Top Latin American History Ebooks

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The Path Between the Seas - David McCullough Cover Art

The Path Between the Seas

The Path Between the Seas The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914 by David McCullough

The National Book Award–winning epic chronicle of the creation of the Panama Canal, a first-rate drama of the bold and brilliant engineering feat that was filled with both tragedy and triumph, told by master historian David McCullough. From the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Truman , here is the national bestselling epic chronicle of the creation of the Panama Canal. In The Path Between the Seas, acclaimed historian David McCullough delivers a first-rate drama of the sweeping human undertaking that led to the creation of this grand enterprise. The Path Between the Seas tells the story of the men and women who fought against all odds to fulfill the 400-year-old dream of constructing an aquatic passageway between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It is a story of astonishing engineering feats, tremendous medical accomplishments, political power plays, heroic successes, and tragic failures. Applying his remarkable gift for writing lucid, lively exposition, McCullough weaves the many strands of the momentous event into a comprehensive and captivating tale. Winner of the National Book Award for history, the Francis Parkman Prize, the Samuel Eliot Morison Award, and the Cornelius Ryan Award (for the best book of the year on international affairs), The Path Between the Seas is a must-read for anyone interested in American history, the history of technology, international intrigue, and human drama.

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Cuba (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize) - Ada Ferrer Cover Art

Cuba (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize)

Cuba (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize) An American History by Ada Ferrer

WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE IN HISTORY WINNER OF THE LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE IN HISTORY “Full of…lively insights and lucid prose” ( The Wall Street Journal ) an epic, sweeping history of Cuba and its complex ties to the United States—from before the arrival of Columbus to the present day—written by one of the world’s leading historians of Cuba. In 1961, at the height of the Cold War, the United States severed diplomatic relations with Cuba, where a momentous revolution had taken power three years earlier. For more than half a century, the stand-off continued—through the tenure of ten American presidents and the fifty-year rule of Fidel Castro. His death in 2016, and the retirement of his brother and successor Raúl Castro in 2021, have spurred questions about the country’s future. Meanwhile, politics in Washington—Barack Obama’s opening to the island, Donald Trump’s reversal of that policy, and the election of Joe Biden—have made the relationship between the two nations a subject of debate once more. Now, award-winning historian Ada Ferrer delivers an “important” ( The Guardian ) and moving chronicle that demands a new reckoning with both the island’s past and its relationship with the United States. Spanning more than five centuries, Cuba: An American History provides us with a front-row seat as we witness the evolution of the modern nation, with its dramatic record of conquest and colonization, of slavery and freedom, of independence and revolutions made and unmade. Along the way, Ferrer explores the sometimes surprising, often troubled intimacy between the two countries, documenting not only the influence of the United States on Cuba but also the many ways the island has been a recurring presence in US affairs. This is a story that will give Americans unexpected insights into the history of their own nation and, in so doing, help them imagine a new relationship with Cuba; “readers will close [this] fascinating book with a sense of hope” ( The Economist ). Filled with rousing stories and characters, and drawing on more than thirty years of research in Cuba, Spain, and the United States—as well as the author’s own extensive travel to the island over the same period—this is a stunning and monumental account like no other.

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Open Veins of Latin America - Eduardo Galeano Cover Art

Open Veins of Latin America

Open Veins of Latin America Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent by Eduardo Galeano

The classic survey of Latin America's social and cultural history, with a new introduction by Isabel Allende Since its U.S. debut a quarter-century ago, this brilliant text has set a new standard for historical scholarship of Latin America. It is also an outstanding political economy, a social and cultural narrative of the highest quality, and perhaps the finest description of primitive capital accumulation since Marx. Rather than chronology, geography, or political successions, Eduardo Galeano has organized the various facets of Latin American history according to the patterns of five centuries of exploitation. Thus he is concerned with gold and silver, cacao and cotton, rubber and coffee, fruit, hides and wool, petroleum, iron, nickel, manganese, copper, aluminum ore, nitrates, and tin. These are the veins which he traces through the body of the entire continent, up to the Rio Grande and throughout the Caribbean, and all the way to their open ends where they empty into the coffers of wealth in the United States and Europe. Weaving fact and imagery into a rich tapestry, Galeano fuses scientific analysis with the passions of a plundered and suffering people. An immense gathering of materials is framed with a vigorous style that never falters in its command of themes. All readers interested in great historical, economic, political, and social writing will find a singular analytical achievement, and an overwhelming narrative that makes history speak, unforgettably. This classic is now further honored by Isabel Allende’s inspiring introduction. Universally recognized as one of the most important writers of our time, Allende once again contributes her talents to literature, to political principles, and to enlightenment.

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The Lost City of the Monkey God - Douglas Preston Cover Art

The Lost City of the Monkey God

The Lost City of the Monkey God A True Story by Douglas Preston

The #1 New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller, named one of the best books of the year by The Boston Globe and National Geographic: acclaimed journalist Douglas Preston takes readers on a true adventure deep into the Honduran rainforest in this riveting narrative about the discovery of a lost civilization -- culminating in a stunning medical mystery. Since the days of conquistador Hernán Cortés, rumors have circulated about a lost city of immense wealth hidden somewhere in the Honduran interior, called the White City or the Lost City of the Monkey God. Indigenous tribes speak of ancestors who fled there to escape the Spanish invaders, and they warn that anyone who enters this sacred city will fall ill and die. In 1940, swashbuckling journalist Theodore Morde returned from the rainforest with hundreds of artifacts and an electrifying story of having found the Lost City of the Monkey God-but then committed suicide without revealing its location. Three quarters of a century later, bestselling author Doug Preston joined a team of scientists on a groundbreaking new quest. In 2012 he climbed aboard a rickety, single-engine plane carrying the machine that would change everything: lidar, a highly advanced, classified technology that could map the terrain under the densest rainforest canopy. In an unexplored valley ringed by steep mountains, that flight revealed the unmistakable image of a sprawling metropolis, tantalizing evidence of not just an undiscovered city but an enigmatic, lost civilization. Venturing into this raw, treacherous, but breathtakingly beautiful wilderness to confirm the discovery, Preston and the team battled torrential rains, quickmud, disease-carrying insects, jaguars, and deadly snakes. But it wasn't until they returned that tragedy struck: Preston and others found they had contracted in the ruins a horrifying, sometimes lethal-and incurable-disease. Suspenseful and shocking, filled with colorful history, hair-raising adventure, and dramatic twists of fortune, THE LOST CITY OF THE MONKEY GOD is the absolutely true, eyewitness account of one of the great discoveries of the twenty-first century.

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Conquistador - Buddy Levy Cover Art

Conquistador

Conquistador Hernan Cortes, King Montezuma, and the Last Stand of the Aztecs by Buddy Levy

In an astonishing work of scholarship that reads like an adventure thriller, historian Buddy Levy records the last days of the Aztec empire and the two men at the center of an epic clash of cultures. “I and my companions suffer from a disease of the heart which can be cured only with gold.” — Hernán Cortés It was a moment unique in human history, the face-to-face meeting between two men from civilizations a world apart. Only one would survive the encounter. In 1519, Hernán Cortés arrived on the shores of Mexico with a roughshod crew of adventurers and the intent to expand the Spanish empire. Along the way, this brash and roguish conquistador schemed to convert the native inhabitants to Catholicism and carry off a fortune in gold. That he saw nothing paradoxical in his intentions is one of the most remarkable—and tragic—aspects of this unforgettable story of conquest. In Tenochtitlán, the famed City of Dreams, Cortés met his Aztec counterpart, Montezuma: king, divinity, ruler of fifteen million people, and commander of the most powerful military machine in the Americas. Yet in less than two years, Cortés defeated the entire Aztec nation in one of the most astonishing military campaigns ever waged. Sometimes outnumbered in battle thousands-to-one, Cortés repeatedly beat seemingly impossible odds. Buddy Levy meticulously researches the mix of cunning, courage, brutality, superstition, and finally disease that enabled Cortés and his men to survive. Conquistador is the story of a lost kingdom—a complex and sophisticated civilization where floating gardens, immense wealth, and reverence for art stood side by side with bloodstained temples and gruesome rites of human sacrifice. It’s the story of Montezuma—proud, spiritual, enigmatic, and doomed to misunderstand the stranger he thought a god. Epic in scope, as entertaining as it is enlightening, Conquistador is history at its most riveting. Praise for Conquistador “Prodigiously researched and stirringly told,  Conquistador  is a rarity: an invaluable history lesson that also happens to be a page-turning read.” —Jeremy Schaap, bestselling author of  Cinderella Man: James J. Braddock, Max Baer and the Greatest Upset in Boxing History,  and  Triumph: The Untold Story of Jesse Owens and Hitler’s Olympics   “Sweeping and majestic . . . A pulse-quickening narrative.” —Neal Bascomb, author of  Red Mutiny: Eleven Fateful Days on the Battleship Potemkin

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The Confederados - Cyrus B. Dawsey & James M. Dawsey Cover Art

The Confederados

The Confederados Old South Immigrants in Brazil by Cyrus B. Dawsey & James M. Dawsey

This collection of essays--which also includes a previously unpublished narrative by an original settler-- examines the fascinating experiences of southern Confederate exiles in Brazil and their continuing legacy. During the late 1860s Southerners dissatisfied with the outcome of the Civil War and fearful of the extent of Union reprisals migrated to Brazil to build a new life for themselves. The Confederados --the great majority from Alabama and Texas--began a century-long adventure to establish a new homeland and to preserve important elements of their Old South heritage. For more than a hundred years, descendants of the original settlers have largely maintained their language and customs while contributing to Brazil’s economy and society. Here, scholars from many fields examine every aspect of this unique mingling of cultures within the larger historical and cultural context.

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Populismo jesuita - Loris Zanatta Cover Art

Populismo jesuita

Populismo jesuita Perón, Fidel, Chávez, Bergoglio by Loris Zanatta

"¿Existe un "populismo jesuita"? ¿América Latina es su tierra elegida? La respuesta de este libro es inequívoca: sí, existe e impregna a la historia." Con esas preguntas, y esa afirmación, comienza Loris Zanatta su ensayo. El origen de esa historia está en la Conquista, con las primeras misiones jesuíticas, que llegan al nuevo mundo con la idea de instaurar el reino de dios en la tierra. Luego, en el siglo XX, América latina fue pródiga en la emergencia de líderes populistas de raíz cristiana. Sin necesidad de hacer un inventario completo, podemos citar a Juan Domingo Perón, Fidel Castro, Hugo Chávez. Más allá de sus diferencias, tienen un rasgo común: la utopía de un pueblo armónico unido a su líder por una fe política tan intensa e inflexible que es una fe religiosa. Una comunión espiritual. Esta teología política ha tomado nuevos bríos en el siglo XXI, gracias a la presencia y la prédica del Papa Francisco. Aquellos que no participan de ella, quedan fuera del pueblo y son el enemigo. Tienen distintos nombres: liberalismo, culto de lo individual, lo extranjero, capitalismo egoísta. Proponen el odio, mientras el populismo afirma predicar el amor. Todo está legitimado por la batalla contra quienes son hostiles a la patria soberana y la pureza original del pueblo. Pero como demuestra Loris Zanatta en este libro desafiante y esclarecedor, los resultados resultan al menos paradójicos, cuando no desastrosos. En vez de proponer modelos que generen riqueza, se lucha contra ella, porque es sinónimo de corrupción. Al mismo tiempo, se eterniza y profundiza la pobreza, que es una garantía de integridad moral. Al cabo, el auténtico legado estos populismos jesuitas es el llamado pobrismo. Con su correlato natural: más desigualdad, más autoritarismo, más intolerancia, menos crecimiento y menos pluralismo.

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Elena Holmberg. La mujer que sabía demasiado - ANDREA BASCONI Cover Art

Elena Holmberg. La mujer que sabía demasiado

Elena Holmberg. La mujer que sabía demasiado El crimen que desnuda la interna de la dictadura militar by ANDREA BASCONI

El caso Holmberg desnuda la historia de una víctima poco usual para la dictadura militar: ella era una de ellos. «Ando en problemas con los marinos del ministerio», le dijo Elena Holmberg a su hermano, unos días antes de que su cuerpo apareciera flotando en el río Luján, a la altura de Tigre. Elena era diplomática de carrera, hija de una familia patricia argentina y prima hermana del ex presidente de facto Alejandro Agustín Lanusse. Una mujer de derecha conservadora confesa. Antiperonista y contraria a cualquier manifestación de izquierda. Trabajó desde 1972 en la embajada argentina en París, donde más tarde estuvo al mando del Centro Piloto, hasta que en los últimos meses de 1978 se ordenó sorpresivamente su traslado a Buenos Aires. Esta apasionante investigación periodística de Andrea Basconi, narrada como si fuera una novela, reconstruye qué sucedió desde que a Elena la obligaron a subir a un Chevy que huyó a toda velocidad por la calle Uruguay. ¿Qué sabía Elena que era tan comprometedor para el almirante Massera? ¿ Hasta dónde llegaron las esquirlas del delirio de poder y las internas de la última dictadura militar? Si Massera no se había reunido con la cúpula montonera y no les había pagado un millón de dólares para garantizarse una alianza que terminara por destrozar a su enemigo íntimo, como sostenía Elena, ¿por qué los marinos la eliminaron luego de las reuniones de la funcionaria con sus confidentes?

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Bad Mexicans: Race, Empire, and Revolution in the Borderlands - Kelly Lytle Hernandez Cover Art

Bad Mexicans: Race, Empire, and Revolution in the Borderlands

Bad Mexicans: Race, Empire, and Revolution in the Borderlands by Kelly Lytle Hernandez

“Rebel historian” Kelly Lytle Hernández reframes our understanding of U.S. history in this groundbreaking narrative of revolution in the borderlands. Bad Mexicans tells the dramatic story of the magonistas, the migrant rebels who sparked the 1910 Mexican Revolution from the United States. Led by a brilliant but ill-tempered radical named Ricardo Flores Magón, the magonistas were a motley band of journalists, miners, migrant workers, and more, who organized thousands of Mexican workers—and American dissidents—to their cause. Determined to oust Mexico’s dictator, Porfirio Díaz, who encouraged the plunder of his country by U.S. imperialists such as Guggenheim and Rockefeller, the rebels had to outrun and outsmart the swarm of U. S. authorities vested in protecting the Diaz regime. The U.S. Departments of War, State, Treasury, and Justice as well as police, sheriffs, and spies, hunted the magonistas across the country. Capturing Ricardo Flores Magón was one of the FBI’s first cases. But the magonistas persevered. They lived in hiding, wrote in secret code, and launched armed raids into Mexico until they ignited the world’s first social revolution of the twentieth century. Taking readers to the frontlines of the magonista uprising and the counterinsurgency campaign that failed to stop them, Kelly Lytle Hernández puts the magonista revolt at the heart of U.S. history. Long ignored by textbooks, the magonistas threatened to undo the rise of Anglo-American power, on both sides of the border, and inspired a revolution that gave birth to the Mexican-American population, making the magonistas’ story integral to modern American life.

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Fire & Blood - T. R. Fehrenbach Cover Art

Fire & Blood

Fire & Blood A History of Mexico by T. R. Fehrenbach

Mexican history comes to life in this “fascinating” work by the author of Lone Star: A History of Texas and the Texans ( The Christian Science Monitor ). Fire & Blood brilliantly depicts the succession of tribes and societies that have variously called Mexico their home, their battleground, and their legacy. This is the tale of the indigenous people who forged from this rugged terrain a wide-ranging civilization; of the Olmec, Maya, Toltec, and Aztec dynasties, which exercised their sophisticated powers through bureaucracy and religion; of the Spanish conquistadors, whose arrival heralded death, disease, and a new vision of continental domination. Author T. R. Fehrenbach connects these threads with the story of modern-day, independent Mexico, a proud nation struggling to balance its traditions against opportunities that often seem tantalizingly out of reach.   From the Mesoamerican empires to the Spanish Conquest and the Mexican Revolution, peopled by the legendary personalities of Mexican history—Montezuma, Cortés, Santa Anna, Juárez, Maximilian, Díaz, Pancho Villa, and Zapata— Fire & Blood is a “deftly organized and well-researched” work of popular history ( Library Journal ) .  

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Mexico - Enrique Krauze Cover Art

Mexico

Mexico Biogaphy of Power by Enrique Krauze

The concentration of power in the caudillo (leader) is as much a formative element of Mexican culture and politics as the historical legacy of the Aztec emperors, Cortez, the Spanish Crown, the Mother Church and the mixing of the Spanish and Indian population into a mestizo culture. Krauze shows how history becomes biography during the century of caudillos from the insurgent priests in 1810 to Porfirio and the Revolution in 1910. The Revolutionary era, ending in 1940, was dominated by the lives of seven presidents -- Madero, Zapata, Villa, Carranza, Obregon, Calles and Cardenas. Since 1940, the dominant power of the presidency has continued through years of boom and bust and crisis. A major question for the modern state, with today's president Zedillo, is whether that power can be decentralized, to end the cycles of history as biographies of power.

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The Real Odessa - Uki Goñi Cover Art

The Real Odessa

The Real Odessa How Perón Brought the Nazi War Criminals to Argentina by Uki Goñi

The history of President Peron’s conspiracy to protect Nazi war criminals: “a chilling, detailed story of one of Argentina’s most shameful secrets” ( Foreign Affairs ).   It has long been known that, after the Allied victory of World War II, Adolf Eichmann, Josef Mengele, Erich Priebke and many other Nazi war criminals found refuge in Argentina. In this book, Argentinian historian Uki Goni reveals the complex networks that made their escapes possible—and demonstrates that the operation was organized with the enthusiastic support of President Juan Peron. Even at this late date, when so much is known about the complicity of the Catholic Church and Allied intelligence agencies in the flight of the Nazis, Goni’s historical revelations are truly shocking.   This edition of  The Real Odessa  includes a revised introduction and conclusion, with a new afterword containing material that focuses on the Vatican’s complicity in providing sanctuary for war criminals.

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The Falklands War - Martin Middlebrook Cover Art

The Falklands War

The Falklands War by Martin Middlebrook

A detailed history of the brief 1980s conflict between the UK and Argentina, from the author of The First Day on the Somme . With the surprise Argentine invasion of the remote Falkland Islands on April 2, 1982, the United Kingdom found itself at war. Due to the resolve of a determined Prime Minister and the resourcefulness of the Armed Forces, a task force, codenamed Operation Corporate, was quickly dispatched. Remarkably, just over two months later, the islands were liberated, and the invaders defeated. By any standards this was an outstanding feat of arms, cooperation made possible by political resolve, sound planning, strong leadership and the courage and determination of the British forces. Martin Middlebrook, the renowned military historian, has skillfully weaved the many strands of this extraordinary achievement into a fascinating, thorough and highly readable account. Thanks to his meticulous research he covers action at sea, on the land and in the air as well as providing the strategic overview. The author’s use of many first-hand accounts reveals what it was like to be part of this audacious military endeavor. The experiences of the Falkland Islanders during the Argentine occupation are also included. Thirty years on, Middlebrook’s The Falklands War is still an authoritative and thoroughly readable account of this historic enterprise. Originally published as Operation Corporate: The Story of the Falklands War, 1982 . Praise for The Falklands War “The author’s descriptions of confrontations in the air, on the sea and on the various battlegrounds are superb, as are his explanations of the use of new weapons, such as the Sea Harrier and the Exocet missile.” — Publishers Weekly

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Murder City - Charles Bowden Cover Art

Murder City

Murder City Ciudad Juarez and the Global Economy's New Killing Fields by Charles Bowden

Ciudad Juarez lies just across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas. A once-thriving border town, it now resembles a failed state. Infamously known as the place where women disappear, its murder rate exceeds that of Baghdad. In Murder City , Charles Bowden-one of the few journalists who spent extended periods of time in Juarez-has written an extraordinary account of what happens when a city disintegrates. Interweaving stories of its inhabitants-a beauty queen who was raped, a repentant hitman, a journalist fleeing for his life-with a broader meditation on the town's descent into anarchy, Bowden reveals how Juarez's culture of violence will not only worsen, but inevitably spread north. Heartbreaking, disturbing, and unforgettable, Murder City was written at the height of his powers and established Bowden as one of America's leading journalists.

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The History of Colombia: A Fascinating Guide to Colombian History - David Robbins Cover Art

The History of Colombia: A Fascinating Guide to Colombian History

The History of Colombia: A Fascinating Guide to Colombian History by David Robbins

Unearth the incredible history of one of South America's most beautiful countries. Colombia is an amazing country with a rich history, vibrant geography, and diverse people - now, in this audiobook, you'll uncover a profound and insightful exploration of this fascinating country, packed with detailed insights and interesting facts. Covering everything from the early history and development to colonization and Colombia's long journey to its place as a republic in the 21st century, this comprehensive guide is perfect for anyone looking to study this extraordinary country. Offering an exploration of the natural beauty and geographic elements of Colombia, this book also examines the country's economy and exports, the advances in science and technology which the country's scientists and doctors have pioneered, and the past and present governments who have built the groundwork to launch Colombia into the future. Colombia is a fascinating country with a rich story to tell. The History of Colombia is ideal for any fan of South America and world history, offering a powerful exploration of Colombia's past, present, and possible future. Buy now to unearth the history of Colombia today!

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The Story of Simon Bolivar - Guillermo Sherwell Cover Art

The Story of Simon Bolivar

The Story of Simon Bolivar by Guillermo Sherwell

"These few pages, devoted to the life and work of Simon Bolivar, the great South American Liberator, will attain their object if the reader understands and appreciates how unusual a man Bolivar was. Every citizen of the United States of America must respect and venerate his sacred memory, as the Liberator and Father of five countries, the man who assured the independence of the rest of the South American peoples of Spanish speech; the man who conceived the plans of Pan-American unity which those who came after him have elaborated, and the man who, having conquered all his enemies and seen at his feet peoples and laws, effected the greatest conquest, that of himself, sacrificing all his aspirations and resigning his power, to go and die, rewarded by the ingratitude of those who owed him their existence as free men. The more the life of this man is studied, the greater he appears, and the nearer he seems to the superhuman." -Guillermo Sherwell

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México antes de ser México: El preclásico mesoamericano - Patricio Cover Art

México antes de ser México: El preclásico mesoamericano

México antes de ser México: El preclásico mesoamericano Rocanrol dedicado a los olmecas y amigos que los acompañan by Patricio

Desde la zona montañosa central de Veracruz. Patricio, monero y aspirante a aprendiz de historiador. ¿La cultura olmeca fue la cultura madre de Mesoamérica, o eso es pura madre? ¿Eran africanos los olmecas? ¿Fueron extraterrestres los mayas? ¿Quién inventó la escritura, el calendario y la numeración en Mesoamérica? ¿Cómo y para qué se usaba todo eso? ¿Los zapotecos inventaron las tlayudas? ¿Los danzantes de Monte Albán bailaban cumbia? Esas y muchas otras preguntas son respondidas en este segundo tomo de México antes de ser México que, además de muchos monitos e ilustraciones, le contiene información confiable y actualizada sobre los orígenes de los diversos pueblos que florecieron y se desarrollaron en Mesoamérica. Entérese de lo que ocurrió durante el llamado periodo Preclásico en los territorios de la América media y conozca, sin demasiado esfuerzo, esa parte de nuestra historia y de nuestra cultura -o más bien, de nuestras culturas- que nunca nos enseñaron en la escuela. ¡Buen provecho!

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El Narco - Ioan Grillo Cover Art

El Narco

El Narco Inside Mexico's Criminal Insurgency by Ioan Grillo

"Essential reading."-Steve Coll, NewYorker.com A gripping, sobering account of how Mexican drug gangs have transformed into a criminal insurgency that threatens the nation's democracy and reaches across to the United States. The world has watched, stunned, the bloodshed in Mexico. Forty thousand murdered since 2006; police chiefs shot within hours of taking office; mass graves comparable to those of civil wars; car bombs shattering storefronts; headless corpses heaped in town squares. And it is all because a few Americans are getting high. Or is it part of a worldwide shadow economy that threatens Mexico's democracy? The United States throws Black Hawk helicopters, DEA assistance, and lots of money at the problem. But in secret, Washington is at a loss. Who are these mysterious figures who threaten Mexico's democracy? What is El Narco? El Narco is not a gang; it is a movement and an industry drawing in hundreds of thousands, from bullet-riddled barrios to marijuana-covered mountains. The conflict spawned by El Narco has given rise to paramilitary death squads battling from Guatemala to the Texas border (and sometimes beyond). In this "propulsive ... high-octane" book (Publishers Weekly), Ioan Grillo draws the first definitive portrait of Mexico's cartels and how they have radically transformed.

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The Motorcycle Diaries - Ernesto Che Guevara Cover Art

The Motorcycle Diaries

The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto Che Guevara

The book of the popular movie STARRING GAEL GARCIA BERNAL NOW A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER   The young Che Guevara’s lively and highly entertaining travel diary, now a popular movie and a New York Times bestseller. This new, expanded edition features exclusive, unpublished photos taken by the 23-year-old Ernesto on his journey across a continent, and a tender preface by Aleida Guevara, offering an insightful perspective on the man and the icon.   “A journey, a number of journeys. Ernesto Guevara in search of adventure, Ernesto Guevara in search of America, Ernesto Guevara in search of Che. On this journey of journeys, solitude found solidarity, ‘I’ turned into ‘we’.” —Eduardo Galeano   “When I read these notes for the first time, I was quite young myself and I immediately identified with this man who narrated his adventures in such a spontaneous manner… To tell you the truth, the more I read, the more I was in love with the boy my father had been…” —Aleida Guevara   “Our film is about a young man, Che, falling in love with a continent and finding his place in it.” —Walter Salles, director of “The Motorcycle Diaries.”   “As his journey progresses, Guevara’s voice seems to deepen, to darken, colored by what he witnesses in his travels. He is still poetic, but now he comments on what he sees, though still poetically, with a new awareness of the social and political ramifications of what’s going on around him.”—January Magazine

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A Small Place - Jamaica Kincaid Cover Art

A Small Place

A Small Place by Jamaica Kincaid

A brilliant look at colonialism and its effects in Antigua--by the author of Annie John "If you go to Antigua as a tourist, this is what you will see. If you come by aeroplane, you will land at the V. C. Bird International Airport. Vere Cornwall (V. C.) Bird is the Prime Minister of Antigua. You may be the sort of tourist who would wonder why a Prime Minister would want an airport named after him--why not a school, why not a hospital, why not some great public monument. You are a tourist and you have not yet seen . . ." So begins Jamaica Kincaid's expansive essay, which shows us what we have not yet seen of the ten-by-twelve-mile island in the British West Indies where she grew up. Lyrical, sardonic, and forthright by turns, in a Swiftian mode, A Small Place cannot help but amplify our vision of one small place and all that it signifies.

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Black in Latin America - Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Cover Art

Black in Latin America

Black in Latin America by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Selected as a 2012 Outstanding Title by AAUP University Press Books for Public and Secondary School Libraries 12.5 million Africans were shipped to the New World during the Middle Passage. While just over 11.0 million survived the arduous journey, only about 450,000 of them arrived in the United States. The rest—over ten and a half million—were taken to the Caribbean and Latin America. This astonishing fact changes our entire picture of the history of slavery in the Western hemisphere, and of its lasting cultural impact. These millions of Africans created new and vibrant cultures, magnificently compelling syntheses of various African, English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish influences. Despite their great numbers, the cultural and social worlds that they created remain largely unknown to most Americans, except for certain popular, cross-over musical forms. So Henry Louis Gates, Jr. set out on a quest to discover how Latin Americans of African descent live now, and how the countries of their acknowledge—or deny—their African past; how the fact of race and African ancestry play themselves out in the multicultural worlds of the Caribbean and Latin America. Starting with the slave experience and extending to the present, Gates unveils the history of the African presence in six Latin American countries—Brazil, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Mexico, and Peru—through art, music, cuisine, dance, politics, and religion, but also the very palpable presence of anti-black racism that has sometimes sought to keep the black cultural presence from view. In Brazil, he delves behind the façade of Carnaval to discover how this ‘rainbow nation’ is waking up to its legacy as the world’s largest slave economy. In Cuba, he finds out how the culture, religion, politics and music of this island is inextricably linked to the huge amount of slave labor imported to produce its enormously profitable 19th century sugar industry, and how race and racism have fared since Fidel Castro’s Communist revolution in 1959. In Haiti, he tells the story of the birth of the first-ever black republic, and finds out how the slaves’s hard fought liberation over Napoleon Bonaparte’s French Empire became a double-edged sword. In Mexico and Peru, he explores the almost unknown history of the significant numbers of black people—far greater than the number brought to the United States—brought to these countries as early as the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and the worlds of culture that their descendants have created in Vera Cruz on the Gulf of Mexico, the Costa Chica region on the Pacific, and in and around Lima, Peru. Professor Gates’ journey becomes ours as we are introduced to the faces and voices of the descendants of the Africans who created these worlds. He shows both the similarities and distinctions between these cultures, and how the New World manifestations are rooted in, but distinct from, their African antecedents. “Black in Latin America” is the third instalment of Gates’s documentary trilogy on the Black Experience in Africa, the United States, and in Latin America. In America Behind the Color Line, Professor Gates examined the fortunes of the black population of modern-day America. In Wonders of the African World, he embarked upon a series of journeys to reveal the history of African culture. Now, he brings that quest full-circle in an effort to discover how Africa and Europe combined to create the vibrant cultures of Latin America, with a rich legacy of thoughtful, articulate subjects whose stories are astonishingly moving and irresistibly compelling.

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The History of the Conquest of Mexico - William H. Prescott Cover Art

The History of the Conquest of Mexico

The History of the Conquest of Mexico by William H. Prescott

The story of the fall of the Mexica/Aztec civilisation in Mexico is one of the most astonishing episodes ever to occur in history; and in the skilful hands of William H. Prescott, one of America's greatest historians, it takes on a thrilling new dimension. Richly filled with detail, Prescott intricately describes the complex civilisation of the Mexica/Aztec people, before beginning the compelling tale of their ultimate defeat at the hands of Hernan Cortes' tiny band of ruthless Spanish conquistadors. This is one of the greatest and most riveting events in all history, retold by one of the great masters of historical narrative.

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The Lost City of Z - David Grann Cover Art

The Lost City of Z

The Lost City of Z A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon by David Grann

The #1 New York Times bestseller from the author of Killers of the Flower Moon In 1925, the legendary British explorer Percy Fawcett ventured into the Amazon jungle, in search of a fabled civilization. He never returned. Over the years countless perished trying to find evidence of his party and the place he called “The Lost City of Z.” In this masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, journalist David Grann interweaves the spellbinding stories of Fawcett’s quest for “Z” and his own journey into the deadly jungle, as he unravels the greatest exploration mystery of the twentieth century.  Look for David Grann’s new book, The Wager, coming in April 2023!

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Deep Down Dark - Héctor Tobar Cover Art

Deep Down Dark

Deep Down Dark The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free by Héctor Tobar

When the San José mine collapsed outside of Copiapó, Chile, in August 2010, it trapped thirty-three miners beneath thousands of feet of rock for a record-breaking sixty-nine days. The entire world watched what transpired above-ground during the grueling and protracted rescue, but the saga of the miners' experiences below the Earth's surface—and the lives that led them there—has never been heard until now. For Deep Down Dark , the Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Héctor Tobar received exclusive access to the miners and their tales. These thirty-three men came to think of the mine, a cavern inflicting constant and thundering aural torment, as a kind of coffin, and as a church where they sought redemption through prayer. Even while still buried, they all agreed that if by some miracle any of them escaped alive, they would share their story only collectively. Héctor Tobar was the person they chose to hear, and now to tell, that story. The result is a masterwork or narrative journalism—a riveting, at times shocking, emotionally textured account of a singular human event. A New York Times bestseller, Deep Down Dark brings to haunting, tactile life the experience of being imprisoned inside a mountain of stone, the horror of being slowly consumed by hunger, and the spiritual and mystical elements that surrounded working in such a dangerous place. In its stirring final chapters, it captures the profound way in which the lives of everyone involved in the disaster were forever changed.

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Haiti: The Aftershocks of History - Laurent Dubois Cover Art

Haiti: The Aftershocks of History

Haiti: The Aftershocks of History by Laurent Dubois

A passionate and insightful account by a leading historian of Haiti that traces the sources of the country's devastating present back to its turbulent and traumatic history Even before the 2010 earthquake destroyed much of the country, Haiti was known as a benighted place of poverty and corruption. Maligned and misunderstood, the nation has long been blamed by many for its own wretchedness. But as acclaimed historian Laurent Dubois makes clear, Haiti's troubled present can only be understood by examining its complex past. The country's difficulties are inextricably rooted in its founding revolution—the only successful slave revolt in the history of the world; the hostility that this rebellion generated among the colonial powers surrounding the island nation; and the intense struggle within Haiti itself to define its newfound freedom and realize its promise. Dubois vividly depicts the isolation and impoverishment that followed the 1804 uprising. He details how the crushing indemnity imposed by the former French rulers initiated a devastating cycle of debt, while frequent interventions by the United States—including a twenty-year military occupation—further undermined Haiti's independence. At the same time, Dubois shows, the internal debates about what Haiti should do with its hard-won liberty alienated the nation's leaders from the broader population, setting the stage for enduring political conflict. Yet as Dubois demonstrates, the Haitian people have never given up on their struggle for true democracy, creating a powerful culture insistent on autonomy and equality for all. Revealing what lies behind the familiar moniker of "the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere," this indispensable book illuminates the foundations on which a new Haiti might yet emerge.

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Conquest - Hugh Thomas Cover Art

Conquest

Conquest Cortes, Montezuma, and the Fall of Old Mexico by Hugh Thomas

Drawing on newly discovered sources and writing with brilliance, drama, and profound historical insight, Hugh Thomas presents an engrossing narrative of one of the most significant events of Western history. Ringing with the fury of two great empires locked in an epic battle, Conquest captures in extraordinary detail the Mexican and Spanish civilizations and offers unprecedented in-depth portraits of the legendary opponents, Montezuma and Cortés. Conquest is an essential work of history from one of our most gifted historians.

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Leyendas Puertorriqueñas - Cayetano Coll y Toste Cover Art

Leyendas Puertorriqueñas

Leyendas Puertorriqueñas Colección de Leyendas de Puerto Rico by Cayetano Coll y Toste

Una colección de las magníficas leyendas escritas por Cayetano Coll y Toste de su serie de libros Leyendas Puertorriqueñas. Cayetano Coll y Toste nos lleva a conocer, cómo era Puerto Rico en la época colonial española y cómo era la vida de los Taínos y la de los esclavos. Sus temas principales fueron: el amor, la religión, la superstición, la piratería, el Taíno y los esclavos negros. Sus leyendas legendarias empiezan con la Colonización, recreando las proezas y amoríos de los Conquistadores y terminan en el siglo XIX, en el cual vivió. He aquí sus magníficas leyendas.

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Colonia y República: ensayos de aproximación - Rafael Arráiz Lucca Cover Art

Colonia y República: ensayos de aproximación

Colonia y República: ensayos de aproximación by Rafael Arráiz Lucca

En "Colonia y Republica: ensayos de aproximación" su autor entrega investigaciones esclarecedoras sobre aspectos neurálgicos de la venezolanidad. Comienza con el trazado de un mapa para metabolizar el Bicentenario de las repúblicas americanas y, luego, se adentra en aspectos epicéntricos de nuestra vida colonial: las relaciones de Fray Pedro de Aguado, nuestro primer historiador; la esclavitud; los años de la Compañía Guipuzcoana; la obra portentosa de Juan German Roscio; diversos ángulos de la personalidad y la obra de Páez, Miranda, Bolívar; así como un análisis singular de los hechos del 19 de abril de 1810. Del período republicano, entre otros asuntos, se detiene a ubicar la importancia de la generación de 1928; la política de industrialización sustitutiva de importaciones (ISI), iniciada en 1946; el llamado trienio adeco (1945-1948); la figura histórica de Rómulo Betancourt y sus explicaciones del golpe de Estado del 18 de octubre de 1945; el pacto de Puntofijo y, finalmente, teje una útil historia de la cultura venezolana del siglo XX. Esta obra de penetración profunda ensancha el camino que conduce a la mejor comprensión de aspectos fundamentales de nuestra vida social, siempre con la prosa ensayística que distingue a su autor, no exenta de ironía, humor y revelaciones particulares, así como prolija en fuentes documentales y argumentos. En ella, se conciben Colonia y República como dos períodos inseparables del mismo corpus de nuestra vida nacional.

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Gobernantes mexicanos - Will Fowler Cover Art

Gobernantes mexicanos

Gobernantes mexicanos I: 1821-1910 by Will Fowler

El investigador reunió a un grupo de especialistas para estudiar la naturaleza del presidencialismo en México y comparar las políticas de quienes gobernaron el país a lo largo de los siglos XIX y XX, con hincapié en su relación con el Poder Legislativo. El primer tomo está dedicado a quienes gobernaron México en el siglo XIX. Así, Guadalupe Victoria, Antonio López de Santa Ana, Benito Juárez, Porfirio Díaz, son protagonistas de capítulos donde, sin ignorar los rasgos biográficos, se explican los contextos sociopolíticos en que gobernaron.

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The Last Days of the Incas - Kim MacQuarrie Cover Art

The Last Days of the Incas

The Last Days of the Incas by Kim MacQuarrie

The epic story of the fall of the Inca Empire to Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro in the aftermath of a bloody civil war, and the recent discovery of the lost guerrilla capital of the Incas, Vilcabamba, by three American explorers. In 1532, the fifty-four-year-old Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro led a force of 167 men, including his four brothers, to the shores of Peru. Unbeknownst to the Spaniards, the Inca rulers of Peru had just fought a bloody civil war in which the emperor Atahualpa had defeated his brother Huascar. Pizarro and his men soon clashed with Atahualpa and a huge force of Inca warriors at the Battle of Cajamarca. Despite being outnumbered by more than two hundred to one, the Spaniards prevailed—due largely to their horses, their steel armor and swords, and their tactic of surprise. They captured and imprisoned Atahualpa. Although the Inca emperor paid an enormous ransom in gold, the Spaniards executed him anyway. The following year, the Spaniards seized the Inca capital of Cuzco, completing their conquest of the largest native empire the New World has ever known. Peru was now a Spanish colony, and the conquistadors were wealthy beyond their wildest dreams. But the Incas did not submit willingly. A young Inca emperor, the brother of Atahualpa, soon led a massive rebellion against the Spaniards, inflicting heavy casualties and nearly wiping out the conquerors. Eventually, however, Pizarro and his men forced the emperor to abandon the Andes and flee to the Amazon. There, he established a hidden capital, called Vilcabamba—only recently rediscovered by a trio of colorful American explorers. Although the Incas fought a deadly, thirty-six-year-long guerrilla war, the Spanish ultimately captured the last Inca emperor and vanquished the native resistance.

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Empire of Blue Water - Stephan Talty Cover Art

Empire of Blue Water

Empire of Blue Water Captain Morgan's Great Pirate Army, the Epic Battle for the Americas, and the Catastrophe That Ended the Outlaws' Bloody Reign by Stephan Talty

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “Talty’s vigorous history of seventeenth-century pirates of the Caribbean [is] a pleasure to read from bow to stern.”— Entertainment Weekly   “In Stephan Talty’s hands, the brilliant Captain Morgan, wicked and cutthroat though he was, proves an irresistible hero. . . . A thrilling and fascinating adventure.”—Caroline Alexander, author of The Endurance and The Bounty   The passion and violence of the age of exploration and empire come to vivid life in this story of the legendary pirate who took on the greatest military power on earth with a ragtag bunch of renegades. Awash with bloody battles, political intrigues, natural disaster, and a cast of characters more compelling, bizarre, and memorable than any found in a Hollywood swashbuckler, Empire of Blue Water brilliantly re-creates the life and times of Henry Morgan and the real pirates of the Caribbean.

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The Big Truck That Went By - Jonathan M. Katz Cover Art

The Big Truck That Went By

The Big Truck That Went By How the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster by Jonathan M. Katz

On January 12, 2010, the deadliest earthquake in the history of the Western Hemisphere struck the nation least prepared to handle it. Jonathan M. Katz, the only full-time American news correspondent in Haiti, was inside his house when it buckled along with hundreds of thousands of others. In this visceral, authoritative first-hand account, Katz chronicles the terror of that day, the devastation visited on ordinary Haitians, and how the world reacted to a nation in need. More than half of American adults gave money for Haiti, part of a monumental response totaling $16.3 billion in pledges. But three years later the relief effort has foundered. It's most basic promises—to build safer housing for the homeless, alleviate severe poverty, and strengthen Haiti to face future disasters—remain unfulfilled. The Big Truck That Went By presents a sharp critique of international aid that defies today's conventional wisdom; that the way wealthy countries give aid makes poor countries seem irredeemably hopeless, while trapping millions in cycles of privation and catastrophe. Katz follows the money to uncover startling truths about how good intentions go wrong, and what can be done to make aid "smarter." With coverage of Bill Clinton, who came to help lead the reconstruction; movie-star aid worker Sean Penn; Wyclef Jean; Haiti's leaders and people alike, Katz weaves a complex, darkly funny, and unexpected portrait of one of the world's most fascinating countries. The Big Truck That Went By is not only a definitive account of Haiti's earthquake, but of the world we live in today.

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The Sugar King of Havana - John Paul Rathbone Cover Art

The Sugar King of Havana

The Sugar King of Havana The Rise and Fall of Julio Lobo, Cuba's Last Tycoon by John Paul Rathbone

"Fascinating...A richly detailed portrait." -Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times Known in his day as the King of Sugar, Julio Lobo was the wealthiest man in prerevolutionary Cuba. He had a life fit for Hollywood: he barely survived both a gangland shooting and a firing squad, and courted movie stars such as Joan Fontaine and Bette Davis. Only when he declined Che Guevara's personal offer to become Minister of Sugar in the Communist regime did Lobo's decades-long reign in Cuba come to a dramatic end. Drawing on stories from the author's own family history and other tales of the island's lost haute bourgeoisie, The Sugar King of Havana is a rare portrait of Cuba's glittering past—and a hopeful window into its future.

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Bacardi and the Long Fight for Cuba - Tom Gjelten Cover Art

Bacardi and the Long Fight for Cuba

Bacardi and the Long Fight for Cuba The Biography of a Cause by Tom Gjelten

In this widely hailed book, NPR correspondent Tom Gjelten fuses the story of the Bacardi family and their famous rum business with Cuba's tumultuous experience over the last 150 years to produce a deeply entertaining historical narrative. The company Facundo Bacardi launched in Cuba in 1862 brought worldwide fame to the island, and in the decades that followed his Bacardi descendants participated in every aspect of Cuban life. With his intimate account of their struggles and adventures across five generations, Gjelten brings to life the larger story of Cuba's fight for freedom, its tortured relationship with America, the rise of Fidel Castro, and the violent division of the Cuban nation.

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House of Rain - Craig Childs Cover Art

House of Rain

House of Rain Tracking a Vanished Civilization Across the American Southwest by Craig Childs

A "beautifully written travelogue" that draws on the latest scholarly research as well as a lifetime of exploration to light on the extraordinary Anasazi culture of the American Southwest ( Entertainment Weekly ).  The greatest "unsolved mystery" of the American Southwest is the fate of the Anasazi, the native peoples who in the eleventh century converged on Chaco Canyon (in today's southwestern New Mexico) and built what has been called the Las Vegas of its day, a flourishing cultural center that attracted pilgrims from far and wide, a vital crossroads of the prehistoric world. The Anasazis' accomplishments -- in agriculture, in art, in commerce, in architecture, and in engineering -- were astounding, rivaling those of the Mayans in distant Central America. By the thirteenth century, however, the Anasazi were gone from Chaco. Vanished. What was it that brought about the rapid collapse of their civilization? Was it drought? pestilence? war? forced migration? mass murder or suicide? For many years conflicting theories have abounded. Craig Childs draws on the latest scholarly research, as well as on a lifetime of adventure and exploration in the most forbidding landscapes of the American Southwest, to shed new light on this compelling mystery.

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Brazil on the Rise - Larry Rohter Cover Art

Brazil on the Rise

Brazil on the Rise The Story of a Country Transformed by Larry Rohter

In this hugely praised narrative, New York Times reporter Larry Rohter takes the reader on a lively trip through Brazil's history, culture, and booming economy. Going beyond the popular stereotypes of samba, supermodels, and soccer, he shows us a stunning and varied landscape--from breathtaking tropical beaches to the lush and dangerous Amazon rainforest--and how a complex and vibrant people defy definition. He charts Brazil's amazing jump from a debtor nation to one of the world's fastest growing economies, unravels the myth of Brazil's sexually charged culture, and portrays in vivid color the underbelly of impoverished favelas. With Brazil leading the charge of the Latin American decade, this critically acclaimed history is the authoritative guide to understanding its meteoric rise.

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The Broken Spears 2007 Revised Edition - Miguel Leon-Portilla Cover Art

The Broken Spears 2007 Revised Edition

The Broken Spears 2007 Revised Edition The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico by Miguel Leon-Portilla

For hundreds of years, the history of the conquest of Mexico and the defeat of the Aztecs has been told in the words of the Spanish victors. Miguel León-Portilla has long been at the forefront of expanding that history to include the voices of indigenous peoples. In this new and updated edition of his classic  The Broken Spears , León-Portilla has included accounts from native Aztec descendants across the centuries. These texts bear witness to the extraordinary vitality of an oral tradition that preserves the viewpoints of the vanquished instead of the victors. León-Portilla's new Postscript reflects upon the critical importance of these unexpected historical accounts.

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A Nation Rising - Kenneth C. Davis Cover Art

A Nation Rising

A Nation Rising Untold Tales of Flawed Founders, Fallen Heroes, and Forgotten Fighters from America's Hidden History by Kenneth C. Davis

“History in Davis’s hands is loud, coarse, painful, funny, irreverent—and memorable.” — San Francisco Chronicle Following on his New York Times bestsellers America’s Hidden History and Don’t Know Much About History, Ken Davis explores the next chapter in the country’s hidden history: the gritty first half of the 19th century, among the most tumultuous in the nation’s short life.

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Sugar in the Blood - Andrea Stuart Cover Art

Sugar in the Blood

Sugar in the Blood A Family's Story of Slavery and Empire by Andrea Stuart

In the late 1630s, lured by the promise of the New World, Andrea Stuart’s earliest known maternal ancestor, George Ashby, set sail from England to settle in Barbados. He fell into the life of a sugar plantation owner by mere chance, but by the time he harvested his first crop, a revolution was fully under way: the farming of sugar cane, and the swiftly increasing demands for sugar worldwide, would not only lift George Ashby from abject poverty and shape the lives of his descendants, but it would also bind together ambitious white entrepreneurs and enslaved black workers in a strangling embrace. Stuart uses her own family story—from the seventeenth century through the present—as the pivot for this epic tale of migration, settlement, survival, slavery and the making of the Americas. As it grew, the sugar trade enriched Europe as never before, financing the Industrial Revolution and fuelling the Enlightenment. And, as well, it became the basis of many economies in South America, played an important part in the evolution of the United States as a world power and transformed the Caribbean into an archipelago of riches. But this sweet and hugely profitable trade—“white gold,” as it was known—had profoundly less palatable consequences in its precipitation of the enslavement of Africans to work the fields on the islands and, ultimately, throughout the American continents. Interspersing the tectonic shifts of colonial history with her family’s experience, Stuart explores the interconnected themes of settlement, sugar and slavery with extraordinary subtlety and sensitivity. In examining how these forces shaped her own family—its genealogy, intimate relationships, circumstances of birth, varying hues of skin—she illuminates how her family, among millions of others like it, in turn transformed the society in which they lived, and how that interchange continues to this day. Shifting between personal and global history, Stuart gives us a deepened understanding of the connections between continents, between black and white, between men and women, between the free and the enslaved. It is a story brought to life with riveting and unparalleled immediacy, a story of fundamental importance to the making of our world.

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When Montezuma Met Cortés - Matthew Restall Cover Art

When Montezuma Met Cortés

When Montezuma Met Cortés The True Story of the Meeting that Changed History by Matthew Restall

A dramatic rethinking of the encounter between Montezuma and Hernando Cortés that completely overturns what we know about the Spanish conquest of the Americas On November 8, 1519, the Spanish conquistador Hernando Cortés first met Montezuma, the Aztec emperor, at the entrance to the capital city of Tenochtitlan. This introduction—the prelude to the Spanish seizure of Mexico City and to European colonization of the mainland of the Americas—has long been the symbol of Cortés’s bold and brilliant military genius. Montezuma, on the other hand, is remembered as a coward who gave away a vast empire and touched off a wave of colonial invasions across the hemisphere. But is this really what happened? In a departure from traditional tellings, When Montezuma Met Cortés uses “the Meeting”—as Restall dubs their first encounter—as the entry point into a comprehensive reevaluation of both Cortés and Montezuma. Drawing on rare primary sources and overlooked accounts by conquistadors and Aztecs alike, Restall explores Cortés’s and Montezuma’s posthumous reputations, their achievements and failures, and the worlds in which they lived—leading, step by step, to a dramatic inversion of the old story. As Restall takes us through this sweeping, revisionist account of a pivotal moment in modern civilization, he calls into question our view of the history of the Americas, and, indeed, of history itself. 

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Mexico: A History - Víctor Alba Cover Art

Mexico: A History

Mexico: A History by Víctor Alba

The early European explorers were astonished at the immensity of Mexico. They were equally baffled by the customs, language, and society of the people they encountered. A surprise awaited the visitors beyond every mountain pass, for in a land in which travel was so difficult, the native inhabitants had developed vastly different lifestyles. Historians and archeologists remain uncertain as to the origins of the earliest settlers or exactly when they arrived, but they had been living there for thousands of years before being "discovered" by the Spaniards. Fortunately for historians, some Spanish explorers recorded what they saw, even while Spanish armies were annihilating the native population and destroying the indigenous culture - tearing down temples, burning religious objects, melting down precious metal artifacts. And amidst the slaughter, Spanish friars continued their mission to convert the natives to Christianity, by whatever means. Here from noted journalist Victor Alba is the dramatic story of Mexico - from the Aztecs and Mayas to the age of viceroys and the Mexican Revolution. The country evolved through decades of civil wars and revolution, one government toppled then another until finally, a modern nation-state emerged. It's a history as vast and varied as the country itself.

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Pirate Hunter of the Caribbean - David Cordingly Cover Art

Pirate Hunter of the Caribbean

Pirate Hunter of the Caribbean The Adventurous Life of Captain Woodes Rogers by David Cordingly

From renowned pirate historian David Cordingly, author of Under the Black Flag and film consultant for the original Pirates of the Caribbean, comes the thrilling story of Captain Woodes Rogers, the avenging nemesis of the worst cutthroats ever to terrorize the high seas. Once a marauding privateer himself, Woodes Rogers went from laying siege to laying down the law. During Britain’s war with Spain, Rogers sailed for the crown in sorties against Spanish targets in the Pacific; battled scurvy, hurricanes, and mutinies; captured a treasure galleon; and even rescued the castaway who inspired Robinson Crusoe . Appointed governor of the Bahamas in 1717, the fearless Rogers defended the island colony of King George I against plundering pirates and an attempted Spanish invasion. His resolute example led to the downfall of such notorious pirates as Blackbeard, Calico Jack, and the female pirates Anne Bonny and Mary Read. A vividly detailed and action-packed portrait of one of the early eighteenth century’s most colorful characters, Pirate Hunter of the Caribbean serves up history that’s as fascinating and gripping as any seafaring legend.

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The Life and Times of Mexico - Earl Shorris Cover Art

The Life and Times of Mexico

The Life and Times of Mexico by Earl Shorris

A San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of the Year. "A work of scope and profound insight into the divided soul of Mexico." —History Today The Life and Times of Mexico is a grand narrative driven by 3,000 years of history: the Indian world, the Spanish invasion, Independence, the 1910 Revolution, the tragic lives of workers in assembly plants along the border, and the experiences of millions of Mexicans who live in the United States. Mexico is seen here as if it were a person, but in the Aztec way; the mind, the heart, the winds of life; and on every page there are portraits and stories: artists, shamans, teachers, a young Maya political leader; the rich few and the many poor. Earl Shorris is ingenious at finding ways to tell this story: prostitutes in the Plaza Loreto launch the discussion of economics; we are taken inside two crucial elections as Mexico struggles toward democracy; we watch the creation of a popular "telenovela" and meet the country's greatest living intellectual. The result is a work of magnificent scope and profound insight into the divided soul of Mexico.

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The Memory of Fire Trilogy - Eduardo Galeano Cover Art

The Memory of Fire Trilogy

The Memory of Fire Trilogy Genesis, Faces and Masks, and Century of the Wind by Eduardo Galeano

All three books in the American Book Award–winning Memory of Fire Trilogy available in a single volume for the first time. Eduardo Galeano’s  Memory of Fire Trilogy  defies categorization—or perhaps creates its own. It is a passionate, razor-sharp, lyrical history of North and South America, from the birth of the continent’s indigenous peoples through the end of the twentieth century. The three volumes form a haunting and dizzying whole that resurrects the lives of Indians, conquistadors, slaves, revolutionaries, poets, and more. The first book,  Genesis , pays homage to the many origin stories of the tribes of the Americas, and paints a verdant portrait of life in the New World through the age of the conquistadors. The second book,  Faces and Masks , spans the two centuries between the years 1700 and 1900, in which colonial powers plundered their newfound territories, ultimately giving way to a rising tide of dictators. And in the final installment,  Century of the Wind , Galeano brings his story into the twentieth century, in which a fractured continent enters the modern age as popular revolts blaze from North to South. This celebrated series is a landmark of contemporary Latin American writing, and a brilliant document of culture. 

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Manana Forever? - Jorge G. Castañeda Cover Art

Manana Forever?

Manana Forever? by Jorge G. Castañeda

Why are Mexicans so successful in individual sports, but deficient in team play? Why do Mexicans dislike living in skyscrapers? Why do Mexicans love to see themselves as victims, but also love victims? And why, though the Mexican people traditionally avoid conflict, is there so much violence in a country where many leaders have died by assassination? In this shrewd and fascinating book, the renowned scholar and former foreign minister Jorge Castañeda sheds much light on the puzzling paradoxes of his native country. Here’s a nation of 110 million that has an ambivalent and complicated relationship with the United States yet is host to more American expatriates than any country in the world. Its people tend to resent foreigners yet have made the nation a hugely popular tourist destination. Mexican individualism and individual ties to the land reflect a desire to conserve the past and slow the route to uncertain modernity. Castañeda examines the future possibilities for Mexico as it becomes more diverse in its regional identities, socially more homogenous, its character and culture the instruments of change rather than sources of stagnation, its political system more open and democratic. Mañana Forever? is a compelling portrait of a nation at a crossroads.

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Farewell, Fred Voodoo - Amy Wilentz Cover Art

Farewell, Fred Voodoo

Farewell, Fred Voodoo A Letter from Haiti by Amy Wilentz

Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography, this is a brilliant writer’s account of a long, painful, ecstatic—and unreciprocated—affair with a country that has long fascinated the world. A foreign correspondent on a simple story becomes, over time and in the pages of this book, a lover of Haiti, pursuing the heart of this beautiful and confounding land into its darkest corners and brightest clearings. Farewell, Fred Voodoo is a journey into the depths of the human soul as well as a vivid portrayal of the nation’s extraordinary people and their uncanny resilience. Haiti has found in Amy Wilentz an author of astonishing wit, sympathy, and eloquence.

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Comandante - Rory Carroll Cover Art

Comandante

Comandante Hugo Chávez's Venezuela by Rory Carroll

The inside story of Hugo Chavez’s rule and complex legacy Few leaders in our time have been as divisive and enigmatic as the late Hugo Chavez. In Comandante , acclaimed journalist Rory Carroll tells the inside story of Chavez’s life, his time as Venezuela’s president, and his legacy. Based on interviews with ministers, aides, courtiers, and citizens, this intimate piece of reportage chronicles a unique experiment in power that veers among enlightenment, tyranny, comedy, and farce. Carroll also investigates the almost religious devotion of millions of Venezuelans who regarded Chavez as a savior and the loathing of those who branded him as a dictator. In beautiful prose that blends the lyricism and strangeness of magical realism with the brutal, ugly truth of authoritarianism, Comandante offers a cautionary tale for our times.

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The Maya (Ninth edition) - Michael D. Coe & Stephen Houston Cover Art

The Maya (Ninth edition)

The Maya (Ninth edition) by Michael D. Coe & Stephen Houston

"The gold standard of introductory books on the ancient Maya." —Expedition The Maya has long been established as the best, most readable introduction to the New World’s greatest ancient civilization. Coe and Houston update this classic by distilling the latest scholarship for the general reader and student. This new edition incorporates the most recent archaeological and epigraphic research, which continues to proceed at a fast pace. Among the finest new discoveries are spectacular stucco sculptures at El Zotz and Holmul, which reveal surprising aspects of Maya royalty and the founding of dynasties. Dramatic refinements in our understanding of the pace of developments of the Maya civilization have led scholars to perceive a pattern of rapid bursts of building and political formation. Other finds include the discovery of the earliest known occupant of the region, the Hoyo Negro girl, recovered from an underwater cavern in the Yucatan peninsula, along with new evidence for the first architecture at Ceibal.

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The Conquest of New Spain - Bernal Diaz Del Castillo Cover Art

The Conquest of New Spain

The Conquest of New Spain by Bernal Diaz Del Castillo

Bernal Diaz was an eyewitness to one of history's most remarkable events - the conquest of the Empire of the Aztecs, and the defeat of their Emperor Montezuma. The indomitable Diaz delivers his chronicle first-hand, vividly describing the ruthless battles, the brilliant Machiavellian strategies of Cortes, and the superstitions vacillations of Montezuma that lead to the momentous overthrow of the Aztec civilization. Despite the supremacy of their weapons and armour, the Spanish "Conquistadors" overcame astonishing odds to achieve victory.  Numbering only around 500, but powerfully motivated by a lust for gold and honor, the Spanish succeeded in either defeating or outwitting armies that numbered in the tens of thousands, before laying siege to Tenochtitlan - at the time the largest city in the known world. This is a truly astonishing text - all the more so for being true - and is both essential and enjoyable reading for anyone interested in World History. This text has been specifically designed for e-readers and contains color images, illustrations and maps, as well as an interactive table of contents for ease of navigation.

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Sweetness and Power - Sidney W. Mintz Cover Art

Sweetness and Power

Sweetness and Power The Place of Sugar in Modern History by Sidney W. Mintz

A fascinating persuasive history of how sugar has shaped the world, from European colonies to our modern diets In this eye-opening study, Sidney Mintz shows how Europeans and Americans transformed sugar from a rare foreign luxury to a commonplace necessity of modern life, and how it changed the history of capitalism and industry. He discusses the production and consumption of sugar, and reveals how closely interwoven are sugar's origins as a "slave" crop grown in Europe's tropical colonies with is use first as an extravagant luxury for the aristocracy, then as a staple of the diet of the new industrial proletariat. Finally, he considers how sugar has altered work patterns, eating habits, and our diet in modern times. "Like sugar, Mintz is persuasive, and his detailed history is a real treat." - San Francisco Chronicle

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