Top World History Ebooks

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A Short History of Nearly Everything: Special Illustrated Edition - Bill Bryson Cover Art

A Short History of Nearly Everything: Special Illustrated Edition by Bill Bryson

This new edition of the acclaimed bestseller is lavishly illustrated to convey, in pictures as in words, Bill Bryson’s exciting, informative journey into the world of science. In A Short History of Nearly Everything , the bestselling author of A Walk in the Woods and The Body,  confronts his greatest challenge yet: to understand—and, if possible, answer—the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as his territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us . The result is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it. Now, in this handsome new edition, Bill Bryson’s words are supplemented by full-color artwork that explains in visual terms the concepts and wonder of science, at the same time giving face to the major players in the world of scientific study. Eloquently and entertainingly described, as well as richly illustrated, science has never been more involving or entertaining.

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Sapiens. De animales a dioses - Yuval Noah Harari Cover Art

Sapiens. De animales a dioses

Sapiens. De animales a dioses Una breve historia de la humanidad by Yuval Noah Harari

El libro de no ficción del año. Bestseller internacional con más de diez millones de ejemplares vendidos. Número 1 en la lista de The New York Times. Recomendado por Barack Obama, Bill Gates y Mark Zuckerberg. De la mano de uno de los historiadores más interesantes de la actualidad, he aquí la fascinante interpretación de Yuval Noah Harari sobre la historia de la humanidad. Bestseller nacional e internacional, este libro explora las formas en que la biología y la historia nos han definido y han mejorado nuestra comprensión de lo que significa ser «humano». Hace 70.000 años al menos seis especies de humanos habitaban la Tierra. Hoy solo queda una, la nuestra: Homo Sapiens. ¿Cómo logró nuestra especie imponerse en la lucha por la existencia? ¿Por qué nuestros ancestros recolectores se unieron para crear ciudades y reinos? ¿Cómo llegamos a creer en dioses, en naciones o en los derechos humanos; a confiar en el dinero, en los libros o en las leyes? ¿Cómo acabamos sometidos a la burocracia, a los horarios y al consumismo? ¿Y cómo será el mundo en los milenios venideros? En Sapiens , Yuval Noah Harari traza una breve historia de la humanidad, desde los primeros humanos que caminaron sobre la Tierra hasta los radicales y a veces devastadores avances de las tres grandes revoluciones que nuestra especie ha protagonizado: la cognitiva, la agrícola y la científica. A partir de hallazgos de disciplinas tan diversas como la biología, la antropología o la economía, Harari explora cómo las grandes corrientes de la historia han modelado nuestra sociedad, los animales y las plantas que nos rodean e incluso nuestras personalidades. ¿Hemos ganado en felicidad a medida que ha avanzado la historia? ¿Seremos capaces de liberar alguna vez nuestra conducta de la herencia del pasado? ¿Podemos hacer algo para influir en los siglos futuros? Audaz, ambicioso y provocador , este libro cuestiona todo lo que creíamos saber sobre el ser humano: nuestros orígenes, nuestras ideas, nuestras acciones, nuestro poder... y nuestro futuro. Reseñas: «El libro definitivo para entender quiénes somos. Provocador, lúcido, aporta un original enfoque sobre la esencia del ser humano.» Julia Navarro «Interesante y provocador. Este libro nos da cierta perspectiva del poco tiempo que llevamos en la Tierra, de la corta vida de la ciencia y la agricultura, y de por qué no debemos dar nada por sentado.» Barack Obama «Recomendaría este libro a cualquier persona interesada en una historia de la humanidad a la vez entretenida y desafiante [...] No se puede dejar de leer.» Bill Gates «Aborda las cuestiones más importantes de la historia y del mundo moderno y, además, está escrito con un estilo vívido e inolvidable.» Jared Diamond, premio Pulitzer y autor de Armas, gérmenes y acero «Un libro que invita a la reflexión.» Mark Zuckerberg «Un repaso absorbente de la peripecia humana, escrito con rigor e irreverencia ilustrada.» Antonio Muñoz Molina, El País «Un libro fascinante, como nuestra especie. Nos ayudará a saber de dónde venimos para decidir hacia dónde vamos. Recomiendo Sapiens casi antes que saludar. ¡Disfrútenlo!» Leonor Watling «Monumental, brillante, provocadora.» Pablo Jáuregui, El Mundo «Cuenta la historia del ser humano desde su origen hasta que se convirtió en el rey de la creación.» Iñaki Gabilondo «Me fascina la forma de pensar de este tipo.» Risto Mejide

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Humankind - Rutger Bregman, Erica Moore & Elizabeth Manton Cover Art

Humankind

Humankind A Hopeful History by Rutger Bregman, Erica Moore & Elizabeth Manton

AN INSTANT  NEW YORK TIMES  BESTSELLER The “lively” ( The New Yorker) , “convincing” ( Forbes ), and “riveting pick-me-up we all need right now” ( People ) that proves humanity thrives in a crisis and that our innate kindness and cooperation have been the greatest factors in our long-term success as a species. If there is one belief that has united the left and the right, psychologists and philosophers, ancient thinkers and modern ones, it is the tacit assumption that humans are bad. It's a notion that drives newspaper headlines and guides the laws that shape our lives. From Machiavelli to Hobbes, Freud to Pinker, the roots of this belief have sunk deep into Western thought. Human beings, we're taught, are by nature selfish and governed primarily by self-interest. But what if it isn't true? International bestseller Rutger Bregman provides new perspective on the past 200,000 years of human history, setting out to prove that we are hardwired for kindness, geared toward cooperation rather than competition, and more inclined to trust rather than distrust one another. In fact this instinct has a firm evolutionary basis going back to the beginning of Homo sapiens .  From the real-life Lord of the Flies to the solidarity in the aftermath of the Blitz, the hidden flaws in the Stanford prison experiment to the true story of twin brothers on opposite sides who helped Mandela end apartheid, Bregman shows us that believing in human generosity and collaboration isn't merely optimistic—it's realistic. Moreover, it has huge implications for how society functions. When we think the worst of people, it brings out the worst in our politics and economics. But if we believe in the reality of humanity's kindness and altruism, it will form the foundation for achieving true change in society, a case that Bregman makes convincingly with his signature wit, refreshing frankness, and memorable storytelling. "The Sapiens of 2020." — The Guardian " Humankind made me see humanity from a fresh perspective." —Yuval Noah Harari, author of the #1 bestseller Sapiens Longlisted for the 2021 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction One of the  Washington Post 's 50 Notable Nonfiction Works in 2020  

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On This Day in History - Graeme Donald Cover Art

On This Day in History

On This Day in History by Graeme Donald

The abandoned Mary Celeste is mysteriously found drifting in the mid-Atlantic; Mozart is buried in an unmarked communal grave; and Prohibition in America is brought to an end. Although separated by centuries, these events all share the same anniversary: 5 December. On This Day in History looks back at all 365 days of the year and provides short, riveting entries on the most significant events in history that occurred on that day. One single day could see Alexander the Great cozying up to Winston Churchill and Fidel Castro, or Cleopatra could find herself sharing a page with Abraham Lincoln and Mahatma Gandhi.  This book traverses continents and timelines to give its own unique perspective on these historical events. A wide variety of familiar and lesser-known events are represented, providing fascinating facts that are guaranteed both to educate and entertain any history enthusiast.

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Unveiled Mysteries - Godfré Ray King Cover Art

Unveiled Mysteries

Unveiled Mysteries Ancient Secrets are Revealed by Godfré Ray King

Unveiled Mysteries describes an encounter with St. Germain (see also The Comte de Saint Germain), here described as an Ascended Master, virtually a God, and able to manipulate the fabric of reality. Ballard describes a series of astral trips in time and space with St. Germain, to lost civilizations in South America and the Sahara, as well as well-stocked bunkers of the ancients in the Grand Tetons, Yellowstone, and Mount Shasta. Ballard and St. Germain revisit past lives as citizens of Atlantis and Mu, and they turn out to be relatives. A final chapter mentions encounters with entities from Venus, a theme of later UFO cargo-cults of the 1950s. Connoisseurs of this genre will appreciate Unveiled Mysteries.

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Too Hot to Handle - Jonathan Zimmerman Cover Art

Too Hot to Handle

Too Hot to Handle A Global History of Sex Education by Jonathan Zimmerman

The first comprehensive history of sex education around the world Too Hot to Handle is the first truly international history of sex education. As Jonathan Zimmerman shows, the controversial subject began in the West and spread steadily around the world over the past century. As people crossed borders, however, they joined hands to block sex education from most of their classrooms. Examining key players who supported and opposed the sex education movement, Zimmerman takes a close look at one of the most debated and divisive hallmarks of modern schooling. In the early 1900s, the United States pioneered sex education to protect citizens from venereal disease. But the American approach came under fire after World War II from European countries, which valued individual rights and pleasures over social goals and outcomes. In the so-called Third World, sex education developed in response to the deadly crisis of HIV/AIDS. By the early 2000s, nearly every country in the world addressed sex in its official school curriculum. Still, Zimmerman demonstrates that sex education never won a sustained foothold: parents and religious leaders rejected the subject as an intrusion on their authority, while teachers and principals worried that it would undermine their own tenuous powers. Despite the overall liberalization of sexual attitudes, opposition to sex education increased as the century unfolded. Into the present, it remains a subject without a home. Too Hot to Handle presents the stormy development and dilemmas of school-based sex education in the modern world.

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Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind - Dr. Yuval Noah Harari Cover Art

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Dr. Yuval Noah Harari

New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.

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Seven Games: A Human History - Oliver Roeder Cover Art

Seven Games: A Human History

Seven Games: A Human History by Oliver Roeder

A group biography of seven enduring and beloved games, and the story of why—and how—we play them. Checkers, backgammon, chess, and Go. Poker, Scrabble, and bridge. These seven games, ancient and modern, fascinate millions of people worldwide. In Seven Games, Oliver Roeder charts their origins and historical importance, the delightful arcana of their rules, and the ways their design makes them pleasurable. Roeder introduces thrilling competitors, such as evangelical minister Marion Tinsley, who across forty years lost only three games of checkers; Shusai, the Master, the last Go champion of imperial Japan, defending tradition against “modern rationalism”; and an IBM engineer who created a backgammon program so capable at self-learning that NASA used it on the space shuttle. He delves into the history and lore of each game: backgammon boards in ancient Egypt, the Indian origins of chess, how certain shells from a particular beach in Japan make the finest white Go stones. Beyond the cultural and personal stories, Roeder explores why games, seemingly trivial pastimes, speak so deeply to the human soul. He introduces an early philosopher of games, the aptly named Bernard Suits, and visits an Oxford cosmologist who has perfected a computer that can effectively play bridge, a game as complicated as human language itself. Throughout, Roeder tells the compelling story of how humans, pursuing scientific glory and competitive advantage, have invented AI programs better than any human player, and what that means for the games—and for us. Funny, fascinating, and profound, Seven Games is a story of obsession, psychology, history, and how play makes us human.

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A Short History of Nearly Everything - Bill Bryson Cover Art

A Short History of Nearly Everything

A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson

One of the world’s most beloved writers and New York Times bestselling author of A Walk in the Woods and The Body  takes his ultimate journey—into the most intriguing and intractable questions that science seeks to answer. In A Walk in the Woods , Bill Bryson trekked the Appalachian Trail — well, most of it. In A Sunburned Country , he confronted some of the most lethal wildlife Australia has to offer. Now, in his biggest book, he confronts his greatest challenge: to understand — and, if possible, answer — the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us. To that end, he has attached himself to a host of the world’s most advanced (and often obsessed) archaeologists, anthropologists, and mathematicians, travelling to their offices, laboratories, and field camps. He has read (or tried to read) their books, pestered them with questions, apprenticed himself to their powerful minds. A Short History of Nearly Everything is the record of this quest, and it is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it. Science has never been more involving or entertaining.

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Why the West Rules—for Now - Ian Morris Cover Art

Why the West Rules—for Now

Why the West Rules—for Now The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future by Ian Morris

A New York Times Notable Book for 2011 Sometime around 1750, English entrepreneurs unleashed the astounding energies of steam and coal, and the world was forever changed. The emergence of factories, railroads, and gunboats propelled the West's rise to power in the nineteenth century, and the development of computers and nuclear weapons in the twentieth century secured its global supremacy. Now, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, many worry that the emerging economic power of China and India spells the end of the West as a superpower. In order to understand this possibility, we need to look back in time. Why has the West dominated the globe for the past two hundred years, and will its power last? Describing the patterns of human history, the archaeologist and historian Ian Morris offers surprising new answers to both questions. It is not, he reveals, differences of race or culture, or even the strivings of great individuals, that explain Western dominance. It is the effects of geography on the everyday efforts of ordinary people as they deal with crises of resources, disease, migration, and climate. As geography and human ingenuity continue to interact, the world will change in astonishing ways, transforming Western rule in the process. Deeply researched and brilliantly argued, Why the West Rules—for Now spans fifty thousand years of history and offers fresh insights on nearly every page. The book brings together the latest findings across disciplines—from ancient history to neuroscience—not only to explain why the West came to rule the world but also to predict what the future will bring in the next hundred years.

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A History of the World in 6 Glasses - Tom Standage Cover Art

A History of the World in 6 Glasses

A History of the World in 6 Glasses by Tom Standage

The New York Times Bestseller "There aren't many books this entertaining that also provide a cogent crash course in ancient, classical and modern history." -Los Angeles Times Beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and Coca-Cola: In Tom Standage's deft, innovative account of world history, these six beverages turn out to be much more than just ways to quench thirst. They also represent six eras that span the course of civilization-from the adoption of agriculture, to the birth of cities, to the advent of globalization. A History of the World in 6 Glasses tells the story of humanity from the Stone Age to the twenty-first century through each epoch's signature refreshment. As Standage persuasively argues, each drink is in fact a kind of technology, advancing culture and catalyzing the intricate interplay of different societies. After reading this enlightening book, you may never look at your favorite drink in quite the same way again.

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The Victorian Internet - Tom Standage Cover Art

The Victorian Internet

The Victorian Internet The Remarkable Story of the Telegraph and the Nineteenth Century's On-line Pioneers by Tom Standage

A new edition of the first book by the bestselling author of A History of the World in 6 Glasses-the fascinating story of the telegraph, the world's first "Internet," which revolutionized the nineteenth century even more than the Internet has the twentieth and twenty first. The Victorian Internet tells the colorful story of the telegraph's creation and remarkable impact, and of the visionaries, oddballs, and eccentrics who pioneered it, from the eighteenth-century French scientist Jean-Antoine Nollet to Samuel F. B. Morse and Thomas Edison. The electric telegraph nullified distance and shrank the world quicker and further than ever before or since, and its story mirrors and predicts that of the Internet in numerous ways.

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1492 - Felipe Fernández-Armesto Cover Art

1492

1492 The Year the World Began by Felipe Fernández-Armesto

1492: The Year the World Began is a look at one of the most fascinating years in world history, the year when many believe the modern world was born. Historian Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, author of Millennium, covers such iconic figures as Christopher Columbus and Alexander Borgia and explores cultures as diverse as that of Spain, China, and Africa to tell the story of 1492, a momentous year whose lessons are still relevant today

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The Mosquito - Timothy C. Winegard Cover Art

The Mosquito

The Mosquito A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator by Timothy C. Winegard

**The instant New York Times bestseller.** *An international bestseller.* Finalist for the Lane Anderson Award Finalist for the RBC Taylor Award “Hugely impressive, a major work.”—NPR A pioneering and groundbreaking work of narrative nonfiction that offers a dramatic new perspective on the history of humankind, showing how through millennia, the mosquito has been the single most powerful force in determining humanity’s fate   Why was gin and tonic the cocktail of choice for British colonists in India and Africa? What does Starbucks have to thank for its global domination? What has protected the lives of popes for millennia? Why did Scotland surrender its sovereignty to England? What was George Washington's secret weapon during the American Revolution? The answer to all these questions, and many more, is the mosquito.   Across our planet since the dawn of humankind, this nefarious pest, roughly the size and weight of a grape seed, has been at the frontlines of history as the grim reaper, the harvester of human populations, and the ultimate agent of historical change. As the mosquito transformed the landscapes of civilization, humans were unwittingly required to respond to its piercing impact and universal projection of power.   The mosquito has determined the fates of empires and nations, razed and crippled economies, and decided the outcome of pivotal wars, killing nearly half of humanity along the way. She (only females bite) has dispatched an estimated 52 billion people from a total of 108 billion throughout our relatively brief existence. As the greatest purveyor of extermination we have ever known, she has played a greater role in shaping our human story than any other living thing with which we share our global village.   Imagine for a moment a world without deadly mosquitoes, or any mosquitoes, for that matter? Our history and the world we know, or think we know, would be completely unrecognizable.   Driven by surprising insights and fast-paced storytelling, The Mosquito is the extraordinary untold story of the mosquito’s reign through human history and her indelible impact on our modern world order.

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Land - Simon Winchester Cover Art

Land

Land How the Hunger for Ownership Shaped the Modern World by Simon Winchester

“In many ways, Land combines bits and pieces of many of Winchester’s previous books into a satisfying, globe-trotting whole. . . . Winchester is, once again, a consummate guide.”—Boston Globe The author of The Professor and the Madman, The Map That Changed the World, and The Perfectionists explores the notion of property—bought, earned, or received; in Europe, Africa, North America, or the South Pacific—through human history, how it has shaped us and what it will mean for our future. Land—whether meadow or mountainside, desert or peat bog, parkland or pasture, suburb or city—is central to our existence. It quite literally underlies and underpins everything. Employing the keen intellect, insatiable curiosity, and narrative verve that are the foundations of his previous bestselling works, Simon Winchester examines what we human beings are doing—and have done—with the billions of acres that together make up the solid surface of our planet. Land: How the Hunger for Ownership Shaped the Modern World examines in depth how we acquire land, how we steward it, how and why we fight over it, and finally, how we can, and on occasion do, come to share it. Ultimately, Winchester confronts the essential question: who actually owns the world’s land—and why does it matter? 

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Accidental Gods - Anna Della Subin Cover Art

Accidental Gods

Accidental Gods On Men Unwittingly Turned Divine by Anna Della Subin

NAMED A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR BY IRISH TIMES AND TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT A provocative history of men who were worshipped as gods that illuminates the connection between power and religion and the role of divinity in a secular age Ever since 1492, when Christopher Columbus made landfall in the New World and was hailed as a heavenly being, the accidental god has haunted the modern age. From Haile Selassie, acclaimed as the Living God in Jamaica, to Britain’s Prince Philip, who became the unlikely center of a new religion on a South Pacific island, men made divine—always men—have appeared on every continent. And because these deifications always emerge at moments of turbulence—civil wars, imperial conquest, revolutions—they have much to teach us. In a revelatory history spanning five centuries, a cast of surprising deities helps to shed light on the thorny questions of how our modern concept of “religion” was invented; why religion and politics are perpetually entangled in our supposedly secular age; and how the power to call someone divine has been used and abused by both oppressors and the oppressed. From nationalist uprisings in India to Nigerien spirit possession cults, Anna Della Subin explores how deification has been a means of defiance for colonized peoples. Conversely, we see how Columbus, Cortés, and other white explorers amplified stories of their godhood to justify their dominion over native peoples, setting into motion the currents of racism and exclusion that have plagued the New World ever since they touched its shores. At once deeply learned and delightfully antic, Accidental Gods offers an unusual keyhole through which to observe the creation of our modern world. It is that rare thing: a lyrical, entertaining work of ideas, one that marks the debut of a remarkable literary career.

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The Great Experiment - Strobe Talbott Cover Art

The Great Experiment

The Great Experiment The Story of Ancient Empires, Modern States, and the Quest for a Global Nation by Strobe Talbott

This dramatic narrative of breathtaking scope and riveting focus puts the "story" back into history. It is the saga of how the most ambitious of big ideas -- that a world made up of many nations can govern itself peacefully -- has played out over the millennia. Humankind's "Great Experiment" goes back to the most ancient of days -- literally to the Garden of Eden -- and into the present, with an eye to the future. Strobe Talbott looks back to the consolidation of tribes into nations -- starting with Israel -- and the absorption of those nations into the empires of Hammurabi, the Pharaohs, Alexander, the Caesars, Charlemagne, Genghis Khan, the Ottomans, and the Hapsburgs, through incessant wars of territory and religion, to modern alliances and the global conflagrations of the twentieth century. He traces the breakthroughs and breakdowns of peace along the way: the Pax Romana, the Treaty of Westphalia, the Concert of Europe, the false start of the League of Nations, the creation of the flawed but indispensable United Nations, the effort to build a "new world order" after the cold war, and America's unique role in modern history as "the master builder" of the international system. Offering an insider's view of how the world is governed today, Talbott interweaves through this epic tale personal insights and experiences and takes us with him behind the scenes and into the presence of world leaders as they square off or cut deals with each other. As an acclaimed journalist, he covered the standoff between the superpowers for more than two decades; as a high-level diplomat, he was in the thick of tumultuous events in the 1990s, when the bipolar equilibrium gave way to chaos in the Balkans, the emergence of a new breed of international terrorist, and America's assertiveness during its "unipolar moment" -- which he sees as the latest, but not the last, stage in the Great Experiment. Talbott concludes with a trenchant critique of the worldview and policies of George W. Bush, whose presidency he calls a "consequential aberration" in the history of American foreign policy. Then, looking beyond the morass in Iraq and the battle for the White House, he argues that the United States can regain the trust of the world by leading the effort to avert the perils of climate change and nuclear catastrophe.

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In the Shadow of the Gods - Dominic Lieven Cover Art

In the Shadow of the Gods

In the Shadow of the Gods The Emperor in World History by Dominic Lieven

A dazzling account of the men (and occasional woman) who led the world’s empires, a book that probes the essence of leadership and power through the centuries and around the world. From the rise of Sargon of Akkad, who in the third millennium BCE ruled what is now Iraq and Syria, to the collapse of the great European empires in the twentieth century, the empire has been the dominant form of power in history. Dominic Lieven’s expansive book explores strengths and failings of the human beings who held those empires together (or let them crumble). He projects the power, terror, magnificence, and confidence of imperial monarchy, tracking what they had in common as well as what made some rise to glory and others fail spectacularly, and at what price each destiny was reached. Lieven’s characters—Constantine, Chinggis Khan, Trajan, Suleyman, Hadrian, Louis XIV, Maria Theresa, Peter the Great, Queen Victoria, and dozens more—come alive with color, energy, and detail: their upbringings, their loves, their crucial spouses, their dreadful children. They illustrate how politics and government are a gruelling business: a ruler needed stamina, mental and physical toughness, and self-confidence. He or she needed the sound judgement of problems and people which is partly innate but also the product of education and experience. A good brain was essential for setting priorities, weighing conflicting advice, and matching ends to needs. A diplomatically astute marriage was often even more essential.    Emperors (and the rare empresses) could be sacred symbols, warrior kings, political leaders, chief executive officers of the government machine, heads of a family, and impresarios directing the many elements of "soft power" essential to any regime’s survival. What was it like to live and work in such an extraordinary role? What qualities did it take to perform this role successfully? Lieven traces the shifting balance among these elements across eras  that encompass a staggering array of events from the rise of the world’s great religions to the scientific revolution, the expansion of European empires across oceans, the great twentieth century conflicts, and the triumph of nationalism over imperialism. The rule of the emperor may be over, but Lieven shows us how we live with its poltical and cultural legacies today. 

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Migration in World History - Patrick Manning & Tiffany Trimmer Cover Art

Migration in World History

Migration in World History by Patrick Manning & Tiffany Trimmer

In this third edition of Migration in World History , Patrick Manning presents an expanded and newly coherent view of migratory processes, conveying new research and interpretation. The engaging narrative shows the continuity of migratory processes from the time of foragers who settled the earth to farmers opening new fields and merchants linking purchasers everywhere. In the last thousand years, accumulation of wealth brought capitalism, industry, and the travels of free and slave migrants. In a contest of civilizational hierarchy and movements of emancipation, nations arose to replace empires, although conflicts within nations expelled refugees. The future of migration is now a serious concern. The new edition includes: An introduction to the migration theories that explain the shifting patterns of migration in early and recent times Quantification of changes in migration, including international migration, domestic urbanization, and growing refugee movements A new chapter tracing twenty-first-century migration and population from 2000 to 2050, showing how migrants escaping climate change will steadily outnumber refugees from other social conflicts While migration is often stressful, it contributes to diversity, exchanges, new perspectives, and innovations. This comprehensive and up-to-date view of migration will stimulate readers with interests in many fields.

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The Story of Work - Jan Lucassen Cover Art

The Story of Work

The Story of Work by Jan Lucassen

The first truly global history of work, an upbeat assessment from the age of the hunter-gatherer to the present day We work because we have to, but also because we like it: from hunting-gathering over 700,000 years ago to the present era of zoom meetings, humans have always worked to make the world around them serve their needs. Jan Lucassen provides an inclusive history of humanity’s busy labor throughout the ages. Spanning China, India, Africa, the Americas, and Europe, Lucassen looks at the ways in which humanity organizes work: in the household, the tribe, the city, and the state. He examines how labor is split between men, women, and children; the watershed moment of the invention of money; the collective action of workers; and at the impact of migration, slavery, and the idea of leisure. From peasant farmers in the first agrarian societies to the precarious existence of today’s gig workers, this surprising account of both cooperation and subordination at work throws essential light on the opportunities we face today.

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The History Book - DK Cover Art

The History Book

The History Book Big Ideas Simply Explained by DK

Travel thousands of years into our past and discover the significant events that shaped the world as we know it. This book includes short, descriptive explanations of key ideas, themes, and events of world history that are easy to understand. Explore topics such as the founding of Baghdad, the colonization of the Americas, and the inception of Buddhism without complicated jargon. This book is part of DK's award-winning Big Ideas Simply Explained educational series that uses witty graphics and engaging descriptions to enlighten readers. Don't stop at American history, explore the world! This book is full of fun facts from the human story, going as far back as the origins of our species to space exploration today. Discover all things revolution, from the French to the digital, including the rise of the internet. Enjoy short and sweet biographies of some of the most important thinkers and leaders throughout history, like Martin Luther, Charles Darwin, and Nelson Mandela. You'll learn who said famous historical quotes, and what they really meant when they said it. Big Ideas This is a modern twist on the good old-fashioned encyclopedia, now easier to follow with diagrams, mind maps, and timelines. Step-by-step diagrams will have you reviewing your ideas about history. Start from the very beginning: - Human Origins 200,000 years ago - 3500 BGE - Ancient Civilizations 6000 BGE - 500 CE - The Medieval World 500 - 1492 - Early Modern Era 1420 - 1795 - Changing Societies 1776 - 1914 - The Modern World 1914 - Present The Series Simply Explained With over 7 million copies sold worldwide to date, The History Book is part of the award-winning Big Ideas Simply Explained series from DK Books. It uses innovative graphics along with engaging writing to make complex subjects easier to understand.

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The True History of Jesus' Birth Death and What It Means To You and Me - Elijah Muhammad Cover Art

The True History of Jesus' Birth Death and What It Means To You and Me

The True History of Jesus' Birth Death and What It Means To You and Me by Elijah Muhammad

This book is the complete 22 part series of The history of Jesus, Joseph (his real father) and mother, Mary, as given by Messenger Elijah Muhammad. He renders an exceptional analysis in a most simplistic, yet indepth manner. The book is written is clear language with scriptural references from the Bible as well as the Holy Qur'an. It is excellently written.

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The Silk Roads - Peter Frankopan Cover Art

The Silk Roads

The Silk Roads A New History of the World by Peter Frankopan

Far more than a history of the Silk Roads, this book is truly a revelatory new history of the world, promising to destabilize notions of where we come from and where we are headed next. From the Middle East and its political instability to China and its economic rise, the vast region stretching eastward from the Balkans across the steppe and South Asia has been thrust into the global spotlight in recent years. Frankopan teaches us that to understand what is at stake for the cities and nations built on these intricate trade routes, we must first understand their astounding pasts.   Frankopan realigns our understanding of the world, pointing us eastward. It was on the Silk Roads that East and West first encountered each other through trade and conquest, leading to the spread of ideas, cultures and religions. From the rise and fall of empires to the spread of Buddhism and the advent of Christianity and Islam, right up to the great wars of the twentieth century—this book shows how the fate of the West has always been inextricably linked to the East. Also available: The New Silk Roads , a timely exploration of the dramatic and profound changes our world is undergoing right now—as seen from the perspective of the rising powers of the East.

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Érase una vez México 1 - Sandra Molina & Alejandro Rosas Cover Art

Érase una vez México 1

Érase una vez México 1 De las cavernas al virreinato by Sandra Molina & Alejandro Rosas

Esta es la historia de un grupo de hombres que comenzó en las cavernas y luego de miles de años, encontraron una señal: un águila posada en un nopal devorando una serpiente. Es también el recuento del nacimiento y caída de la gran Tenochtitlán, símbolo hegemónico de uno de los imperios con mayor influencia en la América precolombina. Y es la crónica del surgimiento de la Nueva España con su esplendor virreinal, preámbulo de la tormenta independentista que se avecinaba en los dominios de la Corona española. Así inicia el primer volumen de la colección ÉRASE UNA VEZ MÉXICO, una manera distinta de redescubrir el pasado mexicano y despertar la curiosidad del lector sin frivolidades ni alegorías. Esta colección nos invita a adentrarnos en los acontecimientos que definieron el rumbo de lo que hoy es nuestra nación, sin la distorsión de los mitos ni el enorme peso del resentimiento; sin odios heredados ni la "patriótica" obligación de enjuiciar lapidariamente a quienes ya fueron condenados. A través de estas páginas, los hechos adquieren nombre y rostro con la intención de que así, de una vez por todas, logremos entender de dónde venimos para saber hacia dónde vamos.

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The Fabric of Civilization - Virginia Postrel Cover Art

The Fabric of Civilization

The Fabric of Civilization How Textiles Made the World by Virginia Postrel

From Paleolithic flax to 3D knitting, explore the global history of textiles and the world they weave together in this enthralling and educational guide. The story of humanity is the story of textiles -- as old as civilization itself. Since the first thread was spun, the need for textiles has driven technology, business, politics, and culture. In The Fabric of Civilization , Virginia Postrel synthesizes groundbreaking research from archaeology, economics, and science to reveal a surprising history. From Minoans exporting wool colored with precious purple dye to Egypt, to Romans arrayed in costly Chinese silk, the cloth trade paved the crossroads of the ancient world. Textiles funded the Renaissance and the Mughal Empire; they gave us banks and bookkeeping, Michelangelo's David and the Taj Mahal. The cloth business spread the alphabet and arithmetic, propelled chemical research, and taught people to think in binary code. Assiduously researched and deftly narrated, The Fabric of Civilization tells the story of the world's most influential commodity.

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Historia del mundo contada para escépticos - Juan Eslava Galán Cover Art

Historia del mundo contada para escépticos

Historia del mundo contada para escépticos by Juan Eslava Galán

Juan Eslava Galán, que nos deleitó consu ya mítica Historia de España contadapara escépticos , nos sorprende ahora con una historia del mundo igualmente ágil y divertida, provocadora y didáctica, que entre sonrisas o francas carcajadas nos conducirá en breves y sustanciosos capítulos desde el Big Bang que provocó el origen del universo hasta la globalización y las crisis de nuestros días. Un texto sin desperdicio en el que no falta su habitual estilo sarcástico y siempre provocativo, que despeja cuestiones tan «candentes» como por qué era irresistible Cleopatra o por qué Franco permaneció en el poder gracias a Stalin.

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A Less Boring History of the World - Dave Rear Cover Art

A Less Boring History of the World

A Less Boring History of the World by Dave Rear

Refreshes the parts other history books can’t reach... A bit ropy on the Renaissance? In the dark about the Enlightenment? Or, in fact, do you need a revision course on the entire history of the world and want to read a witty, irreverent, definitely not boring romp through everything that has ever happened on planet earth – from 15 billion years BC to the present day? Good. A Less Boring History of the World tells you everything you need to know from the Big Bang to Barack Obama, taking in the Byzantines, the Black Death, Bin Laden and the fall of bankers along the way, all boiled down to bite size chunks so that you can finally piece together all the different bits of history - and see how on earth we ended up in the mess we are today. A Less Boring History refreshes your memory and broadens your mind. And, if that’s not enough, it will also make you laugh. A lot.

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The Outline of History (Illustrated) - H.G. Wells Cover Art

The Outline of History (Illustrated)

The Outline of History (Illustrated) by H.G. Wells

THIS Outline of History is an attempt to tell, truly and clearly, in one continuous narrative, the whole story of life and mankind so far as it is known to-day. It is written plainly for the general reader, but its aim goes beyond its use as merely interesting reading matter. There is a feeling abroad that the teaching of history considered as a part of general education is in an unsatisfactory condition, and particularly that the ordinary treatment of this “subject” by the class and teacher and examiner is too partial and narrow. But the desire to extend the general range of historical ideas is confronted by the argument that the available time for instruction is already consumed by that partial and narrow treatment, and that therefore, however desirable this extension of range may be, it is in practice impossible. If an Englishman, for example, has found the history of England quite enough for his powers of assimilation, then it seems hopeless to expect his sons and daughters to master universal history, if that is to consist of the history of England, plus the history of France, plus the history of Germany, plus the history of Russia, and so on. To which the only possible answer is that universal history is at once something more and something less than the aggregate of the national histories to which we are accustomed, that it must be approached in a different spirit and dealt with in a different manner. This book seeks to justify that answer. It has been written primarily to show that history as one whole is amenable to a more broad and comprehensive handling than is the history of special nations and periods, a broader handling that will bring it within the normal limitations of time and energy set to the reading and education of an ordinary citizen. This outline deals with ages and races and nations, where the ordinary history deals with reigns and pedigrees and campaigns; but it will not be found to be more crowded with names and dates, nor more difficult to follow and understand. History is no exception amongst the sciences; as the gaps fill in, the outline simplifies; as the outlook broadens, the clustering multitude of details dissolves into general laws. And many topics of quite primary interest to mankind, the first appearance and the growth of scientific knowledge for example, and its effects upon human life, the elaboration of the ideas of money and credit, or the story of the origins and spread and influence of Christianity, which must be treated fragmentarily or by elaborate digressions in any partial history, arise and flow completely and naturally in one general record of the world in which we live.  The need for a common knowledge of the general facts of human history throughout the world has become very evident during the tragic happenings of the last few years. Swifter means of communication have brought all men closer to one another for good or for evil. War becomes a universal disaster, blind and monstrously destructive; it bombs the baby in its cradle and sinks the food-ships that cater for the non-combatant and the neutral. There can be no peace now, we realize, but a common peace in all the world; no prosperity but a general prosperity. But there can be no common peace and prosperity without common historical ideas. Without such ideas to hold them together in harmonious co-operation, with nothing but narrow, selfish, and conflicting nationalist traditions, races and peoples are bound to drift towards conflict and destruction. This truth, which was apparent to that great philosopher Kant a century or more ago—it is the gist of his tract upon universal peace—is now plain to the man in the street. Our internal policies and our economic and social ideas are profoundly vitiated at present by wrong and fantastic ideas of the origin and historical relationship of social classes. A sense of history as the common adventure of all mankind is as necessary for peace within as it is for peace between the nations.

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Climate Change in Human History - Benjamin Lieberman & Elizabeth Gordon Cover Art

Climate Change in Human History

Climate Change in Human History Prehistory to the Present by Benjamin Lieberman & Elizabeth Gordon

Climate Change and Human History provides an up-to-date and concise introduction to the relationship between human beings and climate change throughout history. Starting with periods hundreds of thousands of years ago and continuing up to the present day, the book illustrates how natural climate variability affected early human societies, and how humans are now altering climate drastically within much shorter periods of time. For each major period of time, the book will explain how climate change has created opportunities as well as risks and challenges for human societies. The book introduces and develops several related themes including: Phases of climate and history Factors that shape climate Climate shocks and sharp climate shifts Climate and the rise and fall of civilizations Industrialization and climate science Accelerating climate change, human societies, and the future An ideal companion for all students of environmental history, Climate Change and Human History clearly demonstrates the critical role of climate in shaping human history and of the experience of humans in both adapting to and shaping climate change.

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Keeping Their Place - Pamela Sambrook Cover Art

Keeping Their Place

Keeping Their Place Domestic Service in the Country House 1700-1920 by Pamela Sambrook

In 1851 there were over a million servants in Britain. This book reveals first-hand tales of put-upon servants, who often had to rise hours before dawn to lay fires, heat water and prepare meals for their employers, and then work into the small hours. Yet there are also heartwarming stories of personal devotion, and reward, and of how the servants enjoyed themselves in their time off. There are moments of great poignancy as well as hilarity: a steward's dawning realisation that the housekeeper he befriended is a thief; a young footman chasing a melon as it rolls through a castle's corridors into the moat; the smart manservant weeping at the station as he bids farewell to his mother. This was an era when footmen were paid extra for being six foot or over, and female servants had to wear black bonnets to church.

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The Lessons of History - Will Durant Cover Art

The Lessons of History

The Lessons of History by Will Durant

A concise survey of the culture and civilization of mankind, The Lessons of History is the result of a lifetime of research from Pulitzer Prize–winning historians Will and Ariel Durant. With their accessible compendium of philosophy and social progress, the Durants take us on a journey through history, exploring the possibilities and limitations of humanity over time. Juxtaposing the great lives, ideas, and accomplishments with cycles of war and conquest, the Durants reveal the towering themes of history and give meaning to our own.

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Enuma Elish: The Epic Of Creation - L.W. King Cover Art

Enuma Elish: The Epic Of Creation

Enuma Elish: The Epic Of Creation by L.W. King

Enuma Elish: The Epic Of Creation by L.W. King The Babylonian and Assyrian Legends Concerning the Creation of the World and of Mankind. The Enuma Elish is one of the oldest stories known to mankind. It is a story first written down by the ancient Sumerians thousands of years ago. As a one time assistant in the Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities at the British Museum, L.W. King provides us with a qualified translation of the tablets which were originally written in cuneiform script. The Enuma Elish is receiving renewed interest from modern researchers delving into the origins of mankind, the earth, and the solar system. Over the centuries a copy ended up in the library at Nineveh in the 7th century B.C., and was uncovered by archaeologists in the late 1800s. Written in cuneiform text and preserved on seven clay tablets, the entire story was called "The Seven Tablets of Creation." After being translated the story revealed how the planets became aligned, how a cosmic catastrophe affected the earth, how mankind came upon the scene, and how the "gods" played a role in all of it. The Seven Tablets of Creation have had many profound implications since they were first discovered and subsequently published. They predate many parts of the Book of Genesis as well as other worldwide creation myths. Volume One includes this epic poem's English translation. It also includes information on parallels in Hebrew literature, the date and origin of the Babylonian creation legends, and more. Volume Two includes other accounts of creation, an Assyrian "Tower of Dabel" story, and supplementary texts showing the actual cuneiform tablets.

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Homo Deus - Yuval Noah Harari Cover Art

Homo Deus

Homo Deus Breve historia del mañana by Yuval Noah Harari

Tras el éxito de Sapiens , Yuval Noah Harari vuelve su mirada al futuro para ver hacia dónde nos dirigimos. Bestseller del New York Times con 1 millón de ejemplares vendidos Yuval Noah Harari, autor de Sapiens , un fenómeno internacional unánimemente aclamado por la crítica, regresa con una secuela igualmente original, convincente y provocadora, centrando su atención en el futuro de la humanidad y en nuestra obsesión por convertirnos en dioses. A lo largo del último siglo, la humanidad ha logrado lo imposible frenando la hambruna, la peste y la guerra. Por primera vez en la historia, más personas mueren por obesidad que por pasar hambre y hay más probabilidades de quitarse la vida que de morir en un conflicto bélico o un atentado terrorista. ¿Qué pasará con la democracia cuando Google y Facebook lleguen a conocer nuestros gustos y preferencias políticas mejor que nos conocemos a nosotros mismos? ¿Qué pasará con el estado de bienestar cuando la inteligencia artificial expulse a los individuos del mercado laboral, creando una «clase innecesaria» de humanos ? ¿Cómo podremos lidiar con los avances en ingeniería genética? ¿Terminará Silicon Valley por establecer nuevas religiones en lugar de enfocarse a producir únicamente dispositivos inteligentes? Homo Deus explora los proyectos, los sueños y las pesadillas que configurarán el siglo XXI: desde superar la muerte hasta la creación de la inteligencia y la vida artificial. ¿Hacia dónde nos dirigimos? ¿Cómo protegeremos al mundo de nuestros propios poderes destructivos? He aquí una mirada hacia el futuro de la evolución. He aquí Homo Deus . Reseñas: «Yuval Noah Harari, autor del fenómeno Sapiens , reflexiona sobre el futuro de la humanidad en Homo Deus , un libro de prosa inteligente, fresca y libre de prejuicios.» Jorge Wagensberg, Babelia «Aún más legible, incluso más importante que su excelente Sapiens .» Kazuo Ishiguro, Premio Nobel de Literatura « Homo Deus te impactará y te cautivará, pero sobre todo te hará pensar como nunca antes.» Daniel Kahneman, Premio Nobel de Economía «Harari se convierte en una especie de filósofo del futuro que desarrolla las intuiciones de su primera obra [...] un ritmo y una energía que convierten Homo Deus en un libro francamente ameno.» El Cultural «El épico y mundialmente celebrado Sapiens recibe la secuela que necesitaba: una intensa y compulsiva investigación sobre el apocalipsis de la humanidad en un futuro impulsado por la tecnología.» The Guardian «Un libro implacable y fascinante que seguramente se convertirá, y merece ser un éxito de ventas.» Kirkus Review «Un estimulante libro que lleva al lector a profundizar sobre cuestiones de identidad, conciencia e inteligencia.» The Observer «Un brebaje embriagador de ciencia, filosofía y futurismo.» Mail on Sunday «Un estudio brillante, original, estimulante e importante sobre hacia dónde se dirige la humanidad.» Evening Standard

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The Greeks - Roderick Beaton Cover Art

The Greeks

The Greeks A Global History by Roderick Beaton

A sweeping history of the Greeks, from the Bronze Age to today   More than two thousand years ago, the Greek city-states, led by Athens and Sparta, laid the foundation for much of modern science, the arts, politics, and law. But the influence of the Greeks did not end with the rise and fall of this classical civilization. As historian Roderick Beaton illustrates, over three millennia Greek speakers produced a series of civilizations that were rooted in southeastern Europe but again and again ranged widely across the globe.     In  The Greeks , Beaton traces this history from the Bronze Age Mycenaeans who built powerful fortresses at home and strong trade routes abroad, to the dramatic Eurasian conquests of Alexander the Great, to the pious Byzantines who sought to export Christianity worldwide, to today’s Greek diaspora, which flourishes on five continents. The product of decades of research, this is the story of the Greeks and their global impact told as never before.  

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The End Is Always Near - Dan Carlin Cover Art

The End Is Always Near

The End Is Always Near Apocalyptic Moments, from the Bronze Age Collapse to Nuclear Near Misses by Dan Carlin

Now a New York Times Bestseller. The creator of the wildly popular award-winning podcast Hardcore History looks at some of the apocalyptic moments from the past as a way to frame the challenges of the future. Do tough times create tougher people? Can humanity handle the power of its weapons without destroying itself? Will human technology or capabilities ever peak or regress? No one knows the answers to such questions, but no one asks them in a more interesting way than Dan Carlin. In The End is Always Near, Dan Carlin looks at questions and historical events that force us to consider what sounds like fantasy; that we might suffer the same fate that all previous eras did. Will our world ever become a ruin for future archaeologists to dig up and explore? The questions themselves are both philosophical and like something out of The Twilight Zone. Combining his trademark mix of storytelling, history and weirdness Dan Carlin connects the past and future in fascinating and colorful ways. At the same time the questions he asks us to consider involve the most important issue imaginable: human survival. From the collapse of the Bronze Age to the challenges of the nuclear era the issue has hung over humanity like a persistent Sword of Damocles. Inspired by his podcast, The End is Always Near challenges the way we look at the past and ourselves. In this absorbing compendium, Carlin embarks on a whole new set of stories and major cliffhangers that will keep readers enthralled. Idiosyncratic and erudite, offbeat yet profound, The End is Always Near examines issues that are rarely presented, and makes the past immediately relevant to our very turbulent present.

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The Rise and Fall of Communism - Archie Brown Cover Art

The Rise and Fall of Communism

The Rise and Fall of Communism by Archie Brown

“A work of considerable delicacy and nuance….Brown has crafted a readable and judicious account of Communist history…that is both controversial and commonsensical.” —Salon.com “Ranging wisely and lucidly across the decades and around the world, this is a splendid book.” —William Taubman, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Khrushchev: The Man and His Era The Rise and Fall of Communism is the definitive history from the internationally renowned Oxford authority on the subject. Emeritus Professor of Politics at Oxford University, Archie Brown examines the origins of the most important political ideology of the 20th century, its development in different nations, its collapse in the Soviet Union following perestroika, and its current incarnations around the globe. Fans of John Lewis Gaddis, Samuel Huntington, and avid students of history will appreciate the sweep and insight of this epic and astonishing work.

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The Victory of Reason - Rodney Stark Cover Art

The Victory of Reason

The Victory of Reason How Christianity Led to Freedom, Capitalism, and Western Success by Rodney Stark

Many books have been written about the success of the West, analyzing why Europe was able to pull ahead of the rest of the world by the end of the Middle Ages. The most common explanations cite the West’s superior geography, commerce, and technology. Completely overlooked is the fact that faith in reason, rooted in Christianity’s commitment to rational theology, made all these developments possible. Simply put, the conventional wisdom that Western success depended upon overcoming religious barriers to progress is utter nonsense.In The Victory of Reason, Rodney Stark advances a revolutionary, controversial, and long overdue idea: that Christianity and its related institutions are, in fact, directly responsible for the most significant intellectual, political, scientific, and economic breakthroughs of the past millennium. In Stark’s view, what has propelled the West is not the tension between secular and nonsecular society, nor the pitting of science and the humanities against religious belief. Christian theology, Stark asserts, is the very font of reason: While the world’s other great belief systems emphasized mystery, obedience, or introspection, Christianity alone embraced logic and reason as the path toward enlightenment, freedom, and progress. That is what made all the difference.In explaining the West’s dominance, Stark convincingly debunks long-accepted “truths.” For instance, by contending that capitalism thrived centuries before there was a Protestant work ethic–or even Protestants–he counters the notion that the Protestant work ethic was responsible for kicking capitalism into overdrive. In the fifth century, Stark notes, Saint Augustine celebrated theological and material progress and the institution of “exuberant invention.” By contrast, long before Augustine, Aristotle had condemned commercial trade as “inconsistent with human virtue”–which helps further underscore that Augustine’s times were not the Dark Ages but the incubator for the West’s future glories. This is a sweeping, multifaceted survey that takes readers from the Old World to the New, from the past to the present, overturning along the way not only centuries of prejudiced scholarship but the antireligious bias of our own time. The Victory of Reason proves that what we most admire about our world–scientific progress, democratic rule, free commerce–is largely due to Christianity, through which we are all inheritors of this grand tradition.

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Doomed to Repeat - Bill Fawcett Cover Art

Doomed to Repeat

Doomed to Repeat The Lessons of History We've Failed to Learn by Bill Fawcett

“Those who forget history are doomed to repeat it.” And so we have. Time and again, mankind has faced down problems, but have often failed to take the hard-earned knowledge into the next battle. Doomed to Repeat is a collection of essays, edited by Bill Fawcett, that illuminates some of the problems we've faced repeatedly throughout history, including Islamic jihad, terrorism, military insurgencies, inflation and the devaluation of currency, financial disasters, ecological collapses, radical political minorities like the Nazis and Bolsheviks, and pandemics and epidemics like the Black Death. With more than 35 chapters of the Groundhog Days of world history, both infamous and obscure, Doomed to Repeat: The Lessons of History We've Failed to Learn is chock-full of trivia, history, and fascinating looks at the world’s repeated mistakes.

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King and Emperor - Janet L. Nelson Cover Art

King and Emperor

King and Emperor A New Life of Charlemagne by Janet L. Nelson

" King and Emperor  takes on the compelling suspense of good detective work as well as good history."— The Wall Street Journal Charles I, often known as Charlemagne, is one of the most extraordinary figures ever to rule an empire. Driven by unremitting physical energy and intellectual curiosity, he was a man of many parts, a warlord and conqueror, a judge who promised "for each their law and justice," a defender of the Latin Church, a man of flesh and blood. In the twelve centuries since his death, warfare, accident, vermin, and the elements have destroyed much of the writing on his rule, but a remarkable amount has survived. Janet Nelson's wonderful new book brings together everything we know about Charles I, sifting through the available evidence, literary and material, to paint a vivid portrait of the man and his motives.   Building on Nelson’s own extraordinary knowledge, this biography is a sort of detective story, prying into and interpreting fascinating and often obdurate scraps of evidence, from prayer books to skeletons, gossip to artwork. Charles’s legacy lies in his deeds and their continuing resonance, as he shaped counties, countries, and continents; founded and rebuilt towns and monasteries; and consciously set himself up not just as King of the Franks, but as the head of the renewed Roman Empire. His successors—even to the present day—have struggled to interpret, misinterpret, copy, or subvert his legacy. Janet Nelson gets us as close as we can hope to come to the real figure of Charles the man as he was understood in his own time.

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50 cosas que hay que saber sobre Historia del mundo - Ian Crofton Cover Art

50 cosas que hay que saber sobre Historia del mundo

50 cosas que hay que saber sobre Historia del mundo by Ian Crofton

Los hechos cruciales para entender la Historia del mundo, desde el inicio de la agricultura hasta el ataque a las Torres Gemelas, pasando por el Egipto faraónico o la Revolución Francesa. ¿Existe un concepto más amplio que el de Historia del mundo? Parece difícil. E imposible el propósito de resumirlo en tan breve libro. Sin embargo, sí que parece plausible establecer una cronología esquemática que establecieron nuevas fronteras, personajes que han influenciado a generaciones posteriores, obras que forman parte de nuestro acervo o credos que definieron nuestros usos y costumbres. Un recorrido que incluye acontecimientos e ideas como el hombre renacentista, la ciencia islámica, los corsarios, la colonización y el confucionismo, y se adentra en los momentos clave en los que España ha sido protagonista de la Historia, tales como el Imperio español o la guerra civil. Un fugaz itinerario que proporcionará al lector conocimientos esenciales sobre los que posteriormente profundizar.

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Empires in World History - Jane Burbank & Frederick Cooper Cover Art

Empires in World History

Empires in World History Power and the Politics of Difference by Jane Burbank & Frederick Cooper

How empires have used diversity to shape the world order for more than two millennia Empires—vast states of territories and peoples united by force and ambition—have dominated the political landscape for more than two millennia. Empires in World History departs from conventional European and nation-centered perspectives to take a remarkable look at how empires relied on diversity to shape the global order. Beginning with ancient Rome and China and continuing across Asia, Europe, the Americas, and Africa, Jane Burbank and Frederick Cooper examine empires' conquests, rivalries, and strategies of domination—with an emphasis on how empires accommodated, created, and manipulated differences among populations. Burbank and Cooper examine Rome and China from the third century BCE, empires that sustained state power for centuries. They delve into the militant monotheism of Byzantium, the Islamic Caliphates, and the short-lived Carolingians, as well as the pragmatically tolerant rule of the Mongols and Ottomans, who combined religious protection with the politics of loyalty. Burbank and Cooper discuss the influence of empire on capitalism and popular sovereignty, the limitations and instability of Europe's colonial projects, Russia's repertoire of exploitation and differentiation, as well as the "empire of liberty"—devised by American revolutionaries and later extended across a continent and beyond. With its investigation into the relationship between diversity and imperial states, Empires in World History offers a fresh approach to understanding the impact of empires on the past and present.

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Over the Edge of the World - Laurence Bergreen Cover Art

Over the Edge of the World

Over the Edge of the World Magellan's Terrifying Circumnavigation of the Globe by Laurence Bergreen

“A first-rate historical page turner.” —New York Times Book Review The acclaimed and bestselling account of Ferdinand Magellan’s historic 60,000-mile ocean voyage. Ferdinand Magellan's daring circumnavigation of the globe in the sixteenth century was a three-year odyssey filled with sex, violence, and amazing adventure. Now in Over the Edge of the World, prize-winning biographer and journalist Laurence Bergreen entwines a variety of candid, firsthand accounts, bringing to life this groundbreaking and majestic tale of discovery that changed both the way explorers would henceforth navigate the oceans and history itself. Now updated to include a new introduction commemorating the 500th anniversary of Magellan’s voyage.

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The 900 Days - Harrison Salisbury Cover Art

The 900 Days

The 900 Days The Siege Of Leningrad by Harrison Salisbury

The Nazi siege of Leningrad from 1941 to 1943, during which time the city was cut off from the rest of the world, was one of the most gruesome episodes of World War II. In scale, the tragedy of Leningrad dwarfs even the Warsaw ghetto or Hiroshima. Nearly three million people endured it; just under half of them died, starving or freezing to death, most in the six months from October 1941 to April 1942 when the temperature often stayed at 30 degrees below zero. For twenty-five years the distinguished journalist and historian Harrison Salisbury has assembled material for this story. He has interviewed survivors, sifted through the Russian archives, and drawn on his vast experience as a correspondent in the Soviet Union. What he has discovered and imparted in The 900 Days is an epic narrative of villainy and survival, in which the city had as much to fear from Stalin as from Hitler. He concludes his story with the culminating disaster of the Leningrad Affair, a plot hatched by Stalin three years after the war had ended. Almost every official who had been instrumental in the city's survival was implicated, convicted, and executed. Harrison Salisbury has told this overwhelming story boldly, unforgettably, and definitively.

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Our Oriental Heritage - Will Durant Cover Art

Our Oriental Heritage

Our Oriental Heritage The Story of Civilization, Volume I by Will Durant

The Story of Civilization , Volume I: A history of civilization in Egypt and the Near East to the Death of Alexander, and in India, China, and Japan from the beginning; with an introduction on the nature and foundations of civilization. This is the first volume of the classic Pulitzer Prize-winning series.

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Dominion - Tom Holland Cover Art

Dominion

Dominion How the Christian Revolution Remade the World by Tom Holland

A "marvelous" ( Economist ) account of how the Christian Revolution forged the Western imagination.  Crucifixion, the Romans believed, was the worst fate imaginable, a punishment reserved for slaves. How astonishing it was, then, that people should have come to believe that one particular victim of crucifixion-an obscure provincial by the name of Jesus-was to be worshipped as a god. Dominion explores the implications of this shocking conviction as they have reverberated throughout history. Today, the West remains utterly saturated by Christian assumptions. As Tom Holland demonstrates, our morals and ethics are not universal but are instead the fruits of a very distinctive civilization. Concepts such as secularism, liberalism, science, and homosexuality are deeply rooted in a Christian seedbed. From Babylon to the Beatles, Saint Michael to #MeToo, Dominion tells the story of how Christianity transformed the modern world. 

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Занимательная Греция. Капитолийская волчица (сборник) - Михаил Гаспаров Cover Art

Занимательная Греция. Капитолийская волчица (сборник) by Михаил Гаспаров

Михаил Леонович Гаспаров (1935–2005) – филолог-классик, литературовед, историк античной литературы и русской поэзии, переводчик античной, средневековой и новой поэзии и прозы. «Занимательная Греция» – своеобразная энциклопедия древнегреческой культуры, в шести частях этой увлекательной книги (с IX по 11 в. до н. э.) рассматриваются и политика, и быт, и военное искусство, и философия, и театр, и поэзия – все в неразрывной связи друг с другом и с эпохой. В книгу «Капитолийская волчица. Рим до цезарей» вошли истории об основании Вечного города на семи холмах, мудрости его законодателей, простоте нравов, самоотверженности граждан и доблести воинов.

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A Little History of the World - E. H. Gombrich & Clifford Harper Cover Art

A Little History of the World

A Little History of the World by E. H. Gombrich & Clifford Harper

The international bestseller: E. H. Gombrich’s sweeping history of the world, for the curious of all ages   “All stories begin with ‘Once upon a time.’ And that’s just what this story is all about: what happened, once upon a time.” So begins A Little History of the World , an engaging and lively book written for readers both young and old. Rather than focusing on dry facts and dates, E. H. Gombrich vividly brings the full span of human experience on Earth to life, from the stone age to the atomic age. He paints a colorful picture of wars and conquests; of grand works of art; of the advances and limitations of science; of remarkable people and remarkable events, from Confucius to Catherine the Great to Winston Churchill, and from the invention of art to the destruction of the Berlin Wall.   For adults seeking a single-volume overview of world history, for students in search of a quick refresher course, or for families to read and learn from together, Gombrich’s Little History enchants and educates.

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The March of Folly - Barbara W. Tuchman Cover Art

The March of Folly

The March of Folly From Troy to Vietnam by Barbara W. Tuchman

Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Barbara W. Tuchman, author of the World War I masterpiece The Guns of August, grapples with her boldest subject: the pervasive presence, through the ages, of failure, mismanagement, and delusion in government.   Drawing on a comprehensive array of examples, from Montezuma’s senseless surrender of his empire in 1520 to Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, Barbara W. Tuchman defines folly as the pursuit by government of policies contrary to their own interests, despite the availability of feasible alternatives. In brilliant detail, Tuchman illuminates four decisive turning points in history that illustrate the very heights of folly: the Trojan War, the breakup of the Holy See provoked by the Renaissance popes, the loss of the American colonies by Britain’s George III, and the United States’ own persistent mistakes in Vietnam. Throughout The March of Folly, Tuchman’s incomparable talent for animating the people, places, and events of history is on spectacular display.   Praise for The March of Folly   “A glittering narrative . . . a moral [book] on the crimes and follies of governments and the misfortunes the governed suffer in consequence.” —The New York Times Book Review   “An admirable survey . . . I haven’t read a more relevant book in years.” —John Kenneth Galbraith, The Boston Sunday Globe   “A superb chronicle . . . a masterly examination.” —Chicago Sun-Times

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Discourse on Colonialism - Aimé Césaire Cover Art

Discourse on Colonialism

Discourse on Colonialism by Aimé Césaire

"Césaire's essay stands as an important document in the development of third world consciousness--a process in which [he] played a prominent role." --Library Journal This classic work, first published in France in 1955, profoundly influenced the generation of scholars and activists at the forefront of liberation struggles in Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Nearly twenty years later, when published for the first time in English, Discourse on Colonialism inspired a new generation engaged in the Civil Rights, Black Power, and anti-war movements and has sold more than 75,000 copies to date. Aimé Césaire eloquently describes the brutal impact of capitalism and colonialism on both the colonizer and colonized, exposing the contradictions and hypocrisy implicit in western notions of "progress" and "civilization" upon encountering the "savage," "uncultured," or "primitive." Here, Césaire reaffirms African values, identity, and culture, and their relevance, reminding us that "the relationship between consciousness and reality are extremely complex. . . . It is equally necessary to decolonize our minds, our inner life, at the same time that we decolonize society." An interview with Césaire by the poet René Depestre is also included.

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A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things - Raj Patel & Jason W. Moore Cover Art

A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things

A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet by Raj Patel & Jason W. Moore

Nature, money, work, care, food, energy, and lives: these are the seven things that have made our world and will shape its future. In making these things cheap, modern commerce has transformed, governed, and devastated Earth. In  A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things , Raj Patel and Jason W. Moore present a new approach to analyzing today’s planetary emergencies. Bringing the latest ecological research together with histories of colonialism, indigenous struggles, slave revolts, and other rebellions and uprisings, Patel and Moore demonstrate that throughout history, crises have always prompted fresh strategies to make the world cheap and safe for capitalism. At a time of crisis in all seven cheap things, innovative and systemic thinking is urgently required. This book proposes a radical new way of understanding—and reclaiming—the planet in the turbulent twenty-first century.

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