeology, runes, inscriptions, artefacts and linguistic evidence to provide different and complementary types of information. In addition, the book considers the contemporary question of the Vikings' genetic legacy. Interest in the Viking Age is thriving and expanding, both in Britain and in North America. Highly readable and casting new light on the period, this book will appeal to a wide audience.

49

Empire of Guns - Priya Satia Cover Art

Empire of Guns

Empire of Guns The Violent Making of the Industrial Revolution by Priya Satia

By a prize-winning young historian, an authoritative work that reframes the Industrial Revolution, the expansion of British empire, and emergence of industrial capitalism by presenting them as inextricable from the gun trade "A fascinating and important glimpse into how violence fueled the industrial revolution, Priya Satia's book stuns with deep scholarship and sparkling prose."-- Siddhartha Mukherjee, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Emperor of All Maladies We have long understood the Industrial Revolution as a triumphant story of innovation and technology. Empire of Guns , a rich and ambitious new book by award-winning historian Priya Satia, upends this conventional wisdom by placing war and Britain's prosperous gun trade at the heart of the Industrial Revolution and the state's imperial expansion. Satia brings to life this bustling industrial society with the story of a scandal: Samuel Galton of Birmingham, one of Britain's most prominent gunmakers, has been condemned by his fellow Quakers, who argue that his profession violates the society's pacifist principles. In his fervent self-defense, Galton argues that the state's heavy reliance on industry for all of its war needs means that every member of the British industrial economy is implicated in Britain's near-constant state of war. Empire of Guns uses the story of Galton and the gun trade, from Birmingham to the outermost edges of the British empire, to illuminate the nation's emergence as a global superpower, the roots of the state's role in economic development, and the origins of our era's debates about gun control and the "military-industrial complex" -- that thorny partnership of government, the economy, and the military. Through Satia's eyes, we acquire a radically new understanding of this critical historical moment and all that followed from it. Sweeping in its scope and entirely original in its approach, Empire of Guns is a masterful new work of history -- a rigorous historical argument with a human story at its heart.

50

The Devils' Alliance - Roger Moorhouse Cover Art

The Devils' Alliance

The Devils' Alliance Hitler's Pact with Stalin, 1939-1941 by Roger Moorhouse

antly, the pact laid the groundwork for Soviet control of Eastern Europe, a power grab that would define the post-war order. Drawing on memoirs, diaries, and official records from newly opened Soviet archives, The Devils' Alliance is the authoritative work on one of the seminal episodes of World War II. In his characteristically rich and detailed prose, Moorhouse paints a vivid picture of the pact's origins and its enduring influence as a crucial turning point, in both the war and in modern history.

IMPORTANT NOTE: To read the ebooks you must have Apple's free iBooks App installed on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch.

If you don't have the free iBooks app for the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch you can download it from the iTunes store by clicking on the link below:

Download the iBooks App for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch

Comments

Books

Ebook Charts

iBookstore Ebook Best Sellers

Fiction Ebook Best Sellers

Non-Fiction Ebook Best Sellers

iTunes Audio Book Charts

Audio Book Best Sellers

Amazon Top 10 Book Charts

iTunes Christmas Charts

iTunes Music Charts

Most Popular Music Charts

iTunes Movie Charts

Top Movies

iTunes TV Charts

Top Television Shows

iTunes iOS App Charts

Top iPhone Apps

Top iPad & iPad Mini Apps

International iTunes Charts