Top Ancient History Ebooks

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The Writing of the Gods - Edward Dolnick Cover Art

The Writing of the Gods

The Writing of the Gods The Race to Decode the Rosetta Stone by Edward Dolnick

The surprising and compelling story of two rival geniuses in an all-out race to decode one of the world’s most famous documents—the Rosetta Stone—and their twenty-year-long battle to solve the mystery of ancient Egypt’s hieroglyphs. The Rosetta Stone is one of the most famous objects in the world, attracting millions of visitors to the British museum ever year, and yet most people don’t really know what it is. Discovered in a pile of rubble in 1799, this slab of stone proved to be the key to unlocking a lost language that baffled scholars for centuries. Carved in ancient Egypt, the Rosetta Stone carried the same message in different languages—in Greek using Greek letters, and in Egyptian using picture-writing called hieroglyphs. Until its discovery, no one in the world knew how to read the hieroglyphs that covered every temple and text and statue in Egypt. Dominating the world for thirty centuries, ancient Egypt was the mightiest empire the world had ever known, yet everything about it—the pyramids, mummies, the Sphinx—was shrouded in mystery. Whoever was able to decipher the Rosetta Stone, and learn how to read hieroglyphs, would solve that mystery and fling open a door that had been locked for two thousand years. Two brilliant rivals set out to win that prize. One was English, the other French, at a time when England and France were enemies and the world’s two great superpowers. The Writing of the Gods chronicles this high-stakes intellectual race in which the winner would win glory for both himself and his nation. A riveting portrait of empires both ancient and modern, this is an unparalleled look at the culture and history of ancient Egypt and a fascinating, fast-paced story of human folly and discovery unlike any other.

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Killing Jesus - Bill O'Reilly & Martin Dugard Cover Art

Killing Jesus

Killing Jesus A History by Bill O'Reilly & Martin Dugard

Millions of readers have thrilled to bestselling authors Bill O'Reilly and historian Martin Dugard's Killing Kennedy and Killing Lincoln , page-turning works of nonfiction that have changed the way we read history. Now the iconic anchor of The O'Reilly Factor details the events leading up to the murder of the most influential man in history: Jesus of Nazareth. Nearly two thousand years after this beloved and controversial young revolutionary was brutally killed by Roman soldiers, more than 2.2 billion human beings attempt to follow his teachings and believe he is God. Killing Jesus will take readers inside Jesus's life, recounting the seismic political and historical events that made his death inevitable - and changed the world forever.

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Mythology (75th Anniversary Illustrated Edition) - Edith Hamilton & Jim Tierney Cover Art

Mythology (75th Anniversary Illustrated Edition)

Mythology (75th Anniversary Illustrated Edition) Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes by Edith Hamilton & Jim Tierney

This 75th anniversary edition of a classic bestseller is stunningly illustrated and designed to enchant fans of Greek, Roman, and Norse mythology at all ages. Since its original publication by Little, Brown and Company in 1942, Edith Hamilton's Mythology has sold millions of copies throughout the world and established itself as a perennial bestseller. For more than seven decades readers have chosen this book above all others to discover the enchanting world of mythology -- from Odysseus's adventure-filled journey to the Norse god Odin's effort to postpone the final day of doom. This deluxe, hardcover edition is fully-illustrated throughout with all-new, specially commissioned art, making it a true collector's item.

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Rubicon - Tom Holland Cover Art

Rubicon

Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman Republic by Tom Holland

A vivid historical account of the social world of Rome as it moved from republic to empire. In 49 B.C., the seven hundred fifth year since the founding of Rome, Julius Caesar crossed a small border river called the Rubicon and plunged Rome into cataclysmic civil war. Tom Holland’s enthralling account tells the story of Caesar’s generation, witness to the twilight of the Republic and its bloody transformation into an empire. From Cicero, Spartacus, and Brutus, to Cleopatra, Virgil, and Augustus, here are some of the most legendary figures in history brought thrillingly to life. Combining verve and freshness with scrupulous scholarship, Rubicon is not only an engrossing history of this pivotal era but a uniquely resonant portrait of a great civilization in all its extremes of self-sacrifice and rivalry, decadence and catastrophe, intrigue, war, and world-shaking ambition.

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Precolonial Black Africa - Cheikh Anta Diop Cover Art

Precolonial Black Africa

Precolonial Black Africa by Cheikh Anta Diop

This comparison of the political and social systems of Europe and black Africa from antiquity to the formation of modern states demonstrates the black contribution to the development of Western civilization.

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The Amazons - Adrienne Mayor Cover Art

The Amazons

The Amazons Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World by Adrienne Mayor

The real history of the Amazons in war and love Amazons—fierce warrior women dwelling on the fringes of the known world—were the mythic archenemies of the ancient Greeks. Heracles and Achilles displayed their valor in duels with Amazon queens, and the Athenians reveled in their victory over a powerful Amazon army. In historical times, Cyrus of Persia, Alexander the Great, and the Roman general Pompey tangled with Amazons. But just who were these bold barbarian archers on horseback who gloried in fighting, hunting, and sexual freedom? Were Amazons real? In this deeply researched, wide-ranging, and lavishly illustrated book, National Book Award finalist Adrienne Mayor presents the Amazons as they have never been seen before. This is the first comprehensive account of warrior women in myth and history across the ancient world, from the Mediterranean Sea to the Great Wall of China. Mayor tells how amazing new archaeological discoveries of battle-scarred female skeletons buried with their weapons prove that women warriors were not merely figments of the Greek imagination. Combining classical myth and art, nomad traditions, and scientific archaeology, she reveals intimate, surprising details and original insights about the lives and legends of the women known as Amazons. Provocatively arguing that a timeless search for a balance between the sexes explains the allure of the Amazons, Mayor reminds us that there were as many Amazon love stories as there were war stories. The Greeks were not the only people enchanted by Amazons—Mayor shows that warlike women of nomadic cultures inspired exciting tales in ancient Egypt, Persia, India, Central Asia, and China. Driven by a detective's curiosity, Mayor unearths long-buried evidence and sifts fact from fiction to show how flesh-and-blood women of the Eurasian steppes were mythologized as Amazons, the equals of men. The result is likely to become a classic.

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Secrets of the Black Hebrews - Prosper Ankh Cover Art

Secrets of the Black Hebrews

Secrets of the Black Hebrews by Prosper Ankh

Who were the original Hebrews? Were they the same people inhabiting present-day Israel? The answer is no. Abraham and his descendants were Black peoples. The successive invasions of the Assyrians, Neo-Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, and Romans are mentioned in this work, as well as the emperor Hadrian's decimation of the Jews. Jesus Christ was a Black Jew.

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A.D. 381 - Charles Freeman Cover Art

A.D. 381

A.D. 381 Heretics, Pagans, and the Christian State by Charles Freeman

In A.D. 381, Theodosius, emperor of the eastern Roman empire, issued a decree in which all his subjects were required to subscribe to a belief in the Trinity of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. This edict defined Christian orthodoxy and brought to an end a lively and wide-ranging debate about the nature of God; all other interpretations were now declared heretical. It was the first time in a thousand years of Greco-Roman civilization free thought was unambiguously suppressed. Why has Theodosius's revolution been airbrushed from the historical record? In this groundbreaking book, acclaimed historian Charles Freeman argues that Theodosius's edict and the subsequent suppression of paganism not only brought an end to the diversity of religious and philosophical beliefs throughout the empire, but created numerous theological problems for the Church, which have remained unsolved. The year A.D. 381, as Freeman puts it, was "a turning point which time forgot."

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The Woman Who Would Be King - Kara Cooney Cover Art

The Woman Who Would Be King

The Woman Who Would Be King Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt by Kara Cooney

An engrossing biography of the longest-reigning female pharaoh in Ancient Egypt and the story of her audacious rise to power.   Hatshepsut—the daughter of a general who usurped Egypt's throne—was expected to bear the sons who would legitimize the reign of her father’s family. Her failure to produce a male heir, however, paved the way for her improbable rule as a cross-dressing king. At just over twenty, Hatshepsut out-maneuvered the mother of Thutmose III, the infant king, for a seat on the throne, and ascended to the rank of pharaoh. Shrewdly operating the levers of power to emerge as Egypt's second female pharaoh, Hatshepsut was a master strategist, cloaking her political power plays in the veil of piety and sexual reinvention. She successfully negotiated a path from the royal nursery to the very pinnacle of authority, and her reign saw one of Ancient Egypt’s most prolific building periods. Constructing a rich narrative history using the artifacts that remain, noted Egyptologist Kara Cooney offers a remarkable interpretation of how Hatshepsut rapidly but methodically consolidated power—and why she fell from public favor just as quickly. The Woman Who Would Be King traces the unconventional life of an almost-forgotten pharaoh and explores our complicated reactions to women in power.

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Ancient Medicine - Vivian Nutton Cover Art

Ancient Medicine

Ancient Medicine by Vivian Nutton

The first edition of Ancient Medicine was the most complete examination of the medicine of the ancient world for a hundred years. The new edition includes the key discoveries made since the first edition, especially from important texts discovered in recent finds of papyri and manuscripts, making it the most comprehensive and up-to-date survey available. Vivian Nutton pays particular attention to the life and work of doctors in communities, links between medicine and magic, and examines the different approaches to medicine across the ancient world. The new edition includes more on Rufus and Galen as well as augmented information on Babylonia, Hellenistic medicine and Late Antiquity. With recently discovered texts made accessible for the first time, and providing new evidence, this broad exploration challenges currently held perspectives, and proves an invaluable resource for students of both classics and the history of medicine.

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Mythos - Stephen Fry Cover Art

Mythos

Mythos by Stephen Fry

Here are the thrills, grandeur, and unabashed fun of the Greek myths, stylishly retold by Stephen Fry. The legendary writer, actor, and comedian breathes life into ancient tales, from Pandora's box to Prometheus's fire, and transforms the adventures of Zeus and the Olympians into emotionally resonant and deeply funny stories, without losing any of their original wonder. Classical artwork inspired by the myths and learned notes from the author offer rich cultural context.

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The Immortality Key - Brian C. Muraresku Cover Art

The Immortality Key

The Immortality Key The Secret History of the Religion with No Name by Brian C. Muraresku

THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER As seen on The Joe Rogan Experience! A groundbreaking dive into the role psychedelics have played in the origins of Western civilization, and the real-life quest for the Holy Grail that could shake the Church to its foundations. The most influential religious historian of the 20th century, Huston Smith, once referred to it as the "best-kept secret" in history. Did the Ancient Greeks use drugs to find God? And did the earliest Christians inherit the same, secret tradition? A profound knowledge of visionary plants, herbs and fungi passed from one generation to the next, ever since the Stone Age? There is zero archaeological evidence for the original Eucharist – the sacred wine said to guarantee life after death for those who drink the blood of Jesus. The Holy Grail and its miraculous contents have never been found. In the absence of any hard data, whatever happened at the Last Supper remains an article of faith for today’s 2.5 billion Christians. In an unprecedented search for answers, The Immortality Key examines the archaic roots of the ritual that is performed every Sunday for nearly one third of the planet. Religion and science converge to paint a radical picture of Christianity’s founding event. And after centuries of debate, to solve history’s greatest puzzle. Before the birth of Jesus, the Ancient Greeks found salvation in their own sacraments. Sacred beverages were routinely consumed as part of the so-called Ancient Mysteries – elaborate rites that led initiates to the brink of death. The best and brightest from Athens and Rome flocked to the spiritual capital of Eleusis, where a holy beer unleashed heavenly visions for two thousand years. Others drank the holy wine of Dionysus to become one with the god. In the 1970s, renegade scholars claimed this beer and wine – the original sacraments of Western civilization – were spiked with mind-altering drugs. In recent years, vindication for the disgraced theory has been quietly mounting in the laboratory. The constantly advancing fields of archaeobotany and archaeochemistry have hinted at the enduring use of hallucinogenic drinks in antiquity. And with a single dose of psilocybin, the psychopharmacologists at Johns Hopkins and NYU are now turning self-proclaimed atheists into instant believers. But the smoking gun remains elusive. If these sacraments survived for thousands of years in our remote prehistory, from the Stone Age to the Ancient Greeks, did they also survive into the age of Jesus? Was the Eucharist of the earliest Christians, in fact, a psychedelic Eucharist? With an unquenchable thirst for evidence, Muraresku takes the reader on his twelve-year global hunt for proof. He tours the ruins of Greece with its government archaeologists. He gains access to the hidden collections of the Louvre to show the continuity from pagan to Christian wine. He unravels the Ancient Greek of the New Testament with the world’s most controversial priest. He spelunks into the catacombs under the streets of Rome to decipher the lost symbols of Christianity’s oldest monuments. He breaches the secret archives of the Vatican to unearth manuscripts never before translated into English. And with leads from the archaeological chemists at UPenn and MIT, he unveils the first scientific data for the ritual use of psychedelic drugs in classical antiquity. The Immortality Key reconstructs the suppressed history of women consecrating a forbidden, drugged Eucharist that was later banned by the Church Fathers. Women who were then targeted as witches during the Inquisition, when Europe’s sacred pharmacology largely disappeared. If the scientists of today have resurrected this technology, then Christianity is in crisis. Unless it returns to its roots. Featuring a Foreword by Graham Hancock, the NYT bestselling author of America Before.

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The Emerald Tablets of Thoth-The-Atlantean - Doreal Cover Art

The Emerald Tablets of Thoth-The-Atlantean

The Emerald Tablets of Thoth-The-Atlantean by Doreal

The history of the Emerald Tablets is strange and beyond the belief of modern scientists. Their antiquity is stupendous, dating back some 36,000 years B.C. The author is Thoth, an Atlantean Priest-King who founded a colony in ancient Egypt, wrote the Emerald Tablets in his native Atlantean language which was translated by Dr. Michael Doreal. This edition of the Emerald Tablets is unique in that it includes both the translation and interpretation by Dr. Doreal. Because of the tablet's reference to the Egypt and sacred geometry they became a priority reference for those studying the Flower of Life and the Merkaba meditation. As requested by the Flower of Life Organization, this edition offers Dr. Doreal's translation and interpretation in a side-by-side study format

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Hypatia - Edward J. Watts Cover Art

Hypatia

Hypatia The Life and Legend of an Ancient Philosopher by Edward J. Watts

A philosopher, mathematician, and martyr, Hypatia is one of antiquity's best known female intellectuals. During the sixteen centuries following her murder, by a mob of Christians, Hypatia has been remembered in books, poems, plays, paintings, and films as a victim of religious intolerance whose death symbolized the end of the Classical world. But Hypatia was a person before she was a symbol. Her great skill in mathematics and philosophy redefined the intellectual life of her home city of Alexandria. Her talent as a teacher enabled her to assemble a circle of dedicated male students. Her devotion to public service made her a force for peace and good government in a city that struggled to maintain trust and cooperation between pagans and Christians. Despite these successes, Hypatia fought countless small battles to live the public and intellectual life that she wanted. This book rediscovers the life Hypatia led, the unique challenges she faced as a woman who succeeded spectacularly in a man's world, and the tragic story of the events that led to her tragic murder.

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Delphi Complete Works of Cicero - Cicero Cover Art

Delphi Complete Works of Cicero

Delphi Complete Works of Cicero by Cicero

Cicero's Rome's greatest orator, Marcus Tullius Cicero was a renowned philosopher and political theorist whose influence upon the history of European literature has been immense.  For the first time in digital publishing history, readers can now enjoy Cicero’s complete works in English and Latin on their eReaders, with beautiful illustrations, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1) * Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Cicero's life and works * Features the complete works of Cicero, in both English translation and the original Latin * Concise introductions to the orations, treatises and other works * The complete speeches, with rare fragments, arranged in precise chronological order * Includes many translations previously appearing in Loeb Classical Library editions of Cicero’s works * Excellent formatting of the texts * Easily locate the orations or treatises you want to read with individual contents tables * Includes rare fragments of Cicero's epic poem, first time in digital print * Many rare treatises appearing here for the first time in digital print * Features four biographies – immerse yourself in Cicero's ancient world! * Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles CONTENTS: Orations PRO QUINCTIO PRO ROSCIO AMERINO  PRO Q. ROSCIO COMOEDO  PRO TULLIO DIVINATIO IN CAECILIUM IN VERREM  PRO FONTEIO  PRO CAECINA  PRO LEGE MANILIA PRO CLUENTIO IN TOGA CANDIDA PRO RABIRIO PERDUELLIONIS REO  PRO MURENA  IN CATILINAM I-IV  DE LEGE AGRARIA CONTRA RULLUM PRO SULLA  PRO ARCHIA POETA) PRO FLACCO POST REDITUM IN SENATU  POST REDITUM IN QUIRITES  DE HARUSPICUM RESPONSIS  DE DOMO SUA PRO SESTIO PRO CAELIO  PRO BALBO  IN VATINIUM TESTEM  DE PROVINCIIS CONSULARIBUS  IN PISONEM PRO RABIRIO POSTUMO  PRO PLANCIO  PRO MILONE PRO REGE DEIOTARO PRO MARCELLO  PRO LIGARIO PHILIPPICAE  FRAGMENTS OF SPEECHES Rhetorical and Political Treatises DE INVENTIONE (About the Composition of Arguments) DE ORATORE AD QUINTUM FRATREM LIBRI TRES (On the Orator) DE PARTITIONIBUS ORATORIAE (About the Subdivisions of Oratory) DE OPTIMO GENERE ORATORUM (About the Best Kind of Orators) DE RE PUBLICA (On the Republic) BRUTUS (Short History of Orators) ORATOR AD M. BRUTUM (About the Orator) TOPICA (Topics of Argumentation) DE LEGIBUS (On the Laws) Philosophical Treatises PARADOXA STOICORUM (Stoic Paradoxes) ACADEMICA (The Academics) DE FINIBUS BONORUM ET MALORUM (About the Ends of Goods and Evils) TUSCULANAE QUAESTIONES (Tusculum Disputations) DE NATURA DEORUM (On the Nature of the Gods) DE DIVINATIONE (On Divination) DE FATO (On Fate) CATO MAIOR DE SENECTUTE (On Old Age) LAELIUS DE AMICITIA (On Friendship) DE OFFICIIS (On Duties) Letters EPISTULAE AD ATTICUM (Letters to Atticus) EPISTULAE AD QUINTUM FRATREM (Letters to his brother Quintus) EPISTULAE AD BRUTUM (Letters to Brutus) EPISTULAE AD FAMILIARES (Letters to his friends) Poetry DE CONSULATU SUO (On Cicero’s Consulship) Spurious Works RHETORICA AD HERENNIUM (To the Tribune Publius Sulpicius Rufus) COMMENTARIOLUM PETITIONIS (Essay on Running for Consul) The Latin Texts LIST OF LATIN TEXTS The Biographies CICERO by Plutarch LIFE OF CICERO by Anthony Trollope CICERO by W. Lucas Collins ROMAN LIFE IN THE DAYS OF CICERO by Alfred John Church Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles

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Herodotus - The Histories - Herodotus Cover Art

Herodotus - The Histories

Herodotus - The Histories Volumes I and II - Complete by Herodotus

Both volumes of Herodotus Histories are presented in this unified edition, which contains all nine books in the well-regarded translation by scholar of antiquity G. C. Maccauley. Volume One The first volume opens with the established history of Greek myth, from the Trojan War onward. Rulers such as King Croesus and Cyrus II of Persia hold a heavy presence in the first passages of the text, together with the various wars and conflicts of the era.   Later, Herodotus travels to Egypt and explains the geography, the vital nature of the Nile river, and the systems of ruling and government present in that nation. Herodotus also discusses distant lands such as India and China, and their customs and trading practices.   Volume Two In contrast to the initial books, the later portions of Herodotus' Histories contain more detail on the aristocracies and rulers of each nation. Military matters at land and sea are discussed, with supreme commanders such as Alexander I of Macedon and Xerxes of Greece receiving scrutiny as to their strategic planning and behaviors.   Together with portions deemed factual and accurate are juxtapositions of Greek mythology upon the text. The famous passage concerning the rescue of the Delphic Oracle from an invading Persian army by supernatural forces is one example of myth in an otherwise historically reliable work.   Over his lifetime, Herodotus personally traveled around most of the ancient world. His expeditions to Egypt and Persia yielded discoveries significant to history, whereby local sources and libraries were consulted to better the comprehensive accuracy of his writings.  As well as his sources, Herodotus would personally observe the differing customs and behaviors of the peoples he walked among. Many of the culturally ingrained practices were considered strange, with Middle Eastern and North African traditions contrasting markedly with those of Greece and Europe.   Although much of what Herodotus wrote has been superseded by the discoveries and historic researches of later epochs, his work remains widely consulted by scholars and historians to this day. Generally praised by historians, Herodotus has since the Roman era held the title "The Father of History".

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24 Hours in Ancient Athens - Philip Matyszak Cover Art

24 Hours in Ancient Athens

24 Hours in Ancient Athens A Day in the Life of the People Who Lived There by Philip Matyszak

Spend 24 hours with the ancient Athenians. See the city through their eyes as it teeters on the edge of the fateful war that would end its golden age. Athens, 416 BC. A tenuous peace holds. The city-state’s political and military might are feared throughout the ancient world; it pushes the boundaries of social, literary and philosophical experimentation in an era when it has a greater concentration of geniuses per capita than at any other time in human history. Yet even geniuses go to the bathroom, argue with their spouse and enjoy a drink with friends. Few of the city’s other inhabitants enjoy the benefits of such a civilized society, though – as multicultural and progressive as Athens can be, many are barred from citizenship. No, for the average person, life is about making ends meet, whether that be selling fish, guarding the temple or smuggling lucrative Greek figs. During the course of a day we meet 24 Athenians from all strata of society – from the slave-girl to the councilman, the vase painter to the naval commander, the housewife to the hoplite – and get to know what the real Athens was like by spending an hour in their company. We encounter a different one of these characters every chapter, with each chapter forming an hour in the life of the ancient city. We also get to spy on the daily doings of notable Athenians through the eyes of regular people as the city hovers on the brink of the fateful war that will destroy its golden age.

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Anabasis - Xenophon Cover Art

Anabasis

Anabasis by Xenophon

An ancient Greek mercenary soldier’s account of leading an army on a dangerous march from Babylon to the Black Sea. Hired by a Persian prince hoping to take the throne from his brother, Xenophon was one professional soldier in an army of many when disaster struck and their leaders were killed or captured, leaving them stranded. Along with two others chosen by their fellow soldiers, Xenophon would lead the army to safety on the “March of the Ten Thousand.” It was a harrowing journey, and they battled their way through harsh climates and hostile enemy territories—but eventually made it home. This memoir of the adventure, known for its clear language and directness, has become a classic for those interested in ancient Greek history and military culture.

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The Spartan Regime - Paul Anthony Rahe Cover Art

The Spartan Regime

The Spartan Regime by Paul Anthony Rahe

An authoritative and refreshingly original consideration of the government and culture of ancient Sparta and her place in Greek history For centuries, ancient Sparta has been glorified in song, fiction, and popular art. Yet the true nature of a civilization described as a combination of democracy and oligarchy by Aristotle, considered an ideal of liberty in the ages of Machiavelli and Rousseau, and viewed as a forerunner of the modern totalitarian state by many twentieth-century scholars has long remained a mystery. In a bold new approach to historical study, noted historian Paul Rahe attempts to unravel the Spartan riddle by deploying the regime-oriented political science of the ancient Greeks, pioneered by Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, Xenophon, and Polybius, in order to provide a more coherent picture of government, art, culture, and daily life in Lacedaemon than has previously appeared in print, and to explore the grand strategy the Spartans devised before the arrival of the Persians in the Aegean.

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The Emperor Constantine - Michael Grant Cover Art

The Emperor Constantine

The Emperor Constantine by Michael Grant

A study of one of the ancient world's most fascinating figures. Fascinating and readable biography by a great populariser of classical civilisation. Directly responsible for momentous transformations of the Imperial scene, Constantine will always be famous as the 1st Christian Emperor of Rome, and for refounding ancient Byzantium as Constantinople - events which rank amongst the most significant in history. In art, politics, economics and particularly in religion, the life of Constantine acts as a bridge between past and present. Was he the last notable Roman Emperor, or the first medieval monarch ? Was the Great convert a saint and hero, or should we regard him as a murderer who killed his wife, his eldest son , and many of his friends to further his own ambitions? These are just some of the issues that are raised in this stimulating biography.

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In Search of the Romans (Second Edition) - James Renshaw Cover Art

In Search of the Romans (Second Edition)

In Search of the Romans (Second Edition) by James Renshaw

In Search of the Romans is a lively and informative introduction to ancient Rome. Making extensive use of ancient sources and copiously illustrated with photographs, drawings, maps and plans, now for the first time in colour, its opening two chapters guide the reader through the events of Roman history, from the foundation of the city to the fall of the empire. Subsequent chapters introduce the most important aspects of the Roman world: the army and the provinces, religion, society, and entertainment; the final two chapters focus on Pompeii and Herculaneum, the two cities destroyed by Vesuvius. New to this edition are sections on the Augustan principate, on the Roman army, on life in the provinces and on engineering innovations, while the existing text is revised throughout. The narrative includes descriptions of many individuals from the Roman world, drawn from a variety of social settings. Activity boxes and further reading lists throughout each chapter aid students' understanding of the subject. Review questions challenge students to read further and reflect on some of the most important social, political and cultural issues of ancient Rome, as well as to compare them with those of their own society. The new edition is supported by a website that includes images, maps and timelines, further reading and related links.

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Stilicho - Ian Hughes Cover Art

Stilicho

Stilicho The Vandal Who Saved Rome by Ian Hughes

A military history of the campaigns of Stilicho, the army general who became one of the most powerful men in the Western Roman Empire. Flavius Stilicho lived in one of the most turbulent periods in European history. The Western Empire was finally giving way under pressure from external threats, especially from Germanic tribes crossing the Rhine and Danube, as well as from seemingly ever-present internal revolts and rebellions. Ian Hughes explains how a Vandal (actually, Stilicho had a Vandal father and Roman mother) came to be given almost total control of the Western Empire and describes his attempts to save both the Western Empire and Rome itself from the attacks of Alaric the Goth and other barbarian invaders. Stilicho is one of the major figures in the history of the Late Roman Empire, and his actions following the death of the emperor Theodosius the Great in 395 may have helped to divide the Western and Eastern halves of the Roman Empire on a permanent basis. Yet he is also the individual who helped maintain the integrity of the West before the rebellion of Constantine III in Britain, and the crossing of the Rhine by a major force of Vandals, Sueves, and Alans—both in A.D. 406—set the scene for both his downfall and execution in 408, and the later disintegration of the West. Despite his role in this fascinating and crucial period of history, there is no other full-length biography of him in print.

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Life in Year One - Scott Korb Cover Art

Life in Year One

Life in Year One What the World Was Like in First-Century Palestine by Scott Korb

For anyone who's ever pondered what everyday life was like during the time of Jesus comes a lively and illuminating portrait of the nearly unknown world of daily life in first-century Palestine. What was it like to live during the time of Jesus? Where did people live? Who did they marry? And what was family life like? How did people survive? These are just some of the questions that Scott Korb answers in this engaging new book, which explores what everyday life entailed two thousand years ago in first-century Palestine, that tumultuous era when the Roman Empire was at its zenith and a new religion-Christianity-was born. Culling information from primary sources, scholarly research, and his own travels and observations, Korb explores the nitty-gritty of real life back then-from how people fed, housed, and groomed themselves to how they kept themselves healthy. He guides the contemporary reader through the maze of customs and traditions that dictated life under the numerous groups, tribes, and peoples in the eastern Mediterranean that Rome governed two thousand years ago, and he illuminates the intriguing details of marriage, family life, health, and a host of other aspects of first-century life. The result is a book for everyone, from the armchair traveler to the amateur historian. With surprising revelations about politics and medicine, crime and personal hygiene, this book is smart and accessible popular history at its very best.

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1177 B.C. - Eric H. Cline Cover Art

1177 B.C.

1177 B.C. The Year Civilization Collapsed: Revised and Updated by Eric H. Cline

A bold reassessment of what caused the Late Bronze Age collapse In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages," Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age—and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.

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The Egyptian Book of the Dead - E.A. Wallis Budge & Foy Scalf Cover Art

The Egyptian Book of the Dead

The Egyptian Book of the Dead The Complete Papyrus of Ani by E.A. Wallis Budge & Foy Scalf

A New Edition of the Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, Perfect for History Buffs, Budding Archaeologists, or Mythology Enthusiasts! The Egyptian Book of the Dead is unquestionably one of the most influential books in all history. Containing the ancient ritual to be performed for the dead with detailed instructions for the behavior of the soul in the afterlife, it served as the most important repository of religious authority for some three thousand years. Chapters were carved on the pyramids of the ancient 5th Dynasty, texts were written in papyrus, and selections were painted on mummy cases well into the Christian era. In a certain sense, it represented all history and research of Egyptian civilization. In the year 1888, Dr. E. A. Wallis Budge, then purchasing agent for the British Museum, followed rumors he heard of a spectacular archaeological find in Upper Egypt, and found in an 18th Dynasty tomb near Luxor a perfectly preserved papyrus scroll. It was a copy of the Egyptian Book of the Dead, written around 1500 B.C. for Ani, Royal Scribe of Thebes, Overseer of the Granaries of the Lords of Abydos, and Scribe of the Offerings of the Lords of Thebes. This Papyrus of Ani is presented here by Dr. Budge. Reproduced in full are a clear copy of the Egyptian hieroglyphs, an interlinear transliteration of their sounds (as reconstructed), a word-for-word translation, and separately a complete smooth translation. All this is preceded by an original introduction of more than 150 pages. This classic material combined with a brand-new foreword by Dr. Foy Scalf of Chicago University gives the reader has a unique opportunity to experience all the fascinating aspects of The Egyptian Book of the Dead .  

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The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean - Raoul McLaughlin Cover Art

The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean

The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean The Ancient World Economy & the Kingdoms of Africa, Arabia & India by Raoul McLaughlin

This study of ancient Roman shipping and trade across continents reveals the Roman Empire’s far-reaching impact in the ancient world.   In ancient times, large fleets of Roman merchant ships set sail from Egypt on voyages across the Indian Ocean. They sailed from Roman ports on the Red Sea to distant kingdoms on the east coast of Africa and southern Arabia. Many continued their voyages across the ocean to trade with the rich kingdoms of ancient India. Along these routes, the Roman Empire traded bullion for valuable goods, including exotic African products, Arabian incense, and eastern spices.   This book examines Roman commerce with Indian kingdoms from the Indus region to the Tamil lands. It investigates contacts between the Roman Empire and powerful African kingdoms, including the Nilotic regime that ruled Meroe and the rising Axumite Realm. Further chapters explore Roman dealings with the Arab kingdoms of southern Arabia, including the Saba-Himyarites and the Hadramaut Regime, which sent caravans along the incense trail to the ancient rock-carved city of Petra.   The first book to bring these subjects together in a single comprehensive study, The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean reveals Rome’s impact on the ancient world and explains how international trade funded the legions that maintained imperial rule.

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Invasion Earth - Jay Toney Cover Art

Invasion Earth

Invasion Earth by Jay Toney

Based on the Tablets of Enki, translated by Zechariah Sitchin, the story starts with the destruction of seven cities during the last War of the Gods. Ninurta is tasked with using nuclear weapons to destroy the Mission Control Center and spaceport in the Sinai Peninsula. After completing the mission, his wingman, Nergal, is filled with blood lust. He destroys five cities surrounding the Dead Sea. The fallout from the weapons of mass destruction kills everyone in Sumer who haven't evacuated in time. Four hundred and fifty thousand years ago, the Nephilim cross the celestial heavens in search of gold to save their planet. Alalu finds it on Earth. It is salvation for his people and a kingship for him. The Nephilim come to our solar system and establish a base on Mars, and a colony on Earth. Trouble comes from the Anunnaki workers working in the gold mines, when they revolt. To end the mutiny, Enki finds a solution. His solution is to create primitive workers who will replace the miners. He finds these primitive beings—hominids—and captures them for experimentation. He hopes that by altering their DNA, an evolutionary jump will create the workers the Anunnaki need. This temporarily brings relief to the miners, but a growing population, and disputes between the Anunnaki leaders set off a chain of events that leads to a struggle that will settle, once and for all, who shall inherit the Earth.

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The Emperor's Handbook - Marcus Aurelius Cover Art

The Emperor's Handbook

The Emperor's Handbook by Marcus Aurelius

Written in Greek, without any intention of publication, by the only Roman emperor who was also a philosopher, the THE EMPEROR’S HANDBOOK (or MEDITATIONS) of Marcus Aurelius (AD 121-180) offer a remarkable series of challenging spiritual reflections and exercises developed as the emperor struggled to understand himself and make sense of the universe.  Ranging from doubt and despair to conviction and exaltation, they cover such diverse topics as the nature of moral virtue, human rationality, divine providence, and Marcus’ own emotions.

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The Storm Before the Storm - Mike Duncan Cover Art

The Storm Before the Storm

The Storm Before the Storm The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic by Mike Duncan

The creator of the award-winning podcast series The History of Rome and Revolutions brings to life the bloody battles, political machinations, and human drama that set the stage for the fall of the Roman Republic. The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. Beginning as a small city-state in central Italy, Rome gradually expanded into a wider world filled with petty tyrants, barbarian chieftains, and despotic kings. Through the centuries, Rome's model of cooperative and participatory government remained remarkably durable and unmatched in the history of the ancient world. In 146 BC, Rome finally emerged as the strongest power in the Mediterranean. But the very success of the Republic proved to be its undoing. The republican system was unable to cope with the vast empire Rome now ruled: rising economic inequality disrupted traditional ways of life, endemic social and ethnic prejudice led to clashes over citizenship and voting rights, and rampant corruption and ruthless ambition sparked violent political clashes that cracked the once indestructible foundations of the Republic. Chronicling the years 146-78 BC, The Storm Before the Storm dives headlong into the first generation to face this treacherous new political environment. Abandoning the ancient principles of their forbearers, men like Marius, Sulla, and the Gracchi brothers set dangerous new precedents that would start the Republic on the road to destruction and provide a stark warning about what can happen to a civilization that has lost its way.

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Persian Fire - Tom Holland Cover Art

Persian Fire

Persian Fire by Tom Holland

A "fresh...thrilling" ( The Guardian ) account of the Graeco-Persian Wars. In the fifth century B.C., a global superpower was determined to bring truth and order to what it regarded as two terrorist states. The superpower was Persia, incomparably rich in ambition, gold, and men. The terrorist states were Athens and Sparta, eccentric cities in a poor and mountainous backwater: Greece. The story of how their citizens took on the Great King of Persia, and thereby saved not only themselves but Western civilization as well, is as heart-stopping and fateful as any episode in history. Tom Holland’s brilliant study of these critical Persian Wars skillfully examines a conflict of critical importance to both ancient and modern history.

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The Death of Caesar - Barry Strauss Cover Art

The Death of Caesar

The Death of Caesar The Story of History's Most Famous Assassination by Barry Strauss

In this story of the most famous assassination in history, “the last bloody day of the [Roman] Republic has never been painted so brilliantly” ( The Wall Street Journal ). Julius Caesar was stabbed to death in the Roman Senate on March 15, 44 BC—the Ides of March according to the Roman calendar. He was, says author Barry Strauss, the last casualty of one civil war and the first casualty of the next civil war, which would end the Roman Republic and inaugurate the Roman Empire. “ The Death of Caesar provides a fresh look at a well-trodden event, with superb storytelling sure to inspire awe” ( The Philadelphia Inquirer ). Why was Caesar killed? For political reasons, mainly. The conspirators wanted to return Rome to the days when the Senate ruled, but Caesar hoped to pass along his new powers to his family, especially Octavian. The principal plotters were Brutus, Cassius (both former allies of Pompey), and Decimus. The last was a leading general and close friend of Caesar’s who felt betrayed by the great man: He was the mole in Caesar’s camp. But after the assassination everything went wrong. The killers left the body in the Senate and Caesar’s allies held a public funeral. Mark Antony made a brilliant speech—not “Friends, Romans, Countrymen” as Shakespeare had it, but something inflammatory that caused a riot. The conspirators fled Rome. Brutus and Cassius raised an army in Greece but Antony and Octavian defeated them. An original, new perspective on an event that seems well known, The Death of Caesar is “one of the most riveting hour-by-hour accounts of Caesar’s final day I have read....An absolutely marvelous read” ( The Times , London).

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Rhetoric - Aristoteles Cover Art

Rhetoric

Rhetoric (Illustrated Edition) by Aristoteles

“Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence” – attributed to Aristotle Aristotle was the most famous and influential Greek philosopher in the 2,000 years after he lived, and he left his mark on everything from politics to the scientific method for the West.  Still, his most famous work is Rhetoric , his preeminent treatise on the art of persuasion. Rhetoric seems to have been a collection of notes written by Aristotle's students about his lectures, but nevertheless it has served as the foundation for the study of rhetoric ever since.  Aristotle is widely credited with being the forbearer of the study of the art of rhetoric.  This edition of Rhetoric is illustrated with pictures of the famous philosopher. 

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Plato's Collection - Plato's Cover Art

Plato's Collection

Plato's Collection 29 books by Plato's

This book contain collection of 29 books 1. The Apology 2. Crito 3. Charmides, or Temperance 4. Laches; or Courage 5. Lysis; or Friendship 6. Euthyphro 7. Menexenus 8. Ion 9. Gorgias 10. Protagoras 11. Meno 12. Euthydemus 13. Cratylus 14. Phaedo 15. Phaedrus 16. Symposium 17. The Republic 18. Theaetetus 19. Parmenides 20. Sophist 21. Statesman 22. Philebus 23. Timaeus 24. Critias 25. Laws 26. The First Alcibiades 27. The Second Alcibiades 28. Eryxias 29. The Seventh Letter About the Author Plato (c. 427-c. 347 BC) Classical Greek philosopher, mathematician, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of natural philosophy, science, and Western philosophy. Plato was originally a student of Socrates, and was as much influenced by his thinking as by what he saw as his teacher's unjust death. Plato's sophistication as a writer is evident in his Socratic dialogues; thirty-five dialogues and thirteen letters have been ascribed to him. Plato's writings have been published in several fashions; this has led to several conventions regarding the naming and referencing of Plato's texts.

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Byzantium - Robert Wernick Cover Art

Byzantium

Byzantium by Robert Wernick

Here, from New York Times bestselling author Robert Wernick, is the unforgettable story of the Byzantine Empire, which dominated the world for more than 1,000 years. Here, too, are the stories of the extraordinary emperors and generals who brought the empire into being and ultimately presided over its demise. We witness the glittering city of Constantinople from its rise to greatness through its deadly conclusion. Though Byzantium has faded away, its everlasting contributions to our world today are revealed in this fascinating history.

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History of the Peloponnesian War - Thucydides & Rex Warner Cover Art

History of the Peloponnesian War

History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides & Rex Warner

'With icy remorselessness, it puts paid to any notion that the horrors of modern history might be an aberration - for it tells of universal war, of terrorism, revolution and genocide' Tom Holland The long life-and-death struggle between Athens and Sparta plunged the ancient Greek world into decades of war. Thucydides was an Athenian and achieved the rank of general in the earlier stages of the war, and in this detailed, first-hand contemporary account he writes as both a soldier and a historian. He applies a passion for accuracy and a contempt for myth and romance in compiling a factual record of a ruinous conflict that would eventually destroy the Athenian empire. Translated by Rex Warner with an introduction and notes by M. I. Finley

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The Naked Olympics - Tony Perrottet Cover Art

The Naked Olympics

The Naked Olympics The True Story of the Ancient Games by Tony Perrottet

What was it like to attend the ancient Olympic Games? With the summer Olympics’ return to Athens, Tony Perrottet delves into the ancient world and lets the Greek Games begin again. The acclaimed author of Pagan Holiday brings attitude, erudition, and humor to the fascinating story of the original Olympic festival, tracking the event day by day to re-create the experience in all its compelling spectacle. Using firsthand reports and little-known sources—including an actual Handbook for a Sports Coach used by the Greeks— The Naked Olympics creates a vivid picture of an extravaganza performed before as many as forty thousand people, featuring contests as timeless as the javelin throw and as exotic as the chariot race. Peeling away the layers of myth, Perrottet lays bare the ancient sporting experience—including the round-the-clock bacchanal inside the tents of the Olympic Village, the all-male nude workouts under the statue of Eros, and history’s first corruption scandals involving athletes. Featuring sometimes scandalous cameos by sports enthusiasts Plato, Socrates, and Herodotus, The Naked Olympics offers essential insight into today’s Games and an unforgettable guide to the world’s first and most influential athletic festival. "Just in time for the modern Olympic games to return to Greece this summer for the first time in more than a century, Tony Perrottet offers up a diverting primer on the Olympics of the ancient kind….Well researched; his sources are as solid as sources come. It's also well writen….Perhaps no book of the season will show us so briefly and entertainingly just how complete is our inheritance from the Greeks, vulgarity and all." --The Washington Post

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The Rise of Athens - Anthony Everitt Cover Art

The Rise of Athens

The Rise of Athens The Story of the World's Greatest Civilization by Anthony Everitt

A magisterial account of how a tiny city-state in ancient Greece became history’s most influential civilization, from the bestselling author of acclaimed biographies of Cicero, Augustus, and Hadrian   Filled with tales of adventure and astounding reversals of fortune, The Rise of Athens celebrates the city-state that transformed the world—from the democratic revolution that marked its beginning, through the city’s political and cultural golden age, to its decline into the ancient equivalent of a modern-day university town.   Anthony Everitt constructs his history with unforgettable portraits of the talented, tricky, ambitious, and unscrupulous Athenians who fueled the city’s rise: Themistocles, the brilliant naval strategist who led the Greeks to a decisive victory over their Persian enemies; Pericles, arguably the greatest Athenian statesman of them all; and the wily Alcibiades, who changed his political allegiance several times during the course of the Peloponnesian War—and died in a hail of assassins’ arrows. Here also are riveting you-are-there accounts of the milestone battles that defined the Hellenic world: Thermopylae, Marathon, and Salamis among them. An unparalleled storyteller, Everitt combines erudite, thoughtful historical analysis with stirring narrative set pieces that capture the colorful, dramatic, and exciting world of ancient Greece.   Although the history of Athens is less well known than that of other world empires, the city-state’s allure would inspire Alexander the Great, the Romans, and even America’s own Founding Fathers. It’s fair to say that the Athenians made possible the world in which we live today. In this peerless new work, Anthony Everitt breathes vivid life into this most ancient story. Praise for The Rise of Athens “[An] invaluable history of a foundational civilization . . . combining impressive scholarship with involving narration.” — Booklist “Compelling . . . a comprehensive and entertaining account of one of the most transformative societies in Western history . . . Everitt recounts the high points of Greek history with flair and aplomb.” —Shelf Awareness “Highly readable . . . Everitt keeps the action moving.” — Kirkus Reviews Praise for Anthony Everitt’s The Rise of Rome “Rome’s history abounds with remarkable figures. . . . Everitt writes for the informed and the uninformed general reader alike, in a brisk, conversational style, with a modern attitude of skepticism and realism.” — The Dallas Morning News “[A] lively and readable account . . . Roman history has an uncanny ability to resonate with contemporary events.” — Maclean’s “Elegant, swift and faultless as an introduction to his subject.” —The Spectator “An engrossing history of a relentlessly pugnacious city’s 500-year rise to empire.” —Kirkus Reviews “Fascinating history and a great read.” — Chicago Sun-Times

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The Roman Way - Edith Hamilton Cover Art

The Roman Way

The Roman Way by Edith Hamilton

"No one in modern times has shown us more vividly than Edith Hamilton 'the glory that was Greece and the grandeur that was Rome.'" —New York Times In this now-classic history of Roman civilization, Edith Hamilton vividly depicts Roman life and spirit as they are revealed by the greatest writers of the age. Among these literary guides are Cicero, who left an incomparable collection of letters; Catullus, who was the quintessential poet of love; Horace, who chronicled a cruel and materialistic Rome; and the Romantics: Virgil, Livy, and Seneca. Hamilton concludes her work by contrasting the high-mindedness of Stoicism with the collapse of values as witnessed by the historian Tacitus and the satirist Juvenal.

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Alexander the Great - Anthony Everitt Cover Art

Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great His Life and His Mysterious Death by Anthony Everitt

What can we learn from the stunning rise and mysterious death of the ancient world’s greatest conqueror? An acclaimed biographer reconstructs the life of Alexander the Great in this magisterial revisionist portrait. “[An] infectious sense of narrative momentum . . . Its energy is unflagging, including the verve with which it tackles that teased final mystery about the specific cause of Alexander’s death.”— The Christian Science Monitor More than two millennia have passed since Alexander the Great built an empire that stretched to every corner of the ancient world, from the backwater kingdom of Macedonia to the Hellenic world, Persia, and ultimately to India—all before his untimely death at age thirty-three. Alexander believed that his empire would stop only when he reached the Pacific Ocean. But stories of both real and legendary events from his life have kept him evergreen in our imaginations with a legacy that has meant something different to every era: in the Middle Ages he became an exemplar of knightly chivalry, he was a star of Renaissance paintings, and by the early twentieth century he’d even come to resemble an English gentleman. But who was he in his own time? In Alexander the Great , Anthony Everitt judges Alexander’s life against the criteria of his own age and considers all his contradictions. We meet the Macedonian prince who was naturally inquisitive and fascinated by science and exploration, as well as the man who enjoyed the arts and used Homer’s great epic the Iliad as a bible. As his empire grew, Alexander exhibited respect for the traditions of his new subjects and careful judgment in administering rule over his vast territory. But his career also had a dark side. An inveterate conqueror who in his short life built the largest empire up to that point in history, Alexander glorified war and was known to commit acts of remarkable cruelty. As debate continues about the meaning of his life, Alexander's death remains a  mystery. Did he die of natural causes—felled by a fever—or did his marshals, angered by his tyrannical behavior, kill him? An explanation of his death can lie only in what we know of his life, and Everitt ventures to solve that puzzle, offering an ending to Alexander’s story that has eluded so many for so long.

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Nicomachean Ethics (Illustrated Edition) - Aristoteles Cover Art

Nicomachean Ethics (Illustrated Edition)

Nicomachean Ethics (Illustrated Edition) by Aristoteles

“Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence” – attributed to Aristotle Along with Plato and Socrates, Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) is one of the triumvirate of philosophers responsible for the establishment of Western philosophy as it exists today. Socrates, Plato and Aristotle were among the first to refine philosophical thought, and Socrates is credited with devising the Socratic Method as a way to argue and debate points rationally.  The Ancient Greek philosophers further stressed the importance of virtue and stoicism, advocating the improvement of one’s self through constant learning and knowledge.  These teachings and practices formed the foundation for philosophy and psychology as fields of study. Still, Aristotle was very much his own philosopher. Though he studied at Plato’s famous academy, he was not hesitant to counter or criticize Plato’s philosophical stances on certain issues. Aristotle was the most renowned Ancient Greek philosopher for nearly 2,000 years, and his most famous work is Rhetoric , his preeminent treatise on the art of persuasion. Aristotle is widely credited with being the forbearer of the study of the art of rhetoric.  This edition of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is specially formatted with a Table of Contents and is illustrated with pictures of famous Greek philosophers

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The Roman Empire and the Silk Routes - Raoul McLaughlin Cover Art

The Roman Empire and the Silk Routes

The Roman Empire and the Silk Routes The Ancient World Economy & the Empires of Parthia, Central Asia & Han China by Raoul McLaughlin

A fascinating history of the intricate web of trade routes connecting ancient Rome to Eastern civilizations, including its powerful rival, the Han Empire.   The Roman Empire and the Silk Routes investigates the trade routes between Rome and the powerful empires of inner Asia, including the Parthian Empire of ancient Persia, and the Kushan Empire which seized power in Bactria (Afghanistan), laying claim to the Indus Kingdoms. Further chapters examine the development of Palmyra as a leading caravan city on the edge of Roman Syria. Raoul McLaughlin also delves deeply into Rome’s trade ventures through the Tarim territories, which led its merchants to the Han Empire of ancient China.   Having established a system of Central Asian trade routes known as the Silk Road, the Han carried eastern products as far as Persia and the frontiers of the Roman Empire. Though they were matched in scale, the Han surpassed its European rival in military technology.   The first book to address these subjects in a single comprehensive study, The Roman Empire and the Silk Routes explores Rome’s impact on the ancient world economy and reveals what the Chinese and Romans knew about their rival Empires.

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The Dark Ages - Charles Oman Cover Art

The Dark Ages

The Dark Ages by Charles Oman

In the summer of 477 A.D. a band of ambassadors, who claimed to speak the will of the decayed body which still called itself the Roman senate, appeared before the judgment-seat of the emperor Zeno, the ruler of Constantinople and the Eastern Empire. They came to announce to him that the army of the West had slain the patrician Orestes, and deposed from his throne the son of Orestes, the boy-emperor Romulus. But they did not then proceed to inform Zeno that another Caesar had been duly elected to replace their late sovereign. Embassies with such news had been common of late years, but this particular deputation, unlike any other which had yet visited the Bosphorus, came to announce to the Eastern emperor that his own mighty name sufficed for the protection of both East and West. They laid at his feet the diadem and purple robe of Romulus, and professed to transfer their homage and loyalty to his august person. Then, as if by way of supplement and addendum, they informed Zeno that they had chosen Flavius Odoacer for their governor, and trusted that their august master would deign to ratify the choice, and confer on Odoacer the title of Patrician...

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Delphi Collected Works of Eusebius (Illustrated) - Eusebius of Caesarea Cover Art

Delphi Collected Works of Eusebius (Illustrated)

Delphi Collected Works of Eusebius (Illustrated) by Eusebius of Caesarea

A scholar of the Biblical canon, Eusebius of Caesarea became counsellor of Constantine the Great and is regarded as an extremely learned Christian of the fourth century. Today his fame chiefly rests as a historian, whose pioneer work ‘Ecclesiastical History’ provides a chronological account of the development of Early Christianity from the first century to the fourth century. Eusebius also wrote an informative ‘Life of Constantine’, famously narrating the emperor’s victory at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge and his dramatic conversion to Christianity. Delphi’s Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and original Greek texts. This comprehensive eBook presents Eusebius’ collected works in English translation, with illustrations, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1) * Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Eusebius’ life and works * Features all of the major works of Eusebius in English translation * Includes the Greek text of Eusbeius’ ‘Historia ecclesiastica’ * Concise introductions to the major works * Rare translations provided by contributors to www.tertullian.org * Excellent formatting of the texts * Easily locate the sections you want to read with individual contents tables * Features a bonus biography — discover Eusebius’ ancient world Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to explore our range of Ancient Classics titles or buy the entire series as a Super Set CONTENTS: The Translations Chronicle (Translated by Andrew Smith) Six Selected Passages from ‘Commentary on the Psalms’ (Translated by Fr. Alban Justinus) Against Hierocles (Translated by F.C. Conybeare, Loeb Classical Library, 1912) The Proof of the Gospel (Translated by W. J. Ferrar, 1920) On the Celebration of Easter (Translated by Andrew Eastbourne) Encomium on the Martyrs (Translated by B. H. Cowper, 1864) The History of the Martyrs in Palestine (Translated by William Cureton, 1861) Ecclesiastical History (Translated by Arthur Cushman McGiffert) Life of Constantine (Translated by Ernest Cushing Richardson, 1890) Letter to Carpianus on the Gospel Canons (Translated by Mark DelCogliano) Concerning the Place Names in Sacred Scripture (Translated by C. Umhau Wolf) The Preparation of the Gospel (Translated by E.H. Gifford, 1903) Theophania (Translated by Samuel Lee, 1843) On the Star (Spurious) (Translated by William Wright, 1866) The Greek Text Historia ecclesiastica The Biography The Life and Writings of Eusebius of Cæsarea by Arthur Cushman McGiffert Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles

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Greek Religion - Walter Burkert & John Raffan Cover Art

Greek Religion

Greek Religion Archaic and Classical by Walter Burkert & John Raffan

" Greek Religion . . . already has the standing of a classic, and the publication of an English version, which incorporates new material and is in effect a second edition, demands a toast . . . Anyone who pretends to survey Greek religion must be phenomenally learned. Burkert is. His book is a marvel of professional scholarship." — London Review of Books "This book has established itself as a masterpiece, packed with learning but also rich in ideas and connections of every sort. Its appearance in a good English translation is an event not only for Hellenists but for all those interested in the study of religion . . . nobody else could have produced an account of the subject of comparable range and power. This will be the best history of Greek religion for this generation." — New York Review of Books Cover illustration: detail from an Attic vase, 450 B.C., showing a victory sacrifice (The Mansell Collection).

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The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Roman Empire - Eric Nelson Cover Art

The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Roman Empire

The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Roman Empire Engrossing Stories of Roman Conquest, Palace Intrigue, and the Politics of Empire by Eric Nelson

You're no idiot, of course. The battle scenes in Gladiator had you on the edge of your seat and wondering where you could find more information on the rise and fall of ancient Rome. But, so far, your search has left you feeling like a blundering barbarian. Pick yourself up off the Colisseum floor! Consult 'The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Roman Empire', a fun-to-read introduction to the fascinating history, people, and culture of Ancient Rome. In this Complete Idiot's Guide, you get: -The history of the Roman Empire's rise and fall. -An idiot-proof introduction to the great epic literature of the Roman Republic. -A survey of the Romans in arts and popular culture. -Fascinating details of some of history's most nefarious emperors, including Nero, Caligula, and Commodus.

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The Egyptian World - Toby Wilkinson Cover Art

The Egyptian World

The Egyptian World by Toby Wilkinson

Authoritative and up-to-date, this key single-volume work is a thematic exploration of ancient Egyptian civilization and culture as it was expressed down the centuries.Including topics rarely covered elsewhere as well as new perspectives, this work comprises thirty-two original chapters written by international experts. Each chapter gives an overvi

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Twelve Caesars - Mary Beard Cover Art

Twelve Caesars

Twelve Caesars Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern by Mary Beard

From the bestselling author of SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome , the fascinating story of how images of Roman autocrats have influenced art, culture, and the representation of power for more than 2,000 years What does the face of power look like? Who gets commemorated in art and why? And how do we react to statues of politicians we deplore? In this book—against a background of today’s “sculpture wars”—Mary Beard tells the story of how for more than two millennia portraits of the rich, powerful, and famous in the western world have been shaped by the image of Roman emperors, especially the “Twelve Caesars,” from the ruthless Julius Caesar to the fly-torturing Domitian. Twelve Caesars asks why these murderous autocrats have loomed so large in art from antiquity and the Renaissance to today, when hapless leaders are still caricatured as Neros fiddling while Rome burns. Beginning with the importance of imperial portraits in Roman politics, this richly illustrated book offers a tour through 2,000 years of art and cultural history, presenting a fresh look at works by artists from Memling and Mantegna to the nineteenth-century American sculptor Edmonia Lewis, as well as by generations of weavers, cabinetmakers, silversmiths, printers, and ceramicists. Rather than a story of a simple repetition of stable, blandly conservative images of imperial men and women, Twelve Caesars is an unexpected tale of changing identities, clueless or deliberate misidentifications, fakes, and often ambivalent representations of authority. From Beard’s reconstruction of Titian’s extraordinary lost Room of the Emperors to her reinterpretation of Henry VIII’s famous Caesarian tapestries, Twelve Caesars includes fascinating detective work and offers a gripping story of some of the most challenging and disturbing portraits of power ever created. Published in association with the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

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The Complete Histories of Polybius - Polybius Cover Art

The Complete Histories of Polybius

The Complete Histories of Polybius by Polybius

Written in the 2nd century by the Greek historian Polybius, "The Histories" is a multi-volume work detailing many of the events, people, and ideas of the Hellenistic Period. While his focus is the space of time in which ancient Rome became a world power from 220 to 167 BC, Polybius also discusses his role as a 'pragmatic historian', a discourse on fate (called tyche), and the superiority of the mixed constitution. Though all forty volumes have not survived to the present day, the complete books extant today cover the affairs of all the important nations of the time, including Egypt, Greece, and Spain, as well as the first and second Punic Wars. Polybius speaks at length on the government of the Romans, citing it as the reason for Rome's success as a force of the world. Though it includes a couple of digressions concerning lesser issues of the time, "The Histories" has proven and continues to be a valuable text when studying the Hellenistic time period and manner of writing.

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Egyptian Magic - E. A. Wallis Budge Cover Art

Egyptian Magic

Egyptian Magic by E. A. Wallis Budge

A study of the remains of the native religious literature of ancient Egypt which have come down to us has revealed the fact that the belief in magic, that is to say, in the power of magical names, and spells, and enchantments, and formulæ, and pictures, and figures, and amulets, and in the performance of ceremonies accompanied by the utterance of words of power, to produce supernatural results.

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Easy Lessons in Egyptian Hieroglyphics - E. A. Wallis Budge Cover Art

Easy Lessons in Egyptian Hieroglyphics

Easy Lessons in Egyptian Hieroglyphics by E. A. Wallis Budge

Written by perhaps the most prolific, erudite Egyptologist of the 20th century, this solid guide to hieroglyphics remains the standard introduction. Budge gives the history of hieroglyphic writing, its evolution into hieratic and demotic scripts, and the fascinating tale of its decipherment by Young, Champollion, Åkerblad, and others.