Top Ancient History Ebooks

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The History of the Byzantine Empire: From Its Glory to Its Downfall - Charles Oman Cover Art

The History of the Byzantine Empire: From Its Glory to Its Downfall by Charles Oman

This carefully crafted ebook: "The History of the Byzantine Empire - From Its Glory to Its Downfall" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. This edition covers the history of the Eastern Roman Empire from late antiquity until the Fall of Constantinople in 1453 AD. The author gives the complete insight into the fascinating empire which was characterized by Roman state traditions, Greek culture and language; and Orthodox Christianity. Among the greatest accomplishments of the Empire, the author emphasizes its contribution to the formation of the medieval Europe, its major role in shaping Orthodoxy and transmission of classical knowledge. Contents: Byzantium The Foundation of Constantinople The Fight With the Goths The Departure of the Germans The Reorganization of the Eastern Empire Justinian Justinian's Foreign Conquests The End of Justinian's Reign The Coming of the Slavs The Darkest Hour Social and Religious Life The Coming of the Saracens The First Anarchy The Saracens Turned Back The Iconoclasts The End of the Iconoclasts The Literary Emperors and Their Time Military Glory The End of the Macedonian Dynasty Manzikert The Comneni and the Crusades The Latin Conquest of Constantinople The Latin Empire and the Empire of Nicaea Decline and Decay The Turks in Europe. The End of a Long Tale Table of Emperors

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Pagans - James J. O'Donnell Cover Art

Pagans

Pagans The End of Traditional Religion and the Rise of Christianity by James J. O'Donnell

A provocative and contrarian religious history that charts the rise of Christianity from the point of view of traditional” religion from the religious scholar and critically acclaimed author of Augustine. Pagans explores the rise of Christianity from a surprising and unique viewpoint: that of the people who witnessed their ways of life destroyed by what seemed then a powerful religious cult. These “pagans” were actually pious Greeks, Romans, Syrians, and Gauls who observed the traditions of their ancestors. To these devout polytheists, Christians who worshipped only one deity were immoral atheists who believed that a splash of water on the deathbed could erase a lifetime of sin. Religious scholar James J. O’Donnell takes us on a lively tour of the Ancient Roman world through the fourth century CE, when Romans of every nationality, social class, and religious preference found their world suddenly constrained by rulers who preferred a strange new god. Some joined this new cult, while others denied its power, erroneously believing it was little more than a passing fad. In Pagans, O’Donnell brings to life various pagan rites and essential features of Roman religion and life, offers fresh portraits of iconic historical figures, including Constantine, Julian, and Augustine, and explores important themes—Rome versus the east, civilization versus barbarism, plurality versus unity, rich versus poor, and tradition versus innovation—in this startling account. 

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Lives of the Twelve Caesars - G. Surtonius Tranquillus Cover Art

Lives of the Twelve Caesars

Lives of the Twelve Caesars Grammarians, Rhetoricians & Poets by G. Surtonius Tranquillus

The Twelve Caesars is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire written by Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus. The work, written in AD 121 during the reign of the emperor Hadrian, was the most popular work of Suetonius, at that time Hadrian's personal secretary, and is the largest among his surviving writings. The Twelve Caesars is considered very significant in antiquity and remains a primary source on Roman history.

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Dying Every Day - James Romm Cover Art

Dying Every Day

Dying Every Day Seneca at the Court of Nero by James Romm

From acclaimed classical historian, author of Ghost on the Throne (“Gripping . . . the narrative verve of a born writer and the erudition of a scholar” —Daniel  Mendelsohn) and editor of The Landmark Arrian:The Campaign of Alexander (“Thrilling” — The New York Times Book Review ), a  high-stakes drama full of murder, madness, tyranny, perversion, with the sweep of history on the grand scale. At the center, the tumultuous life of Seneca, ancient Rome’s preeminent writer and philosopher, beginning with banishment in his fifties and subsequent appointment as tutor to twelve-year-old Nero, future emperor of Rome. Controlling them both, Nero’s mother, Julia Agrippina the Younger, Roman empress, great-granddaughter of the Emperor Augustus, sister of the Emperor Caligula, niece and fourth wife of Emperor Claudius.             James Romm seamlessly weaves together the life and written words, the moral struggles, political intrigue, and bloody vengeance that enmeshed Seneca the Younger in the twisted imperial family and the perverse, paranoid regime of Emperor Nero, despot and madman. Romm writes that Seneca watched over Nero as teacher, moral guide, and surrogate father, and, at seventeen, when Nero abruptly ascended to become emperor of Rome, Seneca, a man never avid for political power became, with Nero, the ruler of the Roman Empire. We see how Seneca was able to control his young student, how, under Seneca’s influence, Nero ruled with intelligence and moderation, banned capital punishment, reduced taxes, gave slaves the right to file complaints against their owners, pardoned prisoners arrested for sedition. But with time, as Nero grew vain and disillusioned, Seneca was unable to hold sway over the emperor, and between Nero’s mother, Agrippina—thought to have poisoned her second husband, and her third, who was her uncle (Claudius), and rumored to have entered into an incestuous relationship with her son—and Nero’s father, described by Suetonius as a murderer and cheat charged with treason, adultery, and incest, how long could the young Nero have been contained?             Dying Every Day is a portrait of Seneca’s moral struggle in the midst of madness and excess. In his treatises, Seneca preached a rigorous ethical creed, exalting heroes who defied danger to do what was right or embrace a noble death. As Nero’s adviser, Seneca was presented with a more complex set of choices, as the only man capable of summoning the better aspect of Nero’s nature, yet, remaining at Nero’s side and colluding in the evil regime he created. Dying Every Day is the first book to tell the compelling and nightmarish story of the philosopher-poet who was almost a king, tied to a tyrant—as Seneca, the paragon of reason, watched his student spiral into madness and whose descent saw five family murders, the Fire of Rome, and a savage purge that destroyed the supreme minds of the Senate’s golden age.

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The Nile - Toby Wilkinson Cover Art

The Nile

The Nile A Journey Downriver Through Egypt's Past and Present by Toby Wilkinson

A hypnotic journey in the company of one of the world's most acclaimed Egyptologists over the fabled river telling how the Nile continually brought life to an ancient civilization now dead and how it sustained its successors, now in tumult. Renowned Egyptologist Toby Wilkinson leads us through space as much as time: from the river's mystical sources (the Blue Nile which rises in Ethiopia, and the White Nile coursing from majestic Lake Victoria); to Thebes, with its Valley of the Kings, Valley of the Queens, and Luxor Temple; the fertile Delta; Giza, home of the Great Pyramid, the sole surviving Wonder of the Ancient World; and finally, to the pulsating capital city of Cairo, where the Arab Spring erupted on the bridges over the Nile. Along the way, he introduces us to mysterious and fabled characters-the gods, godlike pharaohs, emperors and empresses, who joined their fate to the Nile and gained immortality; the adventurers, archaeologists, and historians who have all fallen under its spell. With matchless erudition and storytelling skill, through a lens equal to both panoramas and close-ups, Wilkinson brings millennia of history into view.

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Attila, King of the Huns - William Herbert Cover Art

Attila, King of the Huns

Attila, King of the Huns by William Herbert

If the extraordinary individual, who styled himself not unjustly the scourge of God and terror of the world, had never existed, the history of the Huns would have been very little more interesting to us at the present epoch, than that of the Gepidae, or Alans, or any of the chief nations that were assembled under his banner; but the immensity of the exploits, and the still greater pretensions of that memorable warrior, render it a matter of interest to know the origins of his power, and the very beginnings from which his countrymen had arisen, to threaten the subjugation of the civilized world, and the extirpation of the Christian religion. There has probably existed, before or since the time of Attila, but one other potentate, who, in his brief career, passed like a meteor over Europe, building up an empire, that was maintained by his personal qualities, and crumbled to atoms the moment he was withdrawn from it, leaving, however, consequences of which it is difficult to calculate the extent or termination.  One of the greatest losses that the history of Europe has sustained, is that of the eight books of the life of Attila, written in Greek by Priscus, who was his cotemporary and personally acquainted with him, and who, by the fragments that have been preserved to us, appears to have been most particular, candid, and entertaining, in his details. The loss is the more to be regretted, as it is certain that they did exist entire in the library of the Vatican after the restoration of literature, though it appears to have been ascertained by anxious research, that they are no longer to be found there; and there seems reason to suspect, that they may have been purposely destroyed through the jealousy of the Church of Rome, lest their publication should bring to light any facts or circumstances, that might militate against its policy or doctrines; when we consider the conspicuous part which was acted by the bishop of Rome, at the close of the Italian campaign of Attila, a period not long antecedent to the claim advanced by his successors to religious and political supremacy.  As we are thus deprived of the great fountain of information, our materials relating to the events of some of the most important portions of his life, and especially the particulars of its termination, are lamentably deficient. Under these circumstances it will be necessary to compare the brief and conflicting notices which have descended to us, with the copious and varied details of the most rude and ancient romances of Europe, which, however involved in confusion, and discredited by fiction and anachronism, can scarcely be supposed to have been built upon no foundation. The little we know concerning the origin and early habits of the Huns, is chiefly derived from Chinese writers who were consulted by Des Guignes, which may be compared with the statements of ancient chroniclers, and, as far as relates to the general manners of the Huns and other tribes that emerged from Asia, is most strikingly confirmed by Latin authority...

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Forbidden History - J. Douglas Kenyon Cover Art

Forbidden History

Forbidden History Prehistoric Technologies, Extraterrestrial Intervention, and the Suppressed Origins of Civilization by J. Douglas Kenyon

Challenges the scientific theories on the establishment of civilization and technology • Contains 42 essays by 17 key thinkers in the fields of alternative science and history, including Christopher Dunn, Frank Joseph, Will Hart, Rand Flem-Ath, and Moira Timmes • Edited by Atlantis Rising publisher, J. Douglas Kenyon In Forbidden History writer and editor J. Douglas Kenyon has chosen 42 essays that have appeared in the bimonthly journal Atlantis Rising to provide readers with an overview of the core positions of key thinkers in the field of ancient mysteries and alternative history. The 17 contributors include among others, Rand Flem-Ath, Frank Joseph, Christopher Dunn, and Will Hart, all of whom challenge the scientific establishment to reexamine its underlying premises in understanding ancient civilizations and open up to the possibility of meaningful debate around alternative theories of humanity's true past. Each of the essays builds upon the work of the other contributors. Kenyon has carefully crafted his vision and selected writings in six areas: Darwinism Under Fire, Earth Changes--Sudden or Gradual, Civilization's Greater Antiquity, Ancestors from Space, Ancient High Tech, and The Search for Lost Origins. He explores the most current ideas in the Atlantis debate, the origins of the Pyramids, and many other controversial themes. The book serves as an excellent introduction to hitherto suppressed and alternative accounts of history as contributors raise questions about the origins of civilization and humanity, catastrophism, and ancient technology. The collection also includes several articles that introduce, compare, contrast, and complement the theories of other notable authors in these fields, such as Zecharia Sitchin, Paul LaViolette, John Michell, and John Anthony West.

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The Gallic Wars - Julius Caesar Cover Art

The Gallic Wars

The Gallic Wars by Julius Caesar

Caesar portrayed his invasion of Gaul as being a defensive pre-emptive action, most historians agree that the wars were fought primarily to boost Caesar's political career and to pay off his massive debts. Even so, Gaul was extremely important to Rome, as they had been attacked many times by the Gauls. Conquering Gaul allowed Rome to secure the natural border of the river Rhine. Caesar painstakingly describes his military campaign, and this is it is still the most important historical source on the Gaul campaign. It is also a masterwork of political propaganda, as Caesar was keenly interested in manipulating his readers in Rome as he published this book just as the Roman Civil war began. W. A. Macdevitt's translations brings this land mark historic book alive.

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When Women Ruled the World - Kara Cooney Cover Art

When Women Ruled the World

When Women Ruled the World Six Queens of Egypt by Kara Cooney

This riveting narrative explores the lives of six remarkable female pharaohs, from Hatshepsut to Cleopatra--women who ruled with real power--and shines a piercing light on our own perceptions of women in power today. Female rulers are a rare phenomenon--but thousands of years ago in ancient Egypt, women reigned supreme. Regularly, repeatedly, and with impunity, queens like Hatshepsut, Nefertiti, and Cleopatra controlled the totalitarian state as power-brokers and rulers. But throughout human history, women in positions of power were more often used as political pawns in a male-dominated society. What was so special about ancient Egypt that provided women this kind of access to the highest political office? What was it about these women that allowed them to transcend patriarchal obstacles? What did Egypt gain from its liberal reliance on female leadership, and could today's world learn from its example? Celebrated Egyptologist Kara Cooney delivers a fascinating tale of female power, exploring the reasons why it has seldom been allowed through the ages, and why we should care.

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Killing Jesus - Bill O'Reilly & Martin Dugard Cover Art

Killing Jesus

Killing Jesus A History by Bill O'Reilly & Martin Dugard

Millions of readers have thrilled to bestselling authors Bill O'Reilly and historian Martin Dugard's Killing Kennedy and Killing Lincoln , page-turning works of nonfiction that have changed the way we read history. Now the iconic anchor of The O'Reilly Factor details the events leading up to the murder of the most influential man in history: Jesus of Nazareth. Nearly two thousand years after this beloved and controversial young revolutionary was brutally killed by Roman soldiers, more than 2.2 billion human beings attempt to follow his teachings and believe he is God. Killing Jesus will take readers inside Jesus's life, recounting the seismic political and historical events that made his death inevitable - and changed the world forever.

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Black Genesis - Robert Bauval & Thomas Brophy Cover Art

Black Genesis

Black Genesis The Prehistoric Origins of Ancient Egypt by Robert Bauval & Thomas Brophy

Presents proof that an advanced black African civilization inhabited the Sahara long before Pharaonic Egypt • Reveals black Africa to be at the genesis of ancient civilization and the human story • Examines extensive studies into the lost civilization of the “Star People” by renowned anthropologists, archaeologists, genetic scientists, and cultural historians as well as the authors’ archaeoastronomy and hieroglyphics research • Deciphers the history behind the mysterious Nabta Playa ceremonial area and its stone calendar circle and megaliths Relegated to the realm of archaeological heresy, despite a wealth of hard scientific evidence, the theory that an advanced civilization of black Africans settled in the Sahara long before Pharaonic Egypt existed has been dismissed and even condemned by conventional Egyptologists, archaeologists, and the Egyptian government. Uncovering compelling new evidence, Egyptologist Robert Bauval and astrophysicist Thomas Brophy present the anthropological, climatological, archaeological, geological, and genetic research supporting this hugely debated theory of the black African origin of Egyptian civilization. Building upon extensive studies from the past four decades and their own archaeoastronomical and hieroglyphic research, the authors show how the early black culture known as the Cattle People not only domesticated cattle but also had a sophisticated grasp of astronomy; created plentiful rock art at Gilf Kebir and Gebel Uwainat; had trade routes to the Mediterranean coast, central Africa, and the Sinai; held spiritual and occult ceremonies; and constructed a stone calendar circle and megaliths at the ceremonial site of Nabta Playa reminiscent of Stonehenge, yet much older. Revealing these “Star People” as the true founders of ancient Egyptian civilization, this book completely rewrites the history of world civilization, placing black Africa back in its rightful place at the center of mankind’s origins.

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I, Claudius - Robert Graves Cover Art

I, Claudius

I, Claudius from the autobiography of Tiberius Claudius, born 10 B.C., murdered and deified A.D. 54A by Robert Graves

Once a rather bookish young man with a limp and a stammer, a man who spent most of his time trying to stay away from the danger and risk of the line of ascension, Claudius seemed an unlikely candidate for Emperor. Yet, on the death of Caligula, Claudius finds himself next in line for the throne, and must stay alive as well as keep control. Drawing on the histories of Plutarch, Suetonius, and Gaius Cornelius Tacitus, noted historian and classicist Robert Graves tells the story of the much-maligned Emperor Claudius with both skill and compassion. Weaving important themes throughout about the nature of freedom and safety possible in a safety and a monarchy, Graves’ Claudius is both more effective and more tragic than history typically remembers him. A best-selling novel and one of Graves’ most successful, I, Claudius has been adapted to television, film, theatre, and audio.

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The History of Rome: All Books - Livy & Wyatt North Cover Art

The History of Rome: All Books

The History of Rome: All Books by Livy & Wyatt North

The History of Rome comes complete with a Touch-or-Click Table of Contents, divided by each section. Livy’s History of Rome was in high demand from the first time it was published. Titus Livius, as Livy in English, was a Roman historian who wrote a monumental history of Rome and the Roman people covering the period from the earliest legends of Rome well before the traditional foundation in 753 BC through the reign of Augustus in Livy's own time. He was on familiar terms with the Julio-Claudian family, advising Augustus's grandnephew, the future emperor Claudius, as a young man not long before 14 AD in a letter to take up the writing of history. Livy and Augustus's wife, Livia, were from the same clan in different locations, although not related by blood. Enjoy.

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Babylon - Paul Kriwaczek Cover Art

Babylon

Babylon Mesopotamia and the Birth of Civilization by Paul Kriwaczek

Civilization was born eight thousand years ago, between the floodplains of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, when migrants from the surrounding mountains and deserts began to create increasingly sophisticated urban societies. In the cities that they built, half of human history took place. In Babylon, Paul Kriwaczek tells the story of Mesopotamia from the earliest settlements seven thousand years ago to the eclipse of Babylon in the sixth century BCE. Bringing the people of this land to life in vibrant detail, the author chronicles the rise and fall of power during this period and explores the political and social systems, as well as the technical and cultural innovations, which made this land extraordinary. At the heart of this book is the story of Babylon, which rose to prominence under the Amorite king Hammurabi from about 1800 BCE. Even as Babylon's fortunes waxed and waned, it never lost its allure as the ancient world's greatest city. Engaging and compelling, Babylon reveals the splendor of the ancient world that laid the foundation for civilization itself.

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Primary Accounts of African Civilization - Herodotus, Ezana, Strabo, Dio Cassius & Procopius Cover Art

Primary Accounts of African Civilization

Primary Accounts of African Civilization The Meroe, Kush, and Axum by Herodotus, Ezana, Strabo, Dio Cassius & Procopius

Primary Accounts of African Civilization: The Meroe, Kush, and Axum is a collection of accounts about African civilizations written by some of the oldest and most prominent historians of antiquity, including Herodotus , also known as the “Father of History,” who lived in the 5th century B.C. (c. 484 BC – c. 425 BC) and was the first historian known to collect his materials systematically, test their accuracy to a certain extent and arrange them in a well-constructed and vivid narrative. The collection also includes an account written by Strabo , a Greek historian, geographer and philosopher during the first century B.C. Though he is lesser known than Herodotus, Strabo traveled throughout the Mediterranean and Near East, and around 25 B.C., he sailed up the Nile until reaching Philae.  The authors’ accounts of African civilizations reflect the prominence of these civilizations in trade and power in the ancient world. For example, the Kingdom of Axum was a naval and trading power that ruled much of present day Ethiopia around the 4th century B.C. The kingdom was also arbitrarily identified as Abyssinia, Ethiopia, and India in medieval writings. Around the same time, Meroë was the base of a flourishing kingdom whose wealth was due to a strong industry, and international trade involving India and China. So much metalworking went on in Meroë, through the working of bloomeries and possibly blast furnaces, that it has even been called "the Birmingham of Africa" because of its vast production and trade of iron to the rest of Africa, and other international trade partners. This edition of Primary Accounts of African Civilizations is specially formatted with a Table of Contents. 

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The Rise of Western Christendom - Peter Brown Cover Art

The Rise of Western Christendom

The Rise of Western Christendom Triumph and Diversity, A.D. 200-1000 by Peter Brown

This tenth anniversary revised edition of the authoritative text on Christianity’s first thousand years of history features a new preface, additional color images, and an updated bibliography. The essential general survey of medieval European Christendom, Brown’s vivid prose charts the compelling and tumultuous rise of an institution that came to wield enormous religious and secular power. • Clear and vivid history of Christianity’s rise and its pivotal role in the making of Europe • Written by the celebrated Princeton scholar who originated of the field of study known as ‘late antiquity’ • Includes a fully updated bibliography and index

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Julius Caesar - Patricia Southern Cover Art

Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar A Life by Patricia Southern

Julius Caesar is part historical figure and part legend. He was a complex individual, a brilliant politician, a successful general, an accomplished psychologist. He grew up in a world where political and military careers were inextricably intertwined, and he excelled at both. In his youth he was considered vain and a little foppish, but showed nerves of steel when he defied the Dictator Sulla ñ and survived. Bending to someoneís will was not in Caesarís make-up. He came late to a position of supreme power, and though his policies embraced pragmatic, sensible measures designed to solve the problems that beset the Republic, it was his dictatorial methods rather than his ideas which caused resentment.??Unfortunately, when his assassins killed him, hoping to liberate the state from what they saw as his tyranny, they had formulated no plans for the government of the Roman world. By murdering Caesar, the assassins provoked a prolonged series of civil wars, and the rise of Augustus, the all-powerful first Emperor, who took up where Caesar left off. In this new appraisal of his life, Patricia Southern sheds light on the man behind the legend.

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Libation - Kimani S. K. Nehusi Cover Art

Libation

Libation An Afrikan Ritual of Heritage in the Circle of Life by Kimani S. K. Nehusi

This book concerns the origins, structure, purpose, meaning, and significance of libation, developments and change within the ritual, and its distribution in the Afrikan world. It connects the practice of libation throughout time, connects Afrikans to their social history, and so to themselves, across generations in different spaces and times.

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The Provinces of the Roman Empire (Illustrated Edition) - Theodor Mommsen Cover Art

The Provinces of the Roman Empire (Illustrated Edition)

The Provinces of the Roman Empire (Illustrated Edition) by Theodor Mommsen

This eBook has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. The Provinces of the Roman Empire from Caesar to Diocletian is a description of all Roman regions during the early imperial period, written by Theodor Mommsen. In separate chapters Mommsen describes the different imperial provinces, each as a stand-alone subject, starting from provinces on the northern frontier of Italy, in Spain, Gallia, Germany, and Britain, then moving east to provinces on the Balkans and in the Middle East, and those in Asia and in Africa.

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The Roman, Christian, and Arabic Periods, History of Egypt Vol. 11 - Angelo Solomon Rappoport Cover Art

The Roman, Christian, and Arabic Periods, History of Egypt Vol. 11

The Roman, Christian, and Arabic Periods, History of Egypt Vol. 11 by Angelo Solomon Rappoport

Continuation of Maspero's History of Egypt, Chaldea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria.Volume 11 of that series. Also volume 2 of 3 of History of Egypt from 330 BC to the Present Time. The thirteen-book series includes over 1200 illustrations.This volume covers:Egypt Under the Roman Empire, The Christian Period in Egypt, and Egypt During the Muhammedan Period.Angelo Solomon Rappoport lived 1871-1950.

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Cataclysm 90 BC - Philip Matyszak Cover Art

Cataclysm 90 BC

Cataclysm 90 BC The Forgotten War That Almost Destroyed Rome by Philip Matyszak

We are accustomed to think of the late Republic as a period in which Rome enjoyed almost uninterrupted military success against foreign enemies. Yet at the start of the first century BC, Rome, outnumbered and out-generalled, faced a hostile army less than a week's march from the Capitol. It is probable that only a swift surrender prevented the city from being attacked and sacked. Before that point, three Roman consuls had died in battle, and two Roman armies had been soundly defeated - not in some foreign field, but in the heartland of Italy. 
So who were this enemy who so comprehensively knocked Rome to its knees? What army could successfully challenge the legions which had been undefeated from Spain to the Euphrates? And why is that success almost unknown today?
These questions are answered in this book, a military and political history of the Social War of 90-88BC. This tells the story of the revolt of Rome's Italian allies (socii in Latin - hence the name of the war). Because these Italian allies had the arms, training and military systems of the Roman army which they usually fought alongside, all Rome's usual military advantages were nullified. This brought the war down to a clash of generals, with the Roman rivals Gaius Marius and Cornelius Sulla spending almost as much time in political intrigue as combat with the enemy. The Italian leaders had to manage an equally fractious coalition of peoples. Some tribes sought negotiation with Rome, and others would settle for nothing less than the total extermination of the city and its people.
The interplay of personalities (the young Cicero, Cato, and Pompey were also protagonists); high-stakes politics and full-scale warfare combine with assassination; personal sacrifice and desperate measures (such as raising an army of freed slaves) to make for a taut, fast-paced tale.

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History of Egypt, Chaldea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 9 (Illustrated) - G. Maspero Cover Art

History of Egypt, Chaldea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 9 (Illustrated)

History of Egypt, Chaldea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 9 (Illustrated) by G. Maspero

The thirteen-book series includes over 1200 illustrations.  This volume covers: The Iranian Conquest and The Last Days of the Old Eastern World. According to Wikipedia: "Gaston Camille Charles Maspero (June 23, 1846 ñ June 30, 1916) was a French Egyptologist... Among his best-known publications are the large Histoire ancienne des peuples de l'Orient classique (3 vols., Paris, 1895-1897, translated into English by Mrs McClure for the S.P.C.K.), displaying the history of the whole of the nearer East from the beginnings to the conquest by Alexander..."

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The Storm Before the Storm - Mike Duncan Cover Art

The Storm Before the Storm

The Storm Before the Storm The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic by Mike Duncan

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The creator of the award-winning podcast series The History of Rome and Revolutions brings to life the bloody battles, political machinations, and human drama that set the stage for the fall of the Roman Republic. The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. Beginning as a small city-state in central Italy, Rome gradually expanded into a wider world filled with petty tyrants, barbarian chieftains, and despotic kings. Through the centuries, Rome's model of cooperative and participatory government remained remarkably durable and unmatched in the history of the ancient world. In 146 BC, Rome finally emerged as the strongest power in the Mediterranean. But the very success of the Republic proved to be its undoing. The republican system was unable to cope with the vast empire Rome now ruled: rising economic inequality disrupted traditional ways of life, endemic social and ethnic prejudice led to clashes over citizenship and voting rights, and rampant corruption and ruthless ambition sparked violent political clashes that cracked the once indestructible foundations of the Republic. Chronicling the years 146-78 BC, The Storm Before the Storm dives headlong into the first generation to face this treacherous new political environment. Abandoning the ancient principles of their forbearers, men like Marius, Sulla, and the Gracchi brothers set dangerous new precedents that would start the Republic on the road to destruction and provide a stark warning about what can happen to a civilization that has lost its way.

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Mortal Republic - Edward J. Watts Cover Art

Mortal Republic

Mortal Republic How Rome Fell into Tyranny by Edward J. Watts

A new history of the Roman Republic and its collapse In Mortal Republic , prize-winning historian Edward J. Watts offers a new history of the fall of the Roman Republic that explains why Rome exchanged freedom for autocracy. For centuries, even as Rome grew into the Mediterranean's premier military and political power, its governing institutions, parliamentary rules, and political customs successfully fostered negotiation and compromise. By the 130s BC, however, Rome's leaders increasingly used these same tools to cynically pursue individual gain and obstruct their opponents. As the center decayed and dysfunction grew, arguments between politicians gave way to political violence in the streets. The stage was set for destructive civil wars--and ultimately the imperial reign of Augustus. The death of Rome's Republic was not inevitable. In Mortal Republic , Watts shows it died because it was allowed to, from thousands of small wounds inflicted by Romans who assumed that it would last forever.

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The Emperor's Handbook - Marcus Aurelius Cover Art

The Emperor's Handbook

The Emperor's Handbook by Marcus Aurelius

Written in Greek, without any intention of publication, by the only Roman emperor who was also a philosopher, the THE EMPEROR’S HANDBOOK (or MEDITATIONS) of Marcus Aurelius (AD 121-180) offer a remarkable series of challenging spiritual reflections and exercises developed as the emperor struggled to understand himself and make sense of the universe.  Ranging from doubt and despair to conviction and exaltation, they cover such diverse topics as the nature of moral virtue, human rationality, divine providence, and Marcus’ own emotions.

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SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome - Mary Beard Cover Art

SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome

SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome by Mary Beard

New York Times Bestseller • National Book Critics Circle Finalist • Wall Street Journal Best Books of 2015 • Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2015 • Economist Books of the Year 2015 • New York Times Book Review 100 Notable Books of 2015 A sweeping, "magisterial" history of the Roman Empire from one of our foremost classicists shows why Rome remains "relevant to people many centuries later" (Atlantic). In SPQR, an instant classic, Mary Beard narrates the history of Rome "with passion and without technical jargon" and demonstrates how "a slightly shabby Iron Age village" rose to become the "undisputed hegemon of the Mediterranean" (Wall Street Journal). Hailed by critics as animating "the grand sweep and the intimate details that bring the distant past vividly to life" (Economist) in a way that makes "your hair stand on end" (Christian Science Monitor) and spanning nearly a thousand years of history, this "highly informative, highly readable" (Dallas Morning News) work examines not just how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries. With its nuanced attention to class, democratic struggles, and the lives of entire groups of people omitted from the historical narrative for centuries, SPQR will to shape our view of Roman history for decades to come.

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The Campaigns of Alexander - Arrian & Aubrey De Selincourt Cover Art

The Campaigns of Alexander

The Campaigns of Alexander by Arrian & Aubrey De Selincourt

Although written over four hundred years after Alexander's death, Arrian's account of the man and his achievements is the most reliable we have. Arrian's own experience as a military commander gave him unique insights into the life of the world's greatest conqueror. He tells of Alexander's violent suppression of the Theban rebellion, his defeat of Persia and campaigns through Egypt and Babylon - establishing new cities and destroying others in his path. While Alexander emerges as a charismatic leader, Arrian succeeds brilliantly in creating an objective portrait of a man of boundless ambition, who was exposed to the temptations of power.

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Confronting the Classics: Traditions, Adventures, and Innovations - Mary Beard Cover Art

Confronting the Classics: Traditions, Adventures, and Innovations

Confronting the Classics: Traditions, Adventures, and Innovations by Mary Beard

A National Book Critics Circle Award finalist, this is “the perfect introduction to classical studies, and deserves to become something of a standard work” (Observer). Mary Beard, drawing on thirty years of teaching and writing about Greek and Roman history, provides a panoramic portrait of the classical world, a book in which we encounter not only Cleopatra and Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar and Hannibal, but also the common people—the millions of inhabitants of the Roman Empire, the slaves, soldiers, and women. How did they live? Where did they go if their marriage was in trouble or if they were broke? Or, perhaps just as important, how did they clean their teeth? Effortlessly combining the epic with the quotidian, Beard forces us along the way to reexamine so many of the assumptions we held as gospel—not the least of them the perception that the Emperor Caligula was bonkers or Nero a monster. With capacious wit and verve, Beard demonstrates that, far from being carved in marble, the classical world is still very much alive.

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The Works of Epictetus - Epictetus Cover Art

The Works of Epictetus

The Works of Epictetus His Discourses in Four Books, The Enchiridion, and Fragments by Epictetus

*Includes a Table of Contents Epictetus was a Greek philosopher who lived during the 1st and 2nd centuries A.D (55 – 135). Interestingly, Epictetus did not actually write anything; all texts by Epictetus were written by his student Arrian.  Included in this collection are The Discourses , The Enchiridion , and fragments attributed to Epictetus.  A table of contents is included for easier navigation.

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Alexandria - Theodore Vrettos Cover Art

Alexandria

Alexandria City of the Western Mind by Theodore Vrettos

Alexandria was the greatest cultural capital of the ancient world. Accomplished classicist and author Theodore Vrettos now tells its story for the first time in a single volume. His enchanting blend of literary and scholarly qualities makes stories that played out among architectural wonders of the ancient world come alive. His fascinating central contention that this amazing metropolis created the western mind can now take its place in cultural history. Vrettos describes how and why the brilliant minds of the ages -- Greek scholars, Roman emperors, Jewish leaders, and fathers of the Christian Church -- all traveled to the shining port city Alexander the Great founded in 332 B.C. at the mouth of the mighty Nile. There they enjoyed learning from an extraordinary population of peaceful citizens whose rich intellectual life would quietly build the science, art, faith, and even politics of western civilization. No one has previously argued that, unlike the renowned military centers of the Mediterranean such as Rome, Carthage, and Sparta, Alexandria was a city of the mind. In a brief section on the great conqueror and founder Alexander, we learn that he himself was a student of Aristotle. In Part Two of his majestic story, Vrettos shows that in the sciences the city witnessed an explosion: Aristarchus virtually invented modern astronomy; Euclid wrote the elements of geometry and founded mathematics; amazingly, Eratosthenes precisely figured the circumference of the earth; and 2,500 years before Freud, the renowned Alexandrian physician Erasistratus identified a mysterious connection between sexual problems and nervous breakdowns. What could so cerebral a community care about geopolitics? As Vrettos explains in the third part of this epic saga, if Rome wanted power and prestige in the Mediterranean, the emperors had to secure the good will of the ruling class in Alexandria. Julius Caesar brought down the Roman Republic, and then almost immediately had to go to Alexandria to secure his power base. So begins a wonderfully told story of political intrigue that doesn't end until the Battle of Actium in 33 B.C. when Augustus Caesar defeated the first power couple, Anthony and Cleopatra. The fourth part of Alexandria focuses on the sphere of religion, and for Vrettos its center is the famous Alexandrian Library. The chief librarian commissioned the Septuagint, the oldest Greek version of the Old Testament, which was completed by Jewish intellectuals. Local church fathers Clement and Origen were key players in the development of Christianity; and the Coptic religion, with its emphasis on personal knowledge of God, flourished. Vrettos has blended compelling stories with astute historical insight. Having read all the ancient sources in Ancient Greek, Hebrew, and Latin himself, he has an expert's knowledge of the everyday reality of his characters and setting. No reader will ever forget walking with him down this lost city's beautiful, dazzling streets.

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The Spartan Regime - Paul Anthony Rahe Cover Art

The Spartan Regime

The Spartan Regime by Paul Anthony Rahe

An authoritative and refreshingly original consideration of the government and culture of ancient Sparta and her place in Greek history For centuries, ancient Sparta has been glorified in song, fiction, and popular art. Yet the true nature of a civilization described as a combination of democracy and oligarchy by Aristotle, considered an ideal of liberty in the ages of Machiavelli and Rousseau, and viewed as a forerunner of the modern totalitarian state by many twentieth-century scholars has long remained a mystery. In a bold new approach to historical study, noted historian Paul Rahe attempts to unravel the Spartan riddle by deploying the regime-oriented political science of the ancient Greeks, pioneered by Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, Xenophon, and Polybius, in order to provide a more coherent picture of government, art, culture, and daily life in Lacedaemon than has previously appeared in print, and to explore the grand strategy the Spartans devised before the arrival of the Persians in the Aegean.

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24 Hours in Ancient Egypt - Donald P. Ryan Cover Art

24 Hours in Ancient Egypt

24 Hours in Ancient Egypt A Day in the Life of the People Who Lived There by Donald P. Ryan

Spend 24 hours with the ancient Egyptians. Ancient Egypt wasn’t all pyramids, sphinxes and gold sarcophagi. For your average Egyptian, life was tough, and work was hard, conducted under the burning gaze of the sun god Ra. During the course of a day in the ancient city of Thebes (modern-day Luxor), Egypt’s religious capital, we meet 24 Egyptians from all strata of society – from the king to the bread-maker, the priestess to the fisherman, the soldier to the midwife – and get to know what the real Egypt was like by spending an hour in their company. We encounter a different one of these characters every hour and in every chapter, and through their eyes see what an average day in ancient Egypt was really like.

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Gods and Robots - Adrienne Mayor Cover Art

Gods and Robots

Gods and Robots Myths, Machines, and Ancient Dreams of Technology by Adrienne Mayor

The fascinating untold story of how the ancients imagined robots and other forms of artificial life—and even invented real automated machines The first robot to walk the earth was a bronze giant called Talos. This wondrous machine was created not by MIT Robotics Lab, but by Hephaestus, the Greek god of invention. More than 2,500 years ago, long before medieval automata, and centuries before technology made self-moving devices possible, Greek mythology was exploring ideas about creating artificial life—and grappling with still-unresolved ethical concerns about biotechne , “life through craft.” In this compelling, richly illustrated book, Adrienne Mayor tells the fascinating story of how ancient Greek, Roman, Indian, and Chinese myths envisioned artificial life, automata, self-moving devices, and human enhancements—and how these visions relate to and reflect the ancient invention of real animated machines. As early as Homer, Greeks were imagining robotic servants, animated statues, and even ancient versions of Artificial Intelligence, while in Indian legend, Buddha’s precious relics were defended by robot warriors copied from Greco-Roman designs for real automata. Mythic automata appear in tales about Jason and the Argonauts, Medea, Daedalus, Prometheus, and Pandora, and many of these machines are described as being built with the same materials and methods that human artisans used to make tools and statues. And, indeed, many sophisticated animated devices were actually built in antiquity, reaching a climax with the creation of a host of automata in the ancient city of learning, Alexandria, the original Silicon Valley. A groundbreaking account of the earliest expressions of the timeless impulse to create artificial life, Gods and Robots reveals how some of today’s most advanced innovations in robotics and AI were foreshadowed in ancient myth—and how science has always been driven by imagination. This is mythology for the age of AI.

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Inside the Egyptian Museum with Zahi Hawass - Zahi Hawass & Sandro Vannini Cover Art

Inside the Egyptian Museum with Zahi Hawass

Inside the Egyptian Museum with Zahi Hawass Part I Ground Floor - From the Predynastic Period to the Middle Kingdom by Zahi Hawass & Sandro Vannini

“The Egyptian Museum in Cairo is one of the most important museums ever built and contains the world’s largest collection of Pharaonic artefacts. Every Friday, when I go to Tahrir Square to sit in a café, I always make sure that I visit the museum for at least half an hour to see my favourite pieces. Now you can join me.” Zahi Hawass In Inside the Egyptian Museum with Zahi Hawass , the world-renowned archaeologist takes the reader on a marvellous journey through the museum’s stunning treasures, introducing his favourite objects on display and those that he considers essential to understand the ancient Egyptian civilisation. This new four part e-book series builds on the printed version published in 2009 but surpasses it by far. New sections and search tools, magnificently presented objects including maps and locations, and dozens more amazing photographs by Sandro Vannini vastly improve the reading experience and take it to a higher level. In this first part, Zahi Hawass covers the Ground Floor collections of the museum from the Predynastic Period to the Middle Kingdom. “This book is a tribute to the beautiful Egyptian Museum and a token of my love for this magical place. Despite having had some tough times recently, its fascination and beauty are intact and it is a pleasure for me to talk about my favourite objects on display. I hope that you will find the reading enjoyable.”

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The Annals - Tacitus Cover Art

The Annals

The Annals by Tacitus

Most likely born in the south of modern France on the Mediterranean, Tacitus is one of the most famous Roman historians. Tacitus is best known for The Annals and Histories , covering the history of Ancient Rome in very minute detail, and he also wrote Germania , a fascinating description of the Germanic people as seen from the Roman point of view circa 100 A.D. The Annals is a history of the reigns of the four Roman Emperors succeeding Caesar Augustus. The surviving parts of the Annals extensively cover most of the reigns of Tiberius and Nero. The title Annals was probably not given by Tacitus, but derives from the fact that he treated this history in a year-by-year form. The original title was most likely Ab excessu divi Augusti , "Following the death of the divine Augustus." Parts of several books in The Annals have been lost, as have all of Books VII-X, and it seems the end of The Annals in Book XVI was also lost. The Annals is also important to Christians as it confirms some of what is recorded in the Canonical gospels, although such confirmation has been challenged on the basis of its historicity in modern times. This edition of The Annals is specially formatted with a Table of Contents and images of Tacitus, the emperors he covered, and Ancient Rome. 

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The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume III - Edward Gibbon & Gian Battista Piranesi Cover Art

The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume III

The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume III A.D. 1185 to the Fall of Constantinople in 1453 by Edward Gibbon & Gian Battista Piranesi

"I set out upon Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire [and] was immediately dominated by both the story and the style," recalled Winston Churchill. "I devoured Gibbon. I rode triumphantly through it from end to end and enjoyed it all....I was not even estranged by his naughty footnotes." In the two centuries since its completion, Gibbon's magnum opus--which encompasses some thirteen hundred years as it swings across Europe, North Africa, and Asia--has refused to go the way of many "classics" and grow musty on the shelves. "Gibbon is a landmark and a signpost--a landmark of human achievement: and a signpost because the social convulsions of the Roman Empire as described by him sometimes prefigure and indicate convulsions which shake the whole world today," wrote E.M. Forster. Never far below the surface of the magnificent narrative lies the author's wit and sweeping irony, exemplified by Gibbon's famous definition of history as "little more than the register of the crimes, follies and misfortunes of mankind." The third volume contains chapters forty-nine through seventy-one of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire .

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Germania - Tacitus Cover Art

Germania

Germania by Tacitus

Publius Cornelius Tacitus (56 -117 A.D.) was a Roman senator and also one of Romes greatest historians.Tacitus best known works are The Annals and Histories which examined the rule of the emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero and others.Tacitus writing is well known for its insights into the psychology of the politics of his day.

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America Before - Graham Hancock Cover Art

America Before

America Before The Key to Earth's Lost Civilization by Graham Hancock

Was an advanced civilization lost to history in the global cataclysm that ended the last Ice Age? Graham Hancock, the internationally bestselling author, has made it his life's work to find out--and in America Before , he draws on the latest archaeological and DNA evidence to bring his quest to a stunning conclusion. We’ve been taught that North and South America were empty of humans until around 13,000 years ago – amongst the last great landmasses on earth to have been settled by our ancestors. But new discoveries have radically reshaped this long-established picture and we know now that the Americas were first peopled more than 130,000 years ago – many tens of thousands of years before human settlements became established elsewhere. Hancock's research takes us on a series of journeys and encounters with the scientists responsible for the recent extraordinary breakthroughs. In the process, from the Mississippi Valley to the Amazon rainforest, he reveals that ancient "New World" cultures share a legacy of advanced scientific knowledge and sophisticated spiritual beliefs with supposedly unconnected "Old World" cultures. Have archaeologists focused for too long only on the "Old World" in their search for the origins of civilization while failing to consider the revolutionary possibility that those origins might in fact be found in the "New World"? America Before: The Key to Earth's Lost Civilization is the culmination of everything that millions of readers have loved in Hancock's body of work over the past decades, namely a mind-dilating exploration of the mysteries of the past, amazing archaeological discoveries and profound implications for how we lead our lives today.

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Mythology - Edith Hamilton & Jim Tierney Cover Art

Mythology

Mythology Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes, 75th Anniversary Illustrated Edition by Edith Hamilton & Jim Tierney

In celebration of of the 75th anniversary of this classic bestseller, this stunningly illustrated, beautifully packaged, larger-format hardcover edition will be beloved by fans of Greek, Roman, and Norse mythology of all ages. Since its original publication by Little, Brown and Company in 1942, Edith Hamilton's Mythology has sold millions of copies throughout the word and established itself as a perennial bestseller in its various available formats: hardcover, trade paperback, mass market paperback, and e-book. For 75 years readers have chosen this book above all others to discover the thrilling, enchanting, and fascinating world of Western mythology-from Odysseus's adventure-filled journey to the Norse god Odin's effort to postpone the final day of doom. This exciting new deluxe, large-format hardcover edition, published in celebration of the book's 75th anniversary, will be beautifully packages and fully-illustrated throughout with all-new, specially commissioned four-color art, making it a true collector's item.

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1177 B.C. - Eric H. Cline Cover Art

1177 B.C.

1177 B.C. The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric H. Cline

In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages," Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age—and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.

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Delphi Complete Works of Josephus - Josephus Cover Art

Delphi Complete Works of Josephus

Delphi Complete Works of Josephus by Josephus

Born in Jerusalem, Josephus was a man of high descent, who became learned in Jewish law and Greek literature. After defecting to Rome, he was granted citizenship and became an advisor to the Emperor Titus, serving as translator during the Siege of Jerusalem. Josephus’ works provide valuable insight into first century Judaism and the background of Early Christianity. Delphi’s Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Greek texts. This comprehensive eBook presents Josephus’ complete works, with beautiful illustrations, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1) * Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Josephus’ life and works * Features the complete extant works of Josephus, in both English translation and the original Greek * Concise introductions to the historical books and other works * Includes William Whiston’s celebrated translations * Excellent formatting of the texts * Easily locate the works and sections you want to read with individual contents tables * Provides a special dual English and Greek text, allowing readers to compare the sections paragraph by paragraph – ideal for students * Features a bonus biography – discover Josephus’ ancient world * Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles CONTENTS: The Translations WAR OF THE JEWS ANTIQUITIES OF THE JEWS AGAINST APIO LIFE OF FLAVIUS JOSEPHUS DISCOURSE TO THE GREEKS CONCERNING HADES The Greek Texts LIST OF GREEK TEXTS The Dual Texts DUAL GREEK AND ENGLISH TEXTS The Biography JOSEPHUS by Norman Bentwich Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles

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The Gallic War - Julius Caesar & Carolyn Hammond Cover Art

The Gallic War

The Gallic War Seven Commentaries on The Gallic War with an Eighth Commentary by Aulus Hirtius by Julius Caesar & Carolyn Hammond

The Gallic War, published on the eve of the civil war which led to the end of the Roman Republic, is an autobiographical account written by one of the most famous figures of European history. This new translation reflects the purity of Caesar's Latin while preserving the pace and flow of his momentous narrative. As well as an introduction and notes, this edition offers maps, a table of dates, and a glossary.

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Rubicon - Tom Holland Cover Art

Rubicon

Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman Republic by Tom Holland

A vivid historical account of the social world of Rome as it moved from republic to empire. In 49 B.C., the seven hundred fifth year since the founding of Rome, Julius Caesar crossed a small border river called the Rubicon and plunged Rome into cataclysmic civil war. Tom Holland’s enthralling account tells the story of Caesar’s generation, witness to the twilight of the Republic and its bloody transformation into an empire. From Cicero, Spartacus, and Brutus, to Cleopatra, Virgil, and Augustus, here are some of the most legendary figures in history brought thrillingly to life. Combining verve and freshness with scrupulous scholarship, Rubicon is not only an engrossing history of this pivotal era but a uniquely resonant portrait of a great civilization in all its extremes of self-sacrifice and rivalry, decadence and catastrophe, intrigue, war, and world-shaking ambition.

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Sir Gawain and the Green Knight - Anonymous Cover Art

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight by Anonymous

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a late 14th-century Middle English alliterative romance outlining an adventure of Sir Gawain, a knight of King Arthur's Round Table. In the poem, Sir Gawain accepts a challenge from a mysterious warrior who is completely green, from his clothes and hair to his beard and skin, save for his red eyes. The "Green Knight" offers to allow anyone to strike him with his axe if the challenger will take a return blow in a year and a day. Gawain accepts, and beheads him in one blow, only to have the Green Knight stand up, pick up his head, and remind Gawain to meet him at the appointed time. In his struggles to uphold his oath, Gawain faithfully demonstrates the qualities of chivalry and loyalty until his honor is called into question by a test crafted by the lady of the castle in which much of the story takes place. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is one of the better-known Arthurian stories, which date back to the 12th century. This edition is specially formatted for e-readers and includes pictures.

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The Lost Gospel: Decoding the Ancient Text that Reveals Jesus' Marriage to Mary the Magdalene - Simcha Jacobovici & Barrie Wilson Cover Art

The Lost Gospel: Decoding the Ancient Text that Reveals Jesus' Marriage to Mary the Magdalene

The Lost Gospel: Decoding the Ancient Text that Reveals Jesus' Marriage to Mary the Magdalene by Simcha Jacobovici & Barrie Wilson

An international news story when published last year, now in paperback: A historical detective story leads to dramatic and ground-breaking revelations about the life and times of Jesus. Waiting to be rediscovered in the British Library is an ancient manuscript of the early Church, copied by an anonymous monk. The manuscript is at least 1,450 years old, possibly dating to the first century. And now, The Lost Gospel provides the first ever translation from Syriac into English of this unique document that tells the inside story of Jesus’ social, family, and political life. The Lost Gospel takes the reader on an unparalleled historical adventure through a paradigm shifting manuscript. What the authors eventually discover is as astounding as it is surprising: the confirmation of Jesus’ marriage to Mary Magdalene; the names of their two children; the towering presence of Mary Magdalene; a previously unknown plot on Jesus’ life (thirteen years prior to the crucifixion); an assassination attempt against Mary Magdalene and their children; Jesus’ connection to political figures at the highest level of the Roman Empire; and a religious movement that antedates that of Paul—the Church of Mary Magdalene. Part historical detective story, part modern adventure, The Lost Gospel reveals secrets that have been hiding in plain sight for millennia.

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History of the Peloponnesian War - Thucydides & Rex Warner Cover Art

History of the Peloponnesian War

History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides & Rex Warner

Written four hundred years before the birth of Christ, this detailed contemporary account of the long life-and-death struggle between Athens and Sparta stands an excellent chance of fulfilling its author's ambitious claim. Thucydides himself (c.460-400 BC) was an Athenian and achieved the rank of general in the earlier stages of the war. He applied thereafter a passion for accuracy and a contempt for myth and romance in compiling this factual record of a disastrous conflict.

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Herodotus - The Histories - Herodotus Cover Art

Herodotus - The Histories

Herodotus - The Histories Volumes I and II - Complete by Herodotus

Both volumes of Herodotus Histories are presented in this unified edition, which contains all nine books in the well-regarded translation by scholar of antiquity G. C. Maccauley. Volume One The first volume opens with the established history of Greek myth, from the Trojan War onward. Rulers such as King Croesus and Cyrus II of Persia hold a heavy presence in the first passages of the text, together with the various wars and conflicts of the era.   Later, Herodotus travels to Egypt and explains the geography, the vital nature of the Nile river, and the systems of ruling and government present in that nation. Herodotus also discusses distant lands such as India and China, and their customs and trading practices.   Volume Two In contrast to the initial books, the later portions of Herodotus' Histories contain more detail on the aristocracies and rulers of each nation. Military matters at land and sea are discussed, with supreme commanders such as Alexander I of Macedon and Xerxes of Greece receiving scrutiny as to their strategic planning and behaviors.   Together with portions deemed factual and accurate are juxtapositions of Greek mythology upon the text. The famous passage concerning the rescue of the Delphic Oracle from an invading Persian army by supernatural forces is one example of myth in an otherwise historically reliable work.   Over his lifetime, Herodotus personally traveled around most of the ancient world. His expeditions to Egypt and Persia yielded discoveries significant to history, whereby local sources and libraries were consulted to better the comprehensive accuracy of his writings.  As well as his sources, Herodotus would personally observe the differing customs and behaviors of the peoples he walked among. Many of the culturally ingrained practices were considered strange, with Middle Eastern and North African traditions contrasting markedly with those of Greece and Europe.   Although much of what Herodotus wrote has been superseded by the discoveries and historic researches of later epochs, his work remains widely consulted by scholars and historians to this day. Generally praised by historians, Herodotus has since the Roman era held the title "The Father of History".

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Sacred Symbols of the Dogon - Laird Scranton & John Anthony West Cover Art

Sacred Symbols of the Dogon

Sacred Symbols of the Dogon The Key to Advanced Science in the Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphs by Laird Scranton & John Anthony West

Dogon cosmology provides a new Rosetta stone for reinterpreting Egyptian hieroglyphs • Provides a new understanding of Egyptian hieroglyphs as scientific symbols based on Dogon cosmological drawings • Use parallels between Dogon and Egyptian word meanings to identify relationships between Dogon myths and modern science In The Science of the Dogon , Laird Scranton demonstrated that the cosmological structure described in the myths and drawings of the Dogon runs parallel to modern science--atomic theory, quantum theory, and string theory--their drawings often taking the same form as accurate scientific diagrams that relate to the formation of matter. Scranton also pointed to the close resemblance between the keywords and component elements of Dogon cosmology and those of ancient Egypt, and the implication that ancient cosmology may also be about actual science. Sacred Symbols of the Dogon uses these parallels as the starting point for a new interpretation of the Egyptian hieroglyphic language. By substituting Dogon cosmological drawings for equivalent glyph-shapes in Egyptian words, a new way of reading and interpreting the Egyptian hieroglyphs emerges. Scranton shows how each hieroglyph constitutes an entire concept, and that their meanings are scientific in nature. Using the Dogon symbols as a “Rosetta stone,” he reveals references within the ancient Egyptian language that define the full range of scientific components of matter: from massless waves to the completed atom, even suggesting direct correlations to a fully realized unified field theory.

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King Jesus - Ralph Ellis Cover Art

King Jesus

King Jesus King of Judaea, Prince of Rome by Ralph Ellis

Ralph starts by confirming and proving that the New Testament Saul (St Paul) was actually the historian Josephus Flavius. This may sound inconsequential, but this connection brings with it many new descriptions of the biblical family and the Jesus movement. In reality, and contrary to popular perceptions and propaganda, King Jesus and Queen Mary Magdalene were the richest couple in Syrio-Judaea. The Romans wanted to impose taxes on Jesus and Mary, an imposition that provoked the Jewish Revolt. King Jesus fought and lost that war, and so he was crucified, reprieved and sent into exile in Roman England. In those remote lands, King Jesus became known as Atur-tii  (the Egyptian) or ‘King Arthur and the twelve disciples of the Last Supper Table’. All evidence is taken from original texts, including the Tanakh, Talmud, Josephus, Eusebius, Origen, Irenaeus, Cassius, Tacitus, Suetonius, Clement and many others besides. King Jesus Trilogy - part 2. Sequel to: "Cleopatra to Christ".  Followed by: "Jesus, King of Edessa". v9.9

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The History of Alexander - Quintus Curtius Rufus & John Yardley Cover Art

The History of Alexander

The History of Alexander by Quintus Curtius Rufus & John Yardley

Alexander the Great (356-323 BC), who led the Macedonian army to victory in Egypt, Syria, Persia and India, was perhaps the most successful conqueror the world has ever seen. Yet although no other individual has attracted so much speculation across the centuries, Alexander himself remains an enigma. Curtius' History offers a great deal of information unobtainable from other sources of the time. A compelling narrative of a turbulent era, the work recounts events on a heroic scale, detailing court intrigue, stirring speeches and brutal battles - among them, those of Macedonia's great war with Persia, which was to culminate in Alexander's final triumph over King Darius and the defeat of an ancient and mighty empire. It also provides by far the most plausible and haunting portrait of Alexander we possess: a brilliantly realized image of a man ruined by constant good fortune in his youth.

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